Happy New Year

Auld Lang Syne

  • Should old acquaintance be forgot,
  • and never brought to mind ?
  • Should old acquaintance be forgot,
  • and old lang syne ?

( CHORUS: For auld lang syne, my dear,  for auld lang syne,  we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,  for auld lang syne.)

  • And surely you’ll buy your pint cup !
  • and surely I’ll buy mine !
  • And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
  • for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

  • We two have run about the slopes,
  • and picked the daisies fine ;
  • But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
  • since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

  • We two have paddled in the stream,
  • from morning sun till dine† ;
  • But seas between us broad have roared
  • since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

  • And there’s a hand my trusty friend !
  • And give me a hand o’ thine !
  • And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
  • for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

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New Year’s Day is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar used in ancient Rome. With most countries using the Gregorian calendar as their main calendar, New Year’s Day is the closest thing to being the world’s only truly global public holiday, often celebrated with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts. January 1 on the Julian calendar currently corresponds to January 14 on the Gregorian calendar, and it is on that date that followers of some of the Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the New Year.

History

The Romans dedicated this day to Janus, the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. After Julius Caesar reformed the calendar in 46 BC and was subsequently murdered, the Roman Senate voted to deify him on the 1st January 42 BC in honour of his life and his institution of the new rationalised calendar. The month originally owes its name to the deity Janus, who had two faces, one looking forward and the other looking backward. This suggests that New Year’s celebrations are founded on pagan traditions. Some have suggested this occurred in 153 BC, when it was stipulated that the two annual consuls (after whose names the years were identified) entered into office on that day, though no consensus exists on the matter. Dates in March, coinciding with the spring equinox, or commemorating the Annunciation of Jesus, along with a variety of Christian feast dates were used throughout the Middle Ages, though calendars often continued to display the months in columns running from January to December.

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