Mothering Sunday

This year Sunday 30 March is Mothering Sunday. Mothering Sunday is a Christian holiday celebrated throughout Europe that falls on the 4th Sunday in Lent. Secularly, it became an occasion for honouring the mothers of children and giving them presents I t is increasingly being called Mother’s Day, although that has always been a secular event quite different from the original Mothering Sunday. In the UK, Mothering Sunday is celebrated in the same way as Mother’s Day is celebrated elsewhere. It came about During the sixteenth century, when people returned to their mother church, the main church or cathedral of the area, for a service to be held on Laetare Sunday. This was either a large local church, or more often the nearest Cathedral.Anyone who did this was commonly said to have gone “a-mothering”, although whether this term preceded the observance of Mothering Sunday is unclear. In later times, Mothering Sunday became a day when domestic servants were given a day off to visit their mother church, usually with their own mothers and other family members. It was often the only time that whole families could gather together, since on other days they were prevented by conflicting working hours, and servants were not given free days on other occasions.Children and young people who were “in service” (as household servants) were given a day off on that date so they could visit their families (or, originally, return to their “mother” church). The children would pick wild flowers along the way to place in the church or give to their mothers. Eventually, the religious tradition evolved into the Mothering Sunday secular tradition of giving gifts to mothers.

By the 1920s the custom of keeping Mothering Sunday had tended to lapse in Ireland and in continental Europe. In 1914, inspired by Anna Jarvis’s efforts in the United States, Constance Penswick-Smith created the Mothering Sunday Movement,and in 1921 she wrote a book asking for the revival of the festival; Constance was the daughter of the vicar of Coddington, Nottinghamshire, and there is a memorial in Coddington’s church.Its widescale revival was through the influence of American and Canadian soldiers serving abroad during World War II; the traditions of Mothering Sunday, still practised by the Church of England and Church of Ireland were merged with the newly imported traditions and celebrated in the wider Catholic and secular society. UK-based merchants saw the commercial opportunity in the holiday and relentlessly promoted it in the UK; by the 1950s, it was celebrated across all the UK. People from Ireland and the UK started celebrating Mother’s Day on the same day that Mothering Sunday was celebrated, the fourth Sunday in Lent. The two celebrations have now been mixed up, and many people think that they are the same thing. Mothering Sunday remains in the calendar of some Canadian Anglican churches, particularly those with strong English connections.

The other names attributed to this festival include Refreshment Sunday, Pudding Pie Sunday (in Surrey, England), Mid-Lent Sunday. Simnel Sunday and Rose Sunday. Simnel Sunday is named after the practice of baking Simnel cakes to celebrate the reuniting of families during the austerity of Lent. Because there is traditionally a relaxation of Lenten vows on this particular Sunday in celebration of the fellowship of family and church, the name Refreshment Sunday is sometimes used, although rarely today. Rose Sunday is sometimes used as an alternative title for Laetare Sunday, as is witnessed by the purple robes of Lent being replaced in some churches by rose-coloured ones. The 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia asserts that “the Golden Rose, sent by the Popes to Catholic sovereigns, used to be blessed at this time, and for this reason the day was sometimes called ‘Dominica de Rosa’.”

This Sunday was also once known as “the Sunday of the Five Loaves”, from the traditional Gospel reading for the day. Prior to the adoption of the modern “common” lectionaries, the Gospel reading for this Sunday in the Anglican, Roman Catholic, Western-Rite Orthodox, and Old Catholic churches was the story of the feeding of the five thousand (for instance, the Anglican Book of Common Prayer stipulates St John’s Gospel 6:5-14).

