Daren Jay “DJ” Ashba (Guns ‘N’Roses, ASHBA,Bullet Boys & Beautiful creatures)

American musician, producer, songwriter and CEO of Ashba Media Daren Jay “DJ” Ashba was born November 10, 1972 . He is one of the co-lead guitarists in Guns N’ Roses (along with Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal) and the lead guitarist in Sixx:A.M. He is also known for his work with hard rock bands BulletBoys and Beautiful Creatures. Ashba has worked with various artists including Mötley Crüe, Drowning Pool, Marion Raven, Aimee Allen and Neil Diamond.he joined the group Barracuda and toured with the band for two years. In 1996, he released his debut instrumental album titled, Addiction to the Friction In 1998, Ashba joined BulletBoys as part of the band’s new lineup It was during his time with the band that he met Joe Lesté of Bang Tango. ‘n 1999, he departed the group to start a new band with Lesté.

In 1999, Ashba began piecing together the band that would become Beautiful Creatures with Bang Tango frontman Joe Lesté. They added former Shake The Faith and No. 9 bassist Kenny Kweens and session drummer Anthony Focx, who performed in the 1992 film Wayne’s World appearing as the drummer in Tia Carrere’s club band Focx became the group’s second guitarist and Glen Sobel, another session drummer, was brought in to take over drums. This was the first lineup under the moniker Beautiful Creatures. Prior to naming, the band opened one show in Houston, Texas for Kiss during their reunion tour after Ted Nugent pulled out The band then signed with Warner Bros. and released their self-titled debut Beautiful Creatures, produced by Marilyn Manson cohortSean Beavan, on August 14, 2001 Album track 1 A.M. was featured in the soundtrack for the 2001 horror film Valentine and TV series Smallville. Ride was featured on the soundtrack to the 2002 remake of Rollerball.[8] Despite appearing at Ozzfest, the Rolling Rock Tour the band was dropped from their label due to poor album sales. It’s important to note that the record was not available in the stores yet while they toured Ozzfest. On February 13, 2002, the band announced that Ashba had left the group and the band found a replacement and continued o

He formed another solo band, simply titled ASHBA after his departure from Beautiful Creatures where he added former Tuff guitarist Michael Thomas, who was Ashba’s replacement in BC but left the group in 2003, bassist John Younger and drummer Blas Eliasrounded out the groups lineup.] Also in 2003, Ashba was invited to participate in the group Brides of Destruction with Nikki Sixxand Tracii Guns but turned it down to focus on his solo project. In 2005, a small controversy was caused when it was suggested that neither Tommy Lee nor Mick Mars played on the new tracks for Mötley Crüe’s compilation album Red, White & Crüe (duties were supposedly handled by Vandals’ drummer Josh Freese and Ashba as well as Mick being replaced by Ashba on their reunioAshba released the critically acclaimed album The Heroin Diaries Soundtrack after collaborating with Mötley Crüe bassist Nikki Sixxand producer James Michael under the name Sixx:A.M. in August, 2007 serving as a soundtrack to Sixx’s autobiography The Heroin Diaries: A Year in the Life of a Shattered Rock Star.The single Life is Beautiful reached #2 on the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks. Originally the group stated they had no intention of touring. After constant support for the band and interest in a tour, they held a nationwide vote for tour dates. The tour was scheduled to start in spring 2008, but had been postponed to the summer due to unforeseeable circumstances

On April 15, 2008, Sixx:A.M. announced they would be touring as part of Mötley Crüe’s Crüe Fest, along with Buckcherry, Papa Roach and Trapt. The tour began on July 1, 2008, in West Palm Beach, Florida. During Crüe Fest, Papa Roach drummer Tony Palermo served as a touring drummer for the band. A deluxe tour edition of The Heroin Diaries Soundtrack was released on November 25, 2008, which included a bonus live EP entitled Life Is Beautiful which features recorded performances from the band’s summer tour. In April 2009, both James Michael and Nikki Sixx confirmed that the band is currently in the studio, recording new material. Sixx added that the new material is “inspiring. it feels like we may have topped ourselves on this album coming up, and can’t wait for you to hear what it sounds like.” On May 3, 2011 the current Sixx:A.M. album “This Is Gonna Hurt” was released. In

