Mumford & Sons – Babel

I am a big fan of Mumford and Sons (A.K.A Marcus Mumford singing Ben Lovett playing piano, Winston Marshall playing banjo and dobro and Ted Dwane playing double bass) and I am currently listening to their second album “Babel”, which was released on 24th September 2012 and steps up Mumford & Sons’ game without changing it too much. It feels slightly shinier, punchier, more arena-scale than the debut album, Sigh No More, which was released in October 2009 to much critical Acclaim and rave reviews, won the band a UK Brit Award in 2010 (Best Album), was nominated for the prestigious Mercury Prize Award and also picked up two Grammy nominations (Best New Artist, Best Rock Song).

The new album has the band hollering, hooting, plucking and strumming like Olympian street buskers and the songs lean toward hooky folkfest stomps like “Little Lion Man” and “The Cave.” The album contains the tracks: Babel, Whispers in the Dark, I Will Wait, Holland Road, Ghosts that we Knew, Lover of the Light, Lover’s Eyes, Reminder, Hopeless Wanderer, Broken Crown, Below my Feet and Not with Haste, and is also full of all manner of religious shoptalk, with Biblical metaphors and the first hymnlike tunes, “I Will Wait,” and “Lover of the Light” – are proof that the Mumfords do dramatic builds, dropouts and soft-loud shifts as impressively as U2. There are also subtler and more British folk elements. Other highlights on the album include “Below My Feet.”, “Lovers’ Eyes” “Whispers in the Dark,”and”Broken Crown”, but all the songs are growing on me gradually.

Avengers Assemble

I have recently watched Director Joss Whedon’s latest film “Avengers Assemble”, again, which starts after The Villainous Loki (Tom Hiddleston) attacks the headquarters of International peace-Keeping agency S.H.I.E.L.D and steals a powerful device called the Tesseract which contains unlimited Energy, and which, in the wrong hands, could wipe out the human race. So Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) the boss at S.H.I.E.L.D calls upon “Earth’s Mightiest Superheroes” The Avengers – Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), The Incredible Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), and two of the world’s greatest assassins, Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) to recover the Tesseract, defeat Loki, who is possibly the darkest villain the Earth has ever known, and pull the world back from the brink of disaster.

Sadly though at first the team don’t get on at all – Stark describes Hulk as having ‘breathtaking anger management issues’, Tony Stark, himself is described as a volatile, self-obsessed loose cannon, who doesn’t play well with others, and Captain America, is a stiff-upper-lip product of the Forties, whose values are at odds with those of modern society. and Soon the differing attitudes of the superheroes have them acting at cross purposes, giving Loki and his cronies free reign to run amok & trash Manhattan. However this proves to be just the motivation the Superheroes need and they soon realise that they must coordinate their efforts and all work together in order to defeat Loki and his rampaging hordes, then the movie builds into a stirring and exciting climax.

Tribute to Ray Charles

American musician Ray Charles was born September 23, 1930. His musical curiosity was first sparked when he heard boogie woogie played on an old upright piano. Charles started to lose his sight at the age of five & went completely blind by the age of seven, apparently due to glaucoma. He attended school at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine from 1937 to 1945,where he developed his musical talent. During this time he performed on WFOY radio in St. Augustine. In school, Charles was taught only classical music, but wanted to play the jazz and blues. While at school, he became the school’s premier musician.

Charles was 15 When his mother died. He didn’t return to school, preferring instead, to play the piano for bands at the Ritz Theatre in LaVilla, earning $4 a night. He also played with a southern band called The Florida Playboys. This is where he began his habit of always wearing sunglasses, made by designer Billy Stickles. Charles had always played for other people, but he wanted his own band, so He decided to leave Florida and moved to Seattle in 1947 (where he first met and befriended a 14-year-old Quincy Jones, and soon started recording, first for the Down Beat label as the Maxin Trio with guitarist G.D. McKee and bassist Milton Garrett.