 

Dave Greenfield (the Stranglers)

Dave Greenfield, English Keyboard player with Punk Rock band The Stranglers) Was born 29 March 1949. The Stranglers  comprise of Hugh Cornwell, JeanJacques Burnel, Jet Black and Dave Greenfield. Scoring some 23 UK top 40 singles and 17 UK top 40 albums to date in a career spanning four decades, the Stranglers began life as the Guildford Stranglers on 11 September 1974 in Guildford, Surrey, they originally built a following within the mid-1970s pub rock scene. While their aggressive, no-nonsense playing and idiosyncratic approach put them at the forefront of the 1970’s punk scene, they rarely followed any single musical genre and the group went on to explore a variety of musical styles, from New Wave,art rock and gothic rock through the sophisticated pop of some of their 1980s output.They had major mainstream success with their single “Golden Brown”. Their other hits include “No More Heroes”, “Peaches”, “Always the Sun” and “Skin Deep”.

The Stranglers’ early sound was driven by Jean-Jacques Burnel’s melodic bass, and Dave Greenfield’s keyboards. Their early music was also characterised by the growling vocals and sometimes misanthropic lyrics of both Jean-Jacques Burnel and Hugh Cornwell. The group was originally called The Guildford Stranglers,and operated out of The Jackpot, a Guildford off-licence despite the name, none of the band came from Guildford. Hugh Cornwell was a blues musician prior to forming the band and had briefly been a bandmate of Richard Thompson, Burnel had been a classical guitarist who had performed with symphony orchestras,Jet Black was a jazz drummer, and Dave Greenfield had played at military bases in Germany. Their early influences included pre-punk psychedelic rock bands such as The Doors and The Music Machine. From 1976 the Stranglers became associated with the burgeoning punk rock movement. However the British musical press viewed the band with suspicion on account of their age and musical virtuosity and the intellectual bent of some of their lyrics. The band’s early albums, Rattus Norvegicus, No More Heroes and Black and White, all released within a period of 13 months, were highly successful with the record-buying public and singles such as “Peaches”, “Something Better Change” and “No More Heroes” became instant punk classics. Meanwhile, the band received a mixed reception from some critics because of their apparent sexist and racist innuendo. However,such criticism was oblivious to the satire and irony in the band’s music, writing: “the Stranglers themselves revelled in an almost Monty Python-esque grasp of absurdity (and, in particular, the absurdities of modern ‘men’s talk’).”

these albums went on to build a strong fan-following, In the later half of the 1970s, The Stranglers toured Japan twice, joining the alternative music scene of Tokyo, which was evolving from the punk sound of Kyoto based band 村八分 (Ostracism), whose music influence spread to Tokyo in 1971. The Stranglers were the only foreign band to take part in a landmark scene focussed around S-KEN Studio in Roppongi, and The Loft venues in Shinjuku and Shimokitazawa from 1977 to 1979 and got to know bands such as Friction and, Red Lizard, who they invited back to London, where the band became known as Lizard. In 1979, while still in Japan, Burnel also became close friends with the co-founder and drummer for ARB. At the end of 1983, ARB’s bassist was imprisoned, leaving the band with a problem for their forthcoming tour. Burnel took time out from The Stranglers to fly out to Japan at short notice and join ARB to cover the tour,including appearing at the ‘All Japan Rock Festival’ at Hibaya park, Burnel toured with ARB for 5 weeks and played on two studio tracks, “Yellow Blood” and “Fight it Out”, both of which appeared on the RCA Victor ARB album “Yellow Blood”.

In 1979, one of the Stranglers’ two managers advised them to break up as he felt that the band had lost direction, but this idea was dismissed and they parted company. Meanwhile Burnel released an experimental solo album Euroman Cometh backed by a small UK tour and Cornwell recorded the album Nosferatu in collaboration with Robert Williams. Later that year the Stranglers released The Raven, which heralded a transition towards a more melodic and complex sound which appealed more to the album- than the singles market. The songs on The Raven deal with subjects like a Viking’s lonely voyage, heroin addiction, genetic engineering, contemporary political events in Iran and Australia and extraterrestrial visitors, “The Meninblack”. The Raven saw a definite transition in the band’s sound. The Raven spawned one top 20 single, “Duchess”, with “Nuclear Device” reaching No.36 and the EP “Don’t Bring Harry” followed by “Bear Cage”, backed with “Shah Shah a Go Go”