 March 2009 Ashba was announced as the new lead guitarist of Guns N’ Roses replacing Robin Finck, who had left the band to rejoin Nine Inch Nails He first toured with the band as part of the Chinese Democracy Tour where on December 11, 2009 Guns N’ Roses played in Taiwan.He is currently on tour with the band as part of its 2013 Australian Tour”. ‘

In 2003 Ashba founded Ashba Media, Inc. This creative agency was announced the Agency of Record for Virgin Entertainment. AMI designs the look and feel of every Virgin Megastore. They also have other clients, such as Ovation guitars, Royal Undergroundand many more. Daren owns two corporations, Ashba Media, Inc. which handles the art side of things and Ashbaland, Inc. which handles the music side of things.Ashba contributed to Mötley Crüe’s 2008 album Saints of Los Angeles penning all tracks with the exception of This Ain’t a Love Song The title track Saints of Los Angeles was nominated for a Grammy the same yea.

 

Tribute to William Hogarth

English painter,printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic, and editorial cartoonist William Hogarth was born 10 November 1697 . He has been credited with pioneering western sequential art. His work ranged from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called “modern moral subjects”. Knowledge of his work is so pervasive that satirical political illustrations in this style are often referred to as “Hogarthian”  By April 1720, Hogarth was an engraver in his own right, at first engraving coats of arms, shop bills, and designing plates for booksellers.In 1727, he was hired by Joshua Morris, a tapestry worker, to prepare a design for the Element of Earth. Morris heard that he was “an engraver, and no painter”, and consequently declined the work when completed. Hogarth accordingly sued him for the money in the Westminster Court, where the case was decided in his favour on 28 May 1728. In 1757 he was appointed Serjeant Painter to the King.

Early satirical works included an Emblematical Print on the South Sea Scheme , about the disastrous stock market crash of 1720 known as the South Sea Bubble, in which many English people lost a great deal of money. In the bottom left corner, he shows Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish figures gambling, while in the middle there is a huge machine, like a merry-go-round, which people are boarding. At the top is a goat, written below which is “Who’l Ride”. The people are scattered around the picture with a sense of disorder, while the progress of the well dressed people towards the ride in the middle shows the foolishness of the crowd in buying stock in the South Sea Company, which spent more time issuing stock than anything else.Other early works include The Lottery ; The Mystery of Masonry brought to Light by the Gormogons ; A Just View of the British Stage ; some book illustrations; and the small print, Masquerades and Operas. The latter is a satire on contemporary follies, such as the masquerades of the Swiss impresario John James Heidegger, the popular Italian opera singers,John Rich’s pantomimes at Lincoln’s Inn Fields, and the exaggerated popularity of Lord Burlington’s protégé, the architect and painter William Kent. He continued that theme in 1727, with the Large Masquerade Ticket. In 1726 Hogarth prepared twelve large engravings for Samuel Butler’s Hudibras. These he himself valued highly, and are among his best book illustrations.The Assembly at Wanstead House. Earl Tylney and family in foregroundIn the following years he turned his attention to the production of small “conversation pieces” . Among his paintings  were The Fountaine Family (c.1730), The Assembly at Wanstead House, The House of Commons examining Bambridge, and several pictures o’f the chief actors in John Gay’s popular The Beggar’s OperaOne of Hogarth’s masterpieces of this period is the depiction of an amateur performance of John Dryden’s The Indian Emperor, or The Conquest of Mexico at the home of John Conduitt, master of the mint, in St George’s Street, Hanover Square.Hogarth’s other works in the 1730s include A Midnight Modern Conversation(1733), Southwark Fair , The Sleeping Congregation  Before andAfter (1736), Scholars at a Lecture’ The Company of Undertakers (Consultation of Quacks) (1736), The Distrest Poet (1, The Four Times of the Day (1738), and Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn . He might also have printed Burlington Gate (1731), evoked by Alexander Pope’s Epistle to Lord Burlington, and defending Lord Chandos, who is therein satirized. This print gave great offence, and was suppressed. However, modern authorities such as Ronald Paulson no longer attribute it to HogHarlot’s and Rake’s Progresses[edit

In 1731, Hogarth completed the earliest of the series of moral works which first gave him recognition as a great and original genius. This was A Harlot’s Progress, first as paintings, (now lost), and then published as engravings. In its six scenes, the miserable fate of a country girl who began a prostitution career in town is traced out remorselessly from its starting point, the meeting of a bawd, to its shameful and degraded end, the whore’s death of venereal disease and the following merciless funeral ceremony. The series was an immediate success, and was followed in 1735 by the sequel A Rake’s Progress showing in eight pictures the reckless life of Tom Rakewell, the son of a rich merchant, who wastes all his money on luxurious living, whoring, and gambling, and ultimately finishes his life in Bedlam. The original paintings of A Harlot’s Progress were destroyed in the fire at Fonthill House in 1755; A Rake’s Progress is displayed in the gallery room at Sir John Soane’s Museum, London.

