The Taxidermists Daughter by Kate Mosse

I would also like to read The Taxidermists Daughter which has been described as Another superbly atmospheric gothic thriller by Kate Mosse. The novel features Connie Gifford, the titular taxidermists daughter, who lives with her father in Blackthorn House, a decaying house in the coastal town of Fishbourne ON the Sussex Coast, Which was once a world-famous museum of taxidermy. Connie has learnt and appreciates her Fathers art of Taxidermy but Sadly though The stuffed birds that used to grace every parlour are out of fashion, leaving Mr Gifford a disgraced and bitter man. The string of tragic events that led to the museum’s closure are never spoken of and an accident has robbed Connie of any memory of those days.

She learns from the Superstitious locals that If you go to a Churchyard at Midnight, the ghosts of the next years dead are supposed to appear. So she goes to the graveyard of the church of St. Peter and St Mary on midnight on April 24,1912, however, as The bell begins to toll and all eyes are fixed on the church nobody notices the gloved hands holding a garotte. As the last notes fade into the dark, a woman lies dead in the Churchyard, and a cloud of songbirds -green finches and linnets – suddenly rush out of the church.

Elsewhere as the town braces itself against rising waters and the highest tide of the season, Connie struggles to discover who is responsible – and why the incident is causing memories to surface from her own vanished years. She is also keen to learn the identity of the mysterious figure watching from the marshes and to discover the secret that lies at the heart of Blackthorn House, hidden among the bell jars of her father’s workshop?

Bootsy Collins (Funkadelic)

American singer-songwriter andfun k bass player (Parliament-FunkadelicWilliam Earl “Bootsy” Collins was (born October 26, 1951 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA). Rising to prominence with James Brown in the early 1970s, and later with Parliament-Funkadelic, Collins’s driving bass guitar and humorous vocals established him as one of the leading names in funk.Collins is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, inducted in 1997 with fifteen other members of Parliament-Funkadelic.

clintonhardcoreWith his elder brother Phelps “Catfish” Collins, Frankie “Kash” Waddy and Philippé Wynne, Collins formed a funk band called The Pacemakers in 1968.In March 1970, after most of the members of James Brown’s band quit over a pay dispute, The Pacemakers were hired as Brown’s backing band and they became known as The J.B.’s. (They are often referred to as the “original” J.B.’s to distinguish them from later line-ups that went by the same name.) Although they worked for Brown for only 11 months, the original J.B.’s played on some of Brown’s most intense funk recordings, including “Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine”, “Bewildered(1970)”, “Super Bad”, “Soul Power”, “Talkin’ Loud and Sayin’ Nothing”, and two instrumental singles, the much-sampled “The Grunt” and “These Are the J.B.’s”.After parting ways with James Brown, Bootsy returned to Cincinnati and formed House Guests with his brother Phelps Collins, Rufus Allen, Clayton “Chicken” Gunnels, Frankie Waddy, Ronnie Greenaway and Robert McCullough. The House Guests released “What So Never the Dance” and another single on the House Guests label, as well as a third as The Sound of Vision on the House Guests label.Next Collins moved to Detroit, after Philippé Wynne suggested joining The Spinners, for whom Wynne had been singing. However, following the advice of singer and future Parliament member Mallia Franklin Bootsy had another choice. Franklin there introduced both Collins brothers to George Clinton, and 1972 saw both of the Collins brothers, along with Waddy, join Funkadelic. Bootsy played bass on most of Funkadelic and all of Parliament’s albums (with the exception of Osmium) through the early 1980s, garnering several songwriting credits as well.In 1976 Bootsy, Catfish, Waddy, Joel Johnson, Gary “Mudbone” Cooper, Robert Johnson and The Horny Horns formed Bootsy’s Rubber Band, a separate touring unit of Clinton’s P-Funk collective. The group recorded five albums together, the first three of which are often considered to be among the quintessential P-Funk recordings. The group’s 1978 album Bootsy? Player of the Yearreached the top of the R&B album chart and spawned the #1 R&B single “Bootzilla”.Like Clinton, Bootsy took on several alter egos, from Casper the Funky Ghost to Bootzilla, “the world’s only rhinestone rockstar monster of a doll”, all as parts of the evolving character of an alien rock star who grew gradually more bizarre as time went on . He also adopted his trademark “space bass” around this time.