The Stranglers’ next album The Gospel According to the Meninblack, a concept album exploring religion and the supposed connection between religious phenomena and extraterrestrial visitors. It was preceded by a single “Who Wants the World”. The Gospel According to The Meninblack was very different from their earlier work and alienated many fans. The track “Two sunspots wasplaced on The Gospel According to the Meninblack. the Stranglers followed up with La Folie (1981) which was another concept album, this time exploring the subject of love it featured the songs , “Let Me Introduce You to the Family”, and “Golden Brown” an evocative waltz-time ballad, with an extra beat in the fourth bar. Cornwell said the lyrics were “about heroin and also about a girl. Shortly afterwards the Stranglers released a greatest hits collection, The Collection 1977–1982 which ncluded the new single “Strange Little Girl”,in 1983 the Stranglers released Feline, which included the UK No. 9 hit “European Female”. The album was another change in musical direction, this time influenced by European music

1984 saw the release of Aural Sculpture which feature the three-piece horn-section which was retained in all their subsequent albums and live performances until Hugh Cornwell’s departure in 1990. Their 1986 album, Dreamtime, dealt with environmental concerns and featured the song”Always the Sun. The Stranglers’ final album with Cornwell, 10,  featured a cover of The Kinks’ “All Day and All of the Night” and another ’60s cover, “96 Tears” and, the follow-up singles”Sweet Smell of Success”  and”Man of the Earth”. In August 1990, founding member Hugh Cornwell left the band to pursue a solo career due to an increasingly acrimonious relationship with his fellow band-members, particularly Burnel. The remaining members recruited John Ellis, who had had a long-standing association with the band And had worked with Burnel and Greenfield in their side-project Purple Helmets, and been added to the Stranglers’ line-up as a touring guitarist a short time before Cornwell’s departure. This line-up recorded four albums: Stranglers in the Night (1992), About Time (1995), Written in Red (1997) and Coup de Grace (1998)

The Stranglers achieved something of a critical and popular renaissance in 2004 with the acclaimed Norfolk Coast album and a subsequent sell-out tour, together with their first Top-40 hit “Big Thing Coming”. In 2005, Coast to Coast: Live on Tour was released. On their sellout UK tour they were supported by “Goldblade”. In May 2006, Roberts left the band, leaving Burnel, Black, Greenfield and Warne, with the lead vocals shared between Warne and Burnel. Suite XVI, the follow-up album to Norfolk Coast, was released in September 2006 (the title is a pun on “Sweet 16” and also a reference to the fact that it was the band’s sixteenth studio album) and continued the band’s resurgence. It Features sounds from the band’s heavier punk roots,  country and western Johnny Cash pastiche/homage “I Hate You”

On 4 November 2007, the band (with Black) played a sell-out gig at the Roundhouse in Camden, North London, marking the thirtieth anniversary of their headline run at the same venue in 1977. The set list was the same as the 1977 concert, with the addition of a couple of more recent songs as a final encore. The event is recorded on the DVD Rattus at the Roundhouse. In mid-2008, The Stranglers played various major festivals around Europe. Barnard again filled in for Black at several gigs while Black continued his recuperation. However, Black was back with the band for their UK tour later in the year. In 2008, Jean-Jacques Burnel has made comments in interviews which indicate that the band could be heading into semi-retirement after the completion of their European tour in 2009. He said: “Our drummer Jet Black is 70 now. It blows me away, the fact that he continues to play 90-minute sets. He’s been unwell a couple of times and his drum tech has stood in at a few festivals, but if he was permanently out, well, I don’t know what I’d do, actually. We could still record, but this is our last big tour, I think. I think all things have to come to an end at some point, although we’ll do one more album. I would love to think it will be the most beautiful album we’ve done.”In 2009 the band played at the biggest open-air festival in Europe (400,000 – 500,000 rock fans every year) – Przystanek Woodstock inPoland