By fusing elements of rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues styles into his early recordings he became a pioneer in the genre of soul music and achieved his first hit with “Confession Blues” in 1949 and joined Swing Time Records where he recorded two more R&B hits, “Baby, Let Me Hold Your Hand” in 1951 and “Kissa Me Baby”in 1952. In early 1953 . Charles began recording jump blues and boogie-woogie style recordings as well as slower blues ballads where he continued to show the vocal influences of Nat “King” Cole and Charles Brown. “Mess Around” became Charles’ first Atlantic hit in 1953 and he later had hits the following year with “It Should Have Been Me” and “Don’t You Know”. He also recorded the songs, “Midnight Hour” and “Sinner’s Prayer”. Late in 1954, Charles recorded his own composition, “I Got a Woman”, and the song became Charles’ first number-one R&B hit in 1955 and brought him to national prominence.  The elements of “I Got a Woman” included a mixture of gospel, jazz and blues elements that would later prove to be seminal in the development of rock ‘n’ roll and soul music. He repeated this pattern throughout 1955 continuing through 1958 with records such as “This Little Girl of Mine”, “Drown in My Own Tears”, “Lonely Avenue”, “A Fool For You” and “The Night Time (Is the Right Time)”.Charles also recorded instrumental jazz albums such as 1957’s The Great Ray Charles. During this time, Charles also worked with jazz vibraphonist Milt Jackson, releasing Soul Brothers in 1958 and Soul Meeting in 1961 and reached the pinnacle of his success at Atlantic with the release of “What’d I Say”. Later in 1959, and released his first country song, a cover of Hank Snow’s “Movin’ On”, and had recorded three more albums for the label including a jazz record (later released in 1961 as The Genius After Hours), a blues record (released in 1961 as The Genius Sings the Blues) and a traditional pop/big band record (The Genius of Ray Charles).

In 1960 Charles received national acclaim and a Grammy Award for the Sid Feller- produced “Georgia on My Mind”, and also earned another Grammy for the follow-up “Hit the Road Jack”, and became one of the few black artists to crossover into mainstream pop. The 1962 album, Modern Sounds in Country and western Music and its sequel Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music, Vol. 2, also helped to bring country into the mainstream of music. He also had major pop hits in 1963 with “Busted” (US No. 4) and Take These Chains From My Heart. In 1965, Charles’ was arrested for a third time for heroin and After spending a year on parole, Charles reemerged on the charts in 1966 with a series of hits including “I Don’t Need No Doctor” , “Let’s Go Get Stoned”, “Crying Time” and “Here We Go Again”. However, Charles’ renewed chart success, proved to be short lived and by the late 1960s his music was rarely played on radio stations, although Charles’ 1972 album, Message from the People, was a hit and included his unique gospel- influenced version of “America the Beautiful” and His 1975 recording of Stevie Wonder’s hit, “Living for the City” later helped Charles win another Grammy.

In 1977, he recorded the album, True to Life and In April 1979, Charles’ version of “Georgia On My Mind” was proclaimed the state song of Georgia and An emotional Charles performed the song on the floor of the state legislature. During the 1980’s Charles recorded a string of country albums and began having a string of country hits often with duet singers such as George Jones, Chet Atkins, B.J. Thomas, Mickey Gilley, Hank Williams, Jr. and lifelong friend Willie Nelson, for which he recorded the No. 1 country duet, “Seven Spanish Angels”. He also made a return on the R&B charts with a cover of The Brothers Johnson’s “I’ll Be Good to You”, in collaboration with his lifelong buddy Quincy Jones and singer Chaka Khan, which hit number-one on the R&B charts in 1990 and won Charles and Khan a Grammy. Charles returned on the pop charts in another duet, with singer Billy Joel on the song, “Baby Grand” and in 1989, recorded a cover of the Southern All Stars’ “Itoshi no Ellie”, releasing it as “Ellie My Love”. Charles’ 1993 album, My World also became his first album in some time to reach the Billboard 200 and his cover of Leon Russell’s “A Song for You” gave him a charted hit on the adult contemporary chart as well as his twelfth and final Grammy he would receive in his lifetime. In 1980, he also made a cameo on the film, The Blues Brothers.