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In 1743–1745, Hogarth painted the six pictures of Marriage à-la-mode (National Gallery, London), a pointed skewering of upper-class 18th-century society. This moralistic warning shows the miserable tragedy of an ill-considered marriage for money. This is regarded by many as his finest project and may be among his best-planned story serials.Marital ethics were the topic of much debate in 18th-century Britain. Frequent marriages of convenience and their attendant unhappiness came in for particular criticism, with a variety of authors taking the view that love was a much sounder basis for marriage. Hogarth here painted a satire – a genre that by definition has a moral point to convey – of a conventional marriage within the English upper class. All the paintings were engraved and the series achieved wide circulation in print form. The series, which are set in a Classical interior, shows the story of the fashionable marriage of the son of bankrupt Earl Squanderfield to the daughter of a wealthy but miserly city merchant, starting with the signing of a marriage contract at the Earl’s mansion and ending with the murder of the son by his wife’s lover and the suicide of the daughter after her lover is hanged at Tyburn for murdering her huIn the twelve prints of Industry and Idleness (1747) Hogarth shows the progression in the lives of two apprentices, one of whom is dedicated and hard working, the other idle which leads to crime and his execution. This shows the work ethic of Protestant England, where those who work hard get rewarded, such as the industrious apprentice who becomes Sheriff, Alderman, and finally the Lord Mayor of London in the last plate in the series. The idle apprentice, who begins with being “at play in the churchyard” (plate 3), holes up “in a Garrett with a Common Prostitute” after turning highwayman) and “executed at Tyburn” ). The idle apprentice is sent to the gallows by the industrious apprentice himself.

Later important prints include his pictorial warning of the unpleasant consequences ofalcoholism in Beer Street and Gin Lane (1751) Hogarth engraved Beer Street to show a happy city drinking the ‘good’ beverage of English beer, versus Gin Lane which showed the effects of drinking gin which, as a harder liquor, caused more problems for society. People are shown as healthy, happy and prosperous in Beer Street, while in Gin Lane they are scrawny, lazy and careless. The woman at the front of Gin Lane who lets her baby fall to its death echoes the tale of Judith Dufour who strangled her baby so she could sell its clothes for gin money. The prints were published in support of what would become theGin Act 1751.Hogarth’s friend, the magistrate Henry Fielding, may have enlisted Hogarth to help with propaganda for a Gin Act: Beer Street and Gin Lane were issued shortly after his work An Enquiry into the Causes of the Late Increase of Robbers, and Related Writings and addressed the same issues.Other prints were his outcry against inhumanity in The Four Stages of Cruelty (published 21 February 1751), in which Hogarth depicts the cruel treatment of animals which he saw around him and suggests what will happen to people who carry on in this manner. In the first picture there are scenes of torture of dogs, cats and other animals. The second shows one of the characters from the first painting, Tom Nero, has now become a coach driver, and his cruelty to his horse has caused it to break its leg. In the third painting Tom is shown as a murderer, with the woman he killed lying on the ground, while in the fourth, titled Reward of Cruelty, the murderer is shown being dissected by scientists after his execution. The method of execution, and the dissection, reflect the 1752 Act of Parliament allowing for the dissection of executed criminals who had been convicted forExamples of his history pictures are The Pool of Bethesda and The Good Samaritan, executed in 1736–1737 for St Bartholomew’s Hospital; Moses brought before Pharaoh’s Daughter, painted for the Foundling Hospital (1747, formerly at the Thomas Coram Foundation for Children, now in theFoundling Museum); Paul before Felix (1748) at Lincoln’s Inn; and his altarpiece for St. Mary Redcliffe, Bristol (1756) The Gate of Calais (1748; now in Tate Britain) was produced soon after his return from a visit to France. Horace Walpole wrote that Hogarth had run a great risk to go there since the peace of Aix-la-Chape. Hogarth died in London on 26 October 1764 and was buried at St. Nicholas’s Churchyard, Chiswick Mall, Chiswick, London. His friend, actor David Garrick, composed the following inscription for his tombstone:,lle, murder.sband.arth