The Stranglers continued their resurgence, in 2010 with an extensive 16 date UK tour, I ncluding a sold-out return to the Hammersmith Apollo in March. A new double CD compilation album, Decades Apart, containing at least one track from their sixteen studio albums and two new tracks, “Retro Rockets” and “I Don’t See the World Like You Do” was released in February. The download version of Decades Apart included an unreleased recording from 1978, “Wasting Time”, inspired by the band’s ‘Rock Goes To College’ experience earlier that year; this track, originally titled “Social Secs” was never released, and the music ended up being reversed and released as “Yellowcake UF6”, the B-side to “Nuclear Device” in 1979. They also played a number of festivals, including Weyfest and Glastonbury and T in the Park in the UK and Oxegen 2010 in Ireland, and concerts in Japan, Greece, Poland, Slovakia and Bulgaria.

In May 2010 The band released a new live album and DVD, recorded at the Hammersmith Apollo and in March 2011, the band completed another UK tour. Supported by Burnel’s long term friend, Wilko Johnson, & The Wilko Johnson band. In April, the band began touring Europe, with many gigs and major festivals lined up for the entire year. The band started work on Suite XVI. The subsequent album Giants was released in 2012, containing their first instrumental since “Waltzinblack” on The Gospel According to The Meninblack. The “deluxe” version consisted of a second disc containing tracks from the ‘Weekend in Black’ acoustic session in November 2011. In 2013 the band played a full UK tour. Several festivals were booked for 2013, including a session at the BBC Proms on 12 August. For the North America tour, Black is no longer touring with Macaulay playing the entire show. In September 2014 the band celebrates their  fortieth anniversary and their big Ruby tour throughout the UK (22 dates) and Europe (16 dates) started on February 27th

The Stranglers live Alexandra Palace 1990 http://youtu.be/l1MoR3j5M_I

Jo Nesbo

16134936Glass key award winning Norwegian author and musician Jo Nesbø was born born 29 March 1960, he worked as a freelance journalist and a stockbroker before he began his writing career. As of March 2014 more than 3 million copies of his novels have been sold in Norway, and his work has been translated into over 40 languages, selling 23 million copies (2014). Nesbø is primarily known for his crime novels about Inspector Harry Hole, Which follow Harry Hole, a tough detective working for Crime Squad and later with the National Criminal Investigation Service (Kripos) who struggles with alcoholism and works on solving crimes in authentic locations in Oslo and elsewhere, from Australia to the Congo Republic.Hole takes on seemingly-unconnected cases, sometimes found to involve serial killers, bank robbers, gangsters or the establishment, but also spends a significant amount of time battling nightmares and his own demons. The Harry Hole novels are multi-layered, violent and often feature women in peril, as typified by The Snowman.

In 2007 Nesbø also released his first children’s book, Doktor Proktors Prompepulver (English translation: Doctor Proctor’s Fart Powder). The Doctor Proctor series follow the story of Doctor Proctor, a crazy professor waiting for his big break, his next-door neighbor Lise and her peculiar friend Bulle. The ruthless twins Truls and Trym Thrane sometimes lurk in the background. This series is reminiscent of Roald Dahl’s books. It deals with “the importance of being who you are and the ability of human creativity and imagination to give you the courage to do so.”

It has also been announced that, Nesbø has written at least three novels under the pen name Tom Johansen, provisionally entitled Blood on Snow, More Blood on the Water and The Kidnapping, scheduled to be published in autumn 2014 and spring 2015. Film studio Warner Brothers has also bought the rights to Blood on Snow and plan to make a screen adaptation, to be produced by and possibly starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Other Nesbo novels adapted Into films include the 2011 film Headhunters which is based on the novel Hodejegerne (the Headhunters). Future projects include A new TV crime drama series entitled Occupied, based on a concept by Jo Nesbø, is to be co-produced by Norway’s NRK and French-German network Arte. Yellow Bird, the Swedish production house responsible for the Wallander TV series, and the films Headhunters and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, has begun work on the first series of ten episodes. The series is described as a multi-layered political thriller which envisages what would happen if Norway were to be invaded by Russia in order to seize the nation’s oil resources. Aside from writing he is also the main vocalist and songwriter for the Norwegian rock band Di Derre.