Charles’ version of “Night Time is the Right Time” was also played during the popular “Cosby Show” episode, “Happy Anniversary” and In 1985, he appeared among a slew of other popular musicians in the USA for Africa charity recording, “We Are the World”. Charles also appeared at two Presidential inaugurations in his lifetime. In 1985, he performed for Ronald Reagan’s second inauguration, and in 1993 for Bill Clinton’s first. In 2003, Ray Charles also headlined the White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington, D.C. where the President, First Lady, Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice attended. In 2003 Charles performed “Georgia On My Mind” and “America the Beautiful” at a televised annual electronic media journalist banquet held in Washington, D.C. His final public appearance came on April 30, 2004, at the dedication of his music studio as a historic landmark in the city of Los Angeles.  He sadly passed away on June 10, 2004 as a result of liver failure/hepatitis C at his home. He was 73 years old. His body was interred in the Inglewood Park Cemetery.His final album, Genius Loves Company, released two months after his death, consists of duets with various admirers and contemporaries: B.B. King, Van Morrison, Willie Nelson, James Taylor, Gladys Knight, Michael McDonald, Natalie Cole, Elton John, Bonnie Raitt, Diana Krall, Norah Jones, and Johnny Mathis. The album won eight Grammy Awards, including five for Ray Charles for Best Pop Vocal Album, Album of the Year, Record of the Year and Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for “Here We Go Again” with Norah Jones, and Best Gospel Performance for “Heaven Help Us All” with Gladys Knight; he also received nods for his duets with Elton John and B.B. King. The album included a version of Harold Arlen’s “Over the Rainbow”, sung as a duet by Charles and Johnny Mathis; this record was played at his memorial service

Two more posthumous albums, Genius & Friends and Ray Sings, Basie Swings, were released. Genius & Friends consisted of duets recorded from 1997 to 2005 with his choice of artists. Ray Sings, Basie Swings consists of archived vocals of Ray Charles from live mid-1970s performances added to new instrumental tracks specially recorded by the contemporary Count Basie Orchestra and other musicians. Charles’s vocals recorded from the concert mixing board were added to new accompaniments to create a “fantasy concert”  recording. The late great Frank Sinatra called Charles “the only true genius in show business” and Rolling Stone ranked Charles number ten on their list of “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” in 2004, and number two on their November 2008 list of “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”.

Doctor Who – The Power of Three

Millions of Mysterious Black Cubes suddenly arrive on Earth, so The Doctor (Matt Smith) Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) and Rory (Arthur Darvill) aided by U.N.I.T investigate. At first the cubes don’t move, however the Doctor is still convinced that they are dangerous in some way, but how? Then they all suddenly activate at the same moment and start counting down…but to what?

Then  Rory’s dad Brian (Mark Williams)gets kidnapped, closely followed by The Doctor Amy and Rory who give chase, and they all find themselves aboard an alien spaceship belonging to the Shakri who view mankind as a plague and have disturbing plans for Earth.

English singer, actress and Former Doctor Who companion Billie Piper (Rose Tyler) also celebrates her birthday on 22nd September.Born in Swindon, Wiltshire) in 1982, Piper began performing in plays and dance, as she wanted to go into acting. She began her career however as a pop singer in the late 1990s, after she was talent spotted at the Sylvia Young stage school by Smash Hits magazine, who gave her a role in a television commercial promoting the pop magazine Smash Hits, as well as a recording contract at the age of 15. and she entered the UK singles chart with “Because We Want To”, *shudder* released under the stage mononym “Billie” and Her follow-up single “Girlfriend” *shudder* which debuted at number one, and she became the youngest artist ever to debut at number one in the Her debut album Honey to the B was released immediately afterwards, and debuted and peaked at Number 14 in the UK album charts, gaining a Platinum certification in the UK.

She later decided to retire from singing and refocus on her original ambition as an actress, and In May 2004, it was announced that Doctor Who would be resurrected beginning in 2005, and that Piper was to play the character Rose Tyler, a travelling companion to The Doctor (Christopher Eccleston). Piper won the Most Popular Actress category at the 2005 and 2006 National Television Awards for her work on Doctor Who. BBC News named Piper as one of its “Faces of the Year” for 2005, primarily due to her success in Doctor Who. She also reprised this role in 2008 and 2010.

