I am Malala by Malala Youdafzai

I would like to read Malala Yousafzai’s inspirational memoir I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban, which is written by Malala Yousafzai, and co-written by Britsh Journalist Christina Lamb. It starts In 2009 when young Malala Yousafzai began writing a blog on BBC Urdu about her difficult life in the Swat Valley as the Taliban gained control, at times banning girls from attending school. When her identity was discovered, Malala began to appear in both Pakistani and international media, advocating the freedom to pursue education for all.

In October 2012, while Malala was returning from school on the school bus gunmen boarded It and shot her in the face, a bullet passing through her head and into her shoulder. Remarkably, Malala survived the shooting and thanks to her bravery she become worldwide symbol of hope for oppressed women fighting for education and other human rights. She also spoke at the United Nations and become youngest ever nominee for the Peace Nobel Prize.

Malala’s evocation of place, beautifully and lovingly described, and her paean to her father with his own passion for education, are fascinating. But so is her toughness. She describes seeing a young girl selling oranges, clearly unable to read or write: “I took a photo of her and vowed I would do everything in my power to help educate girls just like her. This was the war I was going to fight.” This remarkable book is part memoir, part manifesto.

Malala’s voice has the purity, but also the rigidity, of the principled. Whether she is being a competitive teenager and keeping track of who she beat in exams (and by how much) or writing about the blog for the BBC that catapulted her on to the international stage … or talking about Pakistan’s politicians (“useless”), Malala is passionate and intense. Her faith and her duty to the cause of girls’ education is unquestionable, her adoration for her father – her role model and comrade in arms – is moving and her pain at the violence carried out in the name of Islam is palpable. This is a story about courage, and the impossible things that can be achieved, and it demonstrates that the human spirit cannot be suppressed by any prohibitions,

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