 

Eric Idle (Monty Python)

imageBest known for his parts in the Monty Python Television Series and Films, the actor, writer and composer Eric Idle was born 29th March 1943. Eric Idle joined British sketch comedy series Monty Python alongside Graham Chapman , John Cleese, Terry Jones and Michael Palin. The first episode of British sketch comedy series Monty Python’s Flying Circus aired on BBC One on the 5th October 1969 and there were 45 Episodes spread over four seasons until December 1974 on BBC Television. The comedy was often pointedly intellectual, with numerous erudite references to philosophers and literary figures. The series followed and elaborated upon the style used by Spike Milligan in his groundbreaking series Q5. The team intended their humour to be impossible to categorise, and succeeded so completely that the adjective “Pythonesque” was invented to define it.

The shows were composed of surreality, risqué or innuendo-laden humour, sight gags and observational sketches without punchlines. They also featured Terry Gilliam’s wonderful and imaginatively bizarre animations, often sequenced or merged with live action. Broadcast by the BBC. with 45 episodes airing over four series from 1969 to 1974, The show often targets the idiosyncrasies of British life, especially that of professionals, and is at times politically charged, and over the years many of the sketches have attained classic status including The Lumberjack Song, Ministry of Silly Walks, Upper class twit of the Year,Spam song, The Dead Parrot Sketch (Bleedin’ demised, Joined the choir invisible 😀 and Bicycle Repair Man.

The members of Monty Python are all highly educated. Terry Jones and Michael Palin are Oxford University graduates; Eric Idle, John Cleese, and Graham Chapman attended Cambridge University; and American-born member Terry Gilliam is an Occidental College graduate. Chapman also played the lead roles in two of the Python’s Films – Monty Python and The Holy Grail, Life of Brian. In addition to mo Python Eric Idle also appeared in the the children’s series Do Not Adjust Your Set, alongside Terry Jones, Michael Palin and Terry Gilliam’s surreal animations which linked the show’s sketches together, and defined Monty Python’s visual language in other media (such as LP and book covers, and the title sequences of their films). Since Monty Python split Idle has also appeared in Many films including Nuns on the Run and National Lampoons European Vacation.

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL http://youtu.be/Iw4le4xXNDU

Severn Valley Railway

imageThe Severn Valley Railway has announced a new four day format for this years Autumn Steam Gala between Thursday 18 September and Sunday 21 September 2014, and the first visiting locomotive confirmed isThe Fowler 4F 0-6-0 tender locomotive No. 43924 courtesy of the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway.This is No. 43924’s first visit to the SVR and its first journey south in 46 years. There is also a new Autumn Gala Preview Day which takes place on Thursday 18 September giving steam fans the opportunity to see the locomotives at the start of the Autumn Steam Gala

There will also be an opportunity for Steam Enthusiasts to try their hand at driving and firing a steam locomotive between Bewdley and Kidderminster as part of the Footplate Experience. Another exciting visitor to the Railway for the 2014 Summer season is the the British Railways Standard 5MT 4-6-0 No. 73129 which will be making it’s debut on the Severn Valley Railway in April, from the Midland Railway Centre at Butterley the locomotive will initially operate on the line for a three month period hauling the summer passenger services. The locomotive is unusual in that it is one of only a few to feature Caprotti Valvegear instead of the usual walschaerts Valvegear. Visitors to this years Autumn Steam Gala also have the chance to amble along the Severn Valley in a brake van as part of our heritage goods train.

Severn Valley Railway Footplate Experience has also announced an exciting and unique partnership with 3 Wheel Drive limited and Morgan Motors, giving people the chance to drive a steam locomotive AND an iconic Morgan three-wheeler all in one day. The Bolt on Morgan Experience is being offered with introductory footplate experience on selected dates throughout the year allowing visitors to take the controls of a Morgan three wheeler for two hours and providing the perfect Heritage Transport Experience package. For details contact Highley Station’s Visitor Centre, The Engine House.