In 2004, Piper also appeared in the films The Calcium Kid, as the romantic interest of Orlando Bloom’s character, and Things to do Before You’re Thirty.In November 2005, Piper starred as Hero in a BBC adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing. Piper also starred as Victorian orphan, Sally Lockhart, in BBC adaptations of Philip Pullman’s historical novels The Ruby in the Smoke and The Shadow in the North. From 2007 until 2011, she starred as the high-flying escort Belle de Jour (A.K.A Hannah Baxter) in the TV series Secret Diary of a Call Girl.

Happy Birthday David Coverdale

English rock singer David ‘Jack’ Coverdale was born 22 September 1951. He is most famous for his work with Whitesnake, the commercially successful hard rock band he founded in 1976. Before Whitesnake, Coverdale was the lead singer of Deep Purple from late 1973 to March 15, 1976, when he resigned from the band and established his solo career. A collaboration album with Jimmy Page, released in 1993, was also a commercial and critical success.

Deep Purple were formed in Hertford in 1968. They are considered to be among the pioneers of heavy metal and modern hard rock, although some band members claimed that their music cannot be categorised as belonging to any one genre. They were once listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as “the globe’s loudest band”, and have sold over 100 million albums worldwide, including 7.5 million certified units in the US. Deep Purple were ranked number 22 on VH1’s Greatest Artists of Hard Rock programme.The band has gone through many line-up changes and an eight-year hiatus (1976–84). The 1968–76 line-ups are commonly labelled Mark I, II, III and IV. Their second and most commercially successful line-up featured Ian Gillan (vocals), Roger Glover (bass), Jon Lord (keyboards), Ian Paice (drums), and Ritchie Blackmore (guitar). This line-up was active from 1969 to 1973, and was revived from 1984 to 1989, and again in 1993, before the rift between Blackmore and other members became unbridgeable. The current line-up (including guitarist Steve Morse) has been much more stable, although Lord’s retirement from the band in 2002 has left Paice as the only original Deep Purple member still in the band. At the 2011 Classic Rock Awards in London, they received the Innovator Award. As of 2012, Deep Purple have not been nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Whitesnake were founded in 1978 by David Coverdale after his departure from his previous band, Deep Purple. Their early material has been compared by critics to Deep Purple, but by the mid 1980s they had moved to a more commercial hard rock style. Four of the band’s earliest albums reached the top 10 in the UK, with Ready an’ Willing (1980), Come an’ Get It (1981), Saints & Sinners (1982) and Slide It In (1984). The band’s 1987 self-titled album was their most commercially successful worldwide, and contained two of their most recognisable songs, “Here I Go Again” and “Is This Love”. In 1988, Whitesnake was nominated for the Brit Award for Best British Group. In 2005, Whitesnake was named the 85th greatest hard rock band of all time.

Tribute to Sir Henry Segrave

Famous for setting three land speed records and the water speed record, Sir Henry O’Neil de Hane Segrave was born in Baltimore, Maryland on 22nd September 1896. He was the first person to hold both the land and water speed records simultaneously and became the first person to travel at over 200 mph (320 km/h) in a land vehicle.

He was commissioned into the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 1914 and served as a fighter pilot with the Royal Flying Corps from January 1916. In July 1916 he became a flight commander as a temporary captain. In 1919 he transferred to the Royal Air Force Administrative Branch, but soon resigned his commission due to his wounds. Segrave bragged that he would drive a car at over 200 miles per hour (320 km/h). In 1921 the 200-Mile Race at Brooklands was organised by the Junior Car Club, the first long-distance race to be run in Britain. The race, a contest for 1,500 c.c. light cars, was won by Segrave in a Talbot-Darracq. He was the first Briton to win a Grand Prix in a British car. He won the 1923 French Grand Prix and the 1924 San Sebastian Grand Prix at Circuito Lasarte (Spain) in a Sunbeam automobile. After a further win at Miramas in France, he retired from racing to concentrate on speed records.

