Leap Year 29th February

A leap year (or intercalary or bissextile year) is a year containing one additional day (or, in the case of lunisolar calendars, a month) in order to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, a calendar that had the same number of days in each year would, over time, drift with respect to the event it was supposed to track. By occasionally inserting (or intercalating) an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year and a year that is a leap year is called a leap year:D

For example, in the Gregorian calendar (a common solar calendar), February in a leap year has 29 days instead of the usual 28, so the year lasts 366 days instead of the usual 365. Similarly, in the Hebrew calendar (a lunisolar calendar), a 13th lunar month is added seven times every 19 years to the twelve lunar months in its common years to keep its calendar year from drifting through the seasons too rapidly.

There are also many traditions associated with Leap Years. In Denmark, the tradition is that women may propose on the bissextile leap day, February 24, and that refusal must be compensated with 12 pairs of gloves. In Finland, the tradition is that if a man refuses a woman’s proposal on leap day, he should buy her the fabrics for a skirt. In Greece, marriage in a leap year is considered unlucky. One in five engaged couples in Greece will plan to avoid getting married in a leap year.

In the British Isles On 29th February, it is a tradition that women may propose marriage only on leap years. While it has been claimed that the tradition was initiated by Saint Patrick or Brigid of Kildare in 5th century Ireland, this is dubious, as the tradition has not been attested before the 19th century. Supposedly, a 1288 law by Queen Margaret of Scotland (then age five and living in Norway), required that fines be levied if a marriage proposal was refused by the man; compensation ranged from a kiss to £1 to a silk gown, in order to soften the blow. In some places the tradition was tightened to restricting female proposals to the modern leap day, February 29, or to the medieval (bissextile) leap day, February 24. However even this does not prevent them from going wrong, here are some cringe-inducing proposals that go slightly awry:

Food Court Proposal

It didn’t take long to find a prime example of a poorly thought-out proposal. I mean, even being”dizzy with love” is no excuse for believing that a shopping centre food court is an appropriate location. Her cringing body language and the hands covering her ears should have given Romeo the hint to stop talking before the guy with the guitar turned up and drew even more attention to this extremely awkward situation. In the final analysis, there was only one possible outcome …RUN, CAROLINE. RUN

Basketball Game Proposal

Not sure if this one is a setup. The woman’s reaction is so badly acted that it COULD be real. But the best thing about this video is the luckless wannabe husband finding comfort in the arms of someone dressed as a giant fluffy mouse. Oh, and the commentator saying at the end, “This is where amazing happens.” It sure is.

I think the moral is “Don’t propose in public”.

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