The Severn Valley Railway will also appear on BBC Countryfile following the filming that took place in January this year. Originally due to be aired last month, the episode was postponed due to a special feature on the floods but has now been rescheduled.

The Quarry by Iain Banks

imageOver the past few months The Telegraph newspaper with WHSmith has been offering readers some really great fiction and this week’s novel is The Quarry by Iain Banks, newly released in paperback. The Quarry was the last book published by Iain Banks before his death in 2013. Readers can claim the book for just £2.99 (RRP £7.99) between Thursday, March 27 and Wednesday, April 2, or bring in one of the printed vouchers published in the paper on Thursday, March 27 or Saturday, March 29 which is valid until Wednesday 2 April.

The Quarry features a socially awkward and mildly autistic 18 year old named named Kit who never knew his mother is, but does know, that his misanthropic father, Guy, is dying of cancer. Feeling his death is imminent, Guy gathers around him his oldest friends – or at least the friends with the most to lose by his death. Paul – the rising star in the Labour party who dreads the day a tape they all made at university might come to light; Alison and Robbie, corporate bunnies whose relationship is daily more fractious; Pris and Haze, once an item, now estranged, and finally Hol – friend, mentor, former lover and the only one who seemed to care.

But what will happen to Kit when Guy is gone? And why isn’t Kit’s mother in the picture? As the friends reunite for Guy’s last days, old jealousies, affairs and lies come to light as Kit watches obsessively analytical observing events (watching from the perspective of youth the way these friendships have either endured or been dropped) it becomes obvious that he is the key character who stands to lose the most out of all of them.

Ferdinand Porsche

porsche_-cisitalia360Austrian technical automobile designer and automaker-entrepreneur Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porsche sadly passed away at the age of 88, on 27 March 1998, at Zell am See, Austria. Born 19 September 1909, mainly known as Ferry Porsche. His father, Ferdinand Porsche, Sr. was also a renowned automobile engineer and founder of Volkswagen and Porsche. His nephew, Dr. Ferdinand Piëch, was chairman of Volkswagen from 1993 to 1998, and his son, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, was involved in the design of the 911. Ferdinand Porsche Sr was chief designer at Austro-Daimler in Austria. His designs were focused on compact street cars and race cars. Austro-Daimler was so strongly tied to the local royalty that the Austrian double-headed eagle became the trademark of the company. Ferry Porsche learned to drive when he was only 10 years old. At age 12 he drove a real race car, the Austro-Daimler Sascha, which had just won its class at Targa Florio, Sicily, in 1922 and also attended school at Wiener Neustadt and Stuttgart, concentrating on mathematics. In 1923, the family moved to Stuttgart, due to senior Ferdinand Porsche’s unrest about the squandering financial destiny of Austro-Daimler. He joined the Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft at Stuttgart-Untertürkheim (where the design department from the whole company was concentrated). Soon, he achieved the position of technical director. Meanwhile, Ferry Porsche received consent from the company to stay at the plant together with his father because of his increasing interest in design issues.

Ferdinand Porsche senior enjoyed success particularly with his racing cars . His personal preference for designing compact cars differed to Daimler-Benz, who were in favor of more luxurious models. So he left and worked temporarily as the technical director of Steyr AG in Austria and then decided to open a consulting office of automobile design, in Stuttgart which had become a important part of Germany’s automobile industry and was therefor an ideal location for the new Porsche design company and soon Porsche GmbH was founded. Despite Germany’s financial crisis during the 1930′s Porsche managed to obtained contracts from important German automotive firms, such as Wanderer, Auto Union, Zwickau, Zündapp and Some of these projects had historical impact, such as the mid-engine Auto Union Silver Arrow race cars, which were designed by Porsche.