On 21 March 1926, he set his first land speed record in his 4-litre Sunbeam Tiger Ladybird on the sands at Southport, England at 152.33 mph (245.149 km/h). This record lasted for just over a month, until broken by J.G. Parry-Thomas driving Babs. He regained the land speed record in 29 March 1927 in his 1000 HP Sunbeam Mystery (also known as ‘the Slug’) at the Daytona Beach Road Course at 203.79 mph (327.97 km/h), becoming the first person to travel over 200 mph (320 km/h).Segrave set his final land speed record at 231.45 mph (372.46 km/h) in his new car, the beautiful Golden Arrow, at Daytona Beach on 11 March 1929. This car had only 18.74 miles (30.16 km) on it, which makes it the least used car to set the World Land Speed record.  Segrave then began concentrating on the water speed record. Golden Arrow has never been used since. The Golden Arrow is on display along with the Sunbeam 350HP and the Sunbeam 1000HP at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu.

Segrave was also an avid motorboat racer and after his 1929 land speed record, he immediately went to Miami for a motorboat race against Garfield Wood, multiple water speed record holder and the first man to travel over 100 miles per hour on water. Segrave won, causing Wood’s first defeat in nine years. After Segrave returned to Great Britain, he was knighted for his many accomplishments. A few months after receiving his knighthood, on Friday 13 June 1930, Sir Henry Segrave unknowingly captured the water speed record driving Miss England II on England’s largest natural lake, Windermere. In a follow-up run the boat presumably hit a log and capsized, killing Miss England’s mechanic, Victor Halliwell. Segrave’s unconscious body was recovered, and taken to a hospital. He regained consciousness for a moment, was informed that he had indeed broken the record, then died a few moments later of lung haemorrhages on 13 June 1930 however The Segrave Trophy was established in 1930 to commemorate his life.

Swedish race car driver Rickard Rydell was Born September 22nd 1967

Tribute to H.G.Wells

If anybody mentions Science-Fiction to me I get very excited, so I thought I would pay tribute to English author, Herbert George “H. G.” Wells who was born 21st September 1866 in Bromley, Kent. He is best known for his work in the science fiction genre but also wrote contemporary novels about, history, politics and social commentary, as well as textbooks and rules for war games. Together with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback, Wells has been referred to as “The Father of Science Fiction”. His most notable science fiction works include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau & his earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also  from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of “Journalist.” Most of his later novels were not science fiction. Some described lower-middle class life (Kipps; The History of Mr Polly), leading him to be touted as a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. Wells also wrote abundantly about the “New Woman” and the Suffragettes.A defining incident of young Wells’s life was an accident in 1874 that left him bedridden with a broken leg. To pass the time he started reading books from the local library, brought to him by his father. He soon became devoted to the other worlds and lives to which books gave him access; they also stimulated his desire to write. Later that year he entered Thomas Morley’s Commercial Academy, until 1880. From 1880 to 1883, Wells had an unhappy apprenticeship as a draper at the Southsea Drapery Emporium, Hyde’s, this later inspired his novels The Wheels of Chance and Kipps, which portray the life of a draper’s apprentice as well as providing a critique of society’s distribution of wealth.

In October 1879 Wells joined the National School at Wookey in Somerset as a pupil-teacher, a senior pupil who acted as a teacher of younger children. After a short apprenticeship at a chemist in nearby Midhurst, and an even shorter stay as a boarder at Midhurst Grammar School, an opportunity was offered by Midhurst Grammar School again to become a pupil-teacher; his proficiency in Latin and science during his previous, short stay had been remembered aand enabled him to continue his self-education in earnest. The following year, Wells won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science (later the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, now part of Imperial College London) in London, studying biology under Thomas Henry Huxley (Who was an English biologist (anatomist), known as “Darwin’s Bulldog” for his advocacy of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution) where He soon entered the Debating Society of the school. These years mark the beginning of his interest in a possible reformation of society. At first approaching the subject through The Republic by Plato, he soon turned to contemporary ideas of socialism as expressed by the recently formed Fabian Society and free lectures delivered at Kelmscott House, the home of William Morris. He was also among the founders of The Science School Journal, a school magazine which allowed him to express his views on literature and society, as well as trying his hand at fiction: the first version of his novel The Time Machine was published in the journal under the title, The Chronic Argonauts. After teaching for some time, Wells found it necessary to supplement his knowledge relating to educational principles and methodology and entered the College of Preceptors (College of Teachers). He later received his Licentiate and Fellowship FCP diplomas from the College. It was not until 1890 that Wells earned a Bachelor of Science degree in zoology from the University of London External Programme, In 1889–90 he managed to find a post as a teacher at Henley House School where he taught A. A. Milne.