Remembrance sunday

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This years Poignant Remembrance Sunday service took place on 10th November and was Led by Members of the The Royal Family including Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, HRH Prince  William the Duke of Cambridge, Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, HRH Prince Andrew – The Duke of York, HRH Prince Edward – The Earl of Wessex, The Princess Royal Princess Anne, Prince Michael of Kent and Field Marshal Lord GutJohnrie of Craigiebank. and observed by HRH the Duchess of Cambridge and HRH Countess of Wessex The event included the traditional Laying of the Wreaths and March-past the Cenotaph War Memorial in Whitehall London finishing at Horseguards Parade.  This year nearly 10,000 people took part.

When I was younger I used to be a member of the Scouts so I’ve taken part in numerous local Remembrance Sunday Parades myself.Various other dignitaries also attending the event included Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, Labour leader Ed Milliband,  Westminster Plaid Cymru group leader Elfyn Llwyd,  who was representing both Plaid Cymru and Scottish National Party,  Mayor of London Boris Johnson, Former Prime Ministers John Major, Gordon Brown and Tony Blair, Education Secretary Michael Gove and Home Secretary Theresa May as well as Forty seven High Commissioners Representing the Commonwealth Leaders and fifteen Religious leaders including representatives of the Roman Catholic, Jewish, Buddhist, Sikh, Zaoastrian and Hindu faiths and The President of the Royal British Legion also laid a wreath

There was a Brief service conducted by the Bishop of London, then at The first stroke of Big Ben at 11am the firing of a gun from Horse Guards Parade by The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery marked the start of two minutes’ silence, which was followed by The Last Post, sounded by the Buglers of the Royal Marines. This was Followed by the National Anthem, other music was performed by Chapel Royal Choir School and the Massed Bands of the Black Watch and the Royal Marines, which included Rule Britannia, Heart of Oak (The Unofficial Anthem of the Royal Navy) and Nimrod from Sir Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations” (Which always brings a lump to my throat).Organisations taking part in the march-past the Cenotaph includedRoyal navy associationRoyal Airforce AssociationParatroop Regiment associationRoyal Marines AssociationMerchant Navy AssociationFleet air arm associationGurkhas Association Burma Star associationThe ChinditzRoyal Mechanical Engineers associationRoyal Northumberland fusiliers associationRoyal Army Corps656 squadron AssociationHome GuardRoyal Engineers AssociationArmy Air CorpsMetropolitan PoliceRoyal Pioneer CorpsReconnaissance corpsMaritime Air AssociationBomber CommandRoyal Observer CorpsFalklands AssociationSappers AssociationWar Widows AssociationIrish Defence AssociationRoyal Marine Commandos associationThe Salvation ArmyNAAFI AssociationNational Association of Retired Police OfficersSt Johns AmbulanceCommonwealth Graves Association

Elesewhere The Archbishop of Canturbury designate, the Right Revd. Justin Welbey, Bishop of Durham, led a remembrance service at St. Gabriel’s Church in Sunderland and at The National Memorial Arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire, there was an outdoor service of remembrance. The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester represented the Queen at the service,The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO laid a wreath at The Armed Forces Memorial during the service which was attended by more than 3,000 people. The arboretum’s focal point, the national Armed Forces Memorial, is designed so that on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, a shaft of sunlight dissects its inner and outer walls, falling on a bronze wreath sculpture.The Portland stone memorial is the nation’s tribute to more than 16,000 servicemen and women who have died on duty, or as a result of terrorism, since 1948.In Scotland, First Minister Alex Salmond joined the Lord Lieutenant and Lord Provost of Edinburgh Donald Wilson, Scottish Secretary Michael Moore, military leaders, veterans and serving personnel at the Stone of Remembrance at the City Chambers in Edinburgh.He observed a two minute silence and laid a wreath on behalf of the people of Scotland. The First Minister then attended a Service of Remembrance at St Giles Cathedral.In Northern Ireland Taoiseach Enda Kenny laid a wreath on behalf of the Irish Government, at the cenotaph in Enniskillen, during a commemoration ceremony on the  anniversary of the IRA Poppy Day bomb attack