volkswagen-beetle3During the 1930′s German racing cars were promoted. Daimler-Benz constructed a racing car & In 1933 Ferry Porsche also constructed a rival Porsche race cars, which had a 4.5 litre V-16 engine and an aluminum framework.In 1934, Auto Union was created, and the senior Porsche became the chief designer and they too designed racing cars. Both racing teams, Daimler-Benz and Auto Union soon became bitter rival on the Race Track during the 1930′s. In 1938, when his father moved to the new Volkswagen plant at Wolfsburg, Ferry became deputy manager of the Stuttgart bureau and relocated the design departments to Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen. Ferdinand Porsche’s old yearning had been to create a small compact & affordable car for the German family. So Work began at Stuttgart and the car became known as the Kdf-Wagen or Volkswagen (people’s car). During World War II Porsche seemed to develop a relatively “amicable” relationship with Adolf Hitler and Even though the relationship seemed mutual, in reality it was one-sided and The Porsche family was, in fact, somewhat pacifist and did not agree with Nazi ideals and may have even assisted Jewish employee to escape Germany, including Adolf Rosenberger, without whose financial backing Porsche GmbH would not have existed. After World War II both Porsche’s father and son as well as Anton Piëch were arrested as war criminals and a bail of 500,000 francs was officially asked for each of the Porsche’s. It could be afforded only for Ferry Porsche who moved then to Austria, in July 1946. His father was taken instead to a harsh medieval prison at Dijon, upon release he attempted to return to Stuttgart but he was barred by the forces of occupation. In consequence, in July 1946, he brought all the structure of the company to Gmünd/Carinthia, Austria & obtained two contracts for automobile design. One was for the construction of racecars for the Cisitalia racing team. The other was for the design of their own car, which later became known as the Porsche 356. , Ferry Porsche started producing Grand Prix racing cars again. The new model was called the Porsche 360 Cisitalia, and It had a supercharged mid-mounted engine displacing 1.5 liters and four-wheel drive.

Porsche356SpeedsterFerdinand Porsche also designed the Porsche 356, based on the compact Volkswagen. The 356 had an air-cooled, rear-mounted, 4-cylinder engine producing 35 hp. Despite the car’s compact size, it proved very popular and by 1965 had sold nearly 78,000 units, which was helped by Ferdinand Porsche’s mottos to produce automobiles which had to be reliable and of high-quality sports cars, of a high utilitarian value. Porsche ‘s most recognized involvement in car races began at 24 Hours of Le Mans, on June 1951, when an improved version of the 356 debuted on this track and won in its category. On successive years, Porsche ‘s winning contribution to Le Mans is regarded as fundamental for the own existence of the circuit. Later, in 1959, Porsche won for first time an event of the World Sportscar Championship, at Targa Florio, while a Porsche 917 would achieve the first Le Mans win finally in 1970.

PorscheCarerraAt the demand of Porsche’s fans, the company began planning a successor to the 356. The project was originally called Porsche 901 and The first units were manufactured in 1962. However, Peugeot pushed legally for a change of the name, due to its registered trademark on automobile names with a zero amid two numbers. The model was renamed Porsche 911. Over time, it has evolved, but still kept the general shape and architecture since the beginning with a rear mounted high performance engine. It has sold about 600,000 units. After his father’s death in 1951 Ferry became general manager, the chairman of the board of management and In 1972, he decided to transform the Porsche Companyinto a public concern. In 1989, Ferdinand Porsche stepped down from the chairmanship and became honorary chairman of the supervisory board and remained in that position until his death In 1998 and Ferdinand Alexander Porsche took his place as general manager. when Ferdinand Porsche retired definitively from the activity, returning to his cherished Austrian farm at Zell am See. one of his last visited events was the launching of a new model, the Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet. It was based on the old 356, with a water-cooled engine of 6-cylinders and 300 hp.He also assisted in the celebration of the 30 years of the Porsche 911 which took place at Stuttgart and Ludwigsburg. He was buried there at the Schüttgut church.