NOVELS

Wells’s first non-fiction bestseller was Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought and Some of his early novels, invented a number of themes now classic in science fiction in such works as The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, When the Sleeper Wakes, and The First Men in the Moon. He also wrote realistic novels that received critical acclaim, including Kipps and a satire on Edwardian advertising, Tono-Bungay. Wells also wrote dozens of short stories and novellas, the best known of which is “The Country of the Blind” (1904). His short story “The New Accelerator” was also the inspiration for the Star Trek episode Wink of an Eye. Wells also wrote non-fiction including, The Outline of History, A Short History of the World, The Science of Life and The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind. Wells also wrote a number of Utopian novels including A Modern Utopia,  which usually begin with the  rushing to catastrophe, until people realise a better way of living, such as abandoning war (In the Days of the Comet) or having a world council of scientists taking over, as in The Shape of Things to Come, which was later adapted for the 1936 Alexander Korda film, Things to Come. Men Like Gods is also a utopian novel. Wells also contemplated the ideas of nature versus nurture and questions humanity in books such as The Island of Doctor Moreau, In which an unfortunate chap finds himself trapped on an island of animals being vivisected unsuccessfully into human beings, and after eventually escaping he finds himself unable to shake off the perceptions that his fellow humans as barely civilised beasts, slowly reverting to their animal natures.

In 1936, Wells called for the compilation of a constantly growing and changing World Encyclopaedia, to be reviewed by outstanding authorities and made accessible to every human being. In 1938, he published a collection of essays on the future organisation of knowledge and education, World Brain, including the essay, “The Idea of a Permanent World Encyclopaedia”. Seeking a more structured way to play war games, Wells also wrote Floor Games followed by Little Wars which is recognised today as the first recreational wargame and Wells is regarded by gamers and hobbyists as “the Father of Miniature War Gaming”. His most consistent political ideal was the World State, which he considered inevitable. He envisioned the state to be a planned society that would advance science, end nationalism, and allow people to progress by merit rather than birth, Wells also believed in the theory of eugenics and Some contemporary supporters even suggested connections between the degenerate man-creatures portrayed in The Time Machine and Wells’s eugenic beliefs. Wells also brought his interest in Art & Design and politics together when he and other notables signed a memorandum to the Permanent Secretaries of the Board of Trade, which led to the foundation of the Design and Industries Association. In his last book Mind at the End of its Tether he considered the idea that humanity being replaced by another species might not be a bad idea. He also came to call the era “The Age of Frustration”.

During his final years he began to be particularly outspoken in his criticism of the Catholic Church, he was also a diabetic, and in 1934 co-founded what is now Diabetes UK, the leading charity for people living with diabetes in the UK. On 28 October 1940 Wells was interviewed by Orson Welles, who two years previously had performed an infamous radio adaptation of The War of the Worlds, on KTSA radio in San Antonio, Texas. In the interview, Wells admitted his surprise at the widespread panic that resulted from the broadcast, but acknowledged his debt to Welles for increasing sales of one of his “more obscure” titles. Wells sadly passed away on 13 August 1946 of unspecified causes at his home in London, aged 79. In his preface to the 1941 edition of The War in the Air, Wells had stated that his epitaph should be: “I told you so. You damned fools”. He was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium on 16 August 1946, his ashes scattered at sea. A commemorative blue plaque in his honour was installed at his home in Regent’s Park.