funkadelic-75-lets-take-it-to-the-stageBootsy released two 1980 albums, his first “solo” album “Ultra-Wave”, and Sweat Band, on George Clinton’s Uncle Jam label with a group billed as Bootsy’s Sweat Band. He also was credited for producing the debut of P-Funk spinoffs Zapp and Roger.In 1984, Bootsy collaborated with Jerry Harrison of Talking Heads to produce “Five Minutes”, a dance record sampled and edited from Ronald Reagan’s infamous “Five Minutes” speech. The record was credited to “Bonzo goes to Washington” (also referenced in the 1985 Ramones song “Bonzo goes to Bitburg”, derived from Reagan’s starring role as Professor Peter Boyd in the 1951 comedy film Bedtime for Bonzo).After a nearly five-year hiatus, Bootsy had a comeback in 1988 (with some help from producer Bill Laswell). What’s Bootsy Doin’?flaunted a new sound that foreshadowed the 90’s, such as the dancefloor smash “Party On Plastic”. Laswell introduced Bootsy to Herbie Hancock, resulting in Perfect Machine. The techno-funk they recorded featured turnables for scratch appeal, and the smoothly-stylized vocals of Leroy “Sugarfoot” Bonner of chart-topping Ohio Players.In 1990, Bootsy collaborated with Deee-Lite on their massive hit “Groove Is in the Heart” where he contributed additional vocals. Although he also appeared in the music video playing the bass, the bassline in the song is actually a sample of a Herbie Hancocksong called “Bring Down the Birds”. Bootsy’s Rubber Band became the defacto backing musicians for Deee-Lite during a world tour. The Rubber Band also recorded the EP “Jungle Bass”, their first recording in 11 years.In 1992, Bootsy joined with guitarist Stevie Salas and drummer Buddy Miles to form the funk-metal fusion group Hardware. The trio released one album, Third Eye Open, before disbanding.Bootsy collaborated with bluegrass legends Del McCoury, Doc Watson and Mac Wiseman to form the GrooveGrass Boyz. They produced a fusion of bluegrass and funk.In 1994, Bootsy contributed extensively to the Soup Dragons’ last album, Hydroponic.Bootsy’s New Rubber Band formed this year, releasing “Blasters of the Universe”.In 1995, Bootsy played in the remake of Jimi Hendrix’s “If 6 Was 9,” for Axiom Funk, a Funkadelic-like one-off supergroup produced by Bill Laswell and featuring (Funkadelic members) George Clinton, Bernie Worrell, Bootsy Collins, (the guitar of the late) Eddie Hazel, Gary Shider and Bill Laswell. The group released only one album, and the song also appeared in the soundtrack of the movieStealing Beauty.Bootsy’s New Rubber Band put forth the live release “Keepin’ dah Funk Alive 4-1995″, recorded over two nights in Tokyo.In 1996, Bootsy collaborated on George Clinton’s album “The Awesome Power Of A Fully Operational Mothership”.

FunkadelicMotorCityIn 2000 Bootsy Collins served as “Heineken’s Amsterjam 2005″ curator and master of ceremonies and appeared with Madonna, Iggy Pop, Little Richard, and The Roots’ Questlove, in an American TV commercial e.Bootsy has collaborated extensively with Bill Laswell and made appearances on two Fatboy Slim records Illuminati, as well as reading a poem at the end of FatBoy Slims’s release in the LateNightTales DJ mix series. Bootsy provided “vocal spice” on theTobyMac album Welcome to Diverse City. He also appears on Nicole C. Mullens’ latest album, Everyday People. He has also worked with the Lo-Fidelity Allstars on the album Don’t be Afraid of Love, with Praxis, and with Buckethead on several occasions, Bootsy was featured in the 2002 film Standing in the Shadows of Motown. In 2004 he appeared on Snoop Dogg’s Rhythm & Gangsta album and on the cover of “The Joker” on the Fatboy Slim albumPalookavilleHe also performed a cover of the “Power of Soul” on the 2004 tribute album Power of Soul: A Tribute to Jimi Hendrix’..In October 2005, Collins co-wrote a song celebrating the resurgence of his hometown team, the Cincinnati Bengals called “Fear Da Tiger” which features several Bengals players, . An edited version of the song was made into amusic video which features cameos by many other Bengals players. Collins appeared with Little Richard, Bernie Worrell as the band playing with Hank Williams, Jr. during for the 2006 season. He also sings “Marshal Law”, the theme song of the Cincinnati Marshals indoor football team. .In 2006, ABC Entertainment / A Charly Films Release released a DVD/CD from Bootsy Collins and the New Rubber Band’s concert at the 1998 North Sea Jazz Festival.Later that same year, Bootsy released the holiday album “Christmas Is 4 Ever”. The album features re-workings of Christmas standards as well as original compositions.Also in 2006, Collins recorded music for the animated television series Loonatics Unleashed. Collins also voiced the character Bootes Belinda in the episode The Music Villain.[4]In April 2007, Bootsy announced plans to begin a restaurant/club with Cincinnati area restaurateur Jeff Ruby called “Bootsy’s.” The venue operated 2008-2010 before closing. It featured live musical acts, a museum dedicated to Bootsy’s musical career and Spanish, Central and South American cuisine.In June 2007, Bootsy Collins, along with Phelps Collins, Clyde Stubblefield, John “Jabo” Starks, and Bernie Worrell, participated in the recording of the soundtrack for the movie Superbad. In December of that year they went on to perform the first tribute concert remembering James Brown.

In July 2007, Bootsy was working on a project Science Faxtion and an album called Living On Another Frequency. The band also features guitarist Buckethead and drummer Brain.The album was released in November 2008.Collins promoted Rock the Vote for its 2008 campaign together with Buckethead.Bootsy produced Junkyard Waltz by Freekbass. His influence in popular culture is seen in a number of television series. In The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air episode “Sooooooul Train”, Geoffrey sneaks into the Soul Train tapings posing as Bootsy Collins, while in The Mighty Boosh episode “The Legend of Old Gregg” an alien creature named ‘The Funk’ lands on Bootsy’s house, giving him his ability to play the bass guitar “like some kinda delirious funky priest”, as well as the ability to see around corners. His song I’d Rather Be With You, from the album Stretchin’ Out In Bootsy’s Rubber Band was featured in the movie Baby Boy i. Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea, cited Collins as one of his primary influences, & appeared in unmistakably Bootsy-esque clothing in the video for RHCP’s “Dani California”, and Bootsy’s “What’s a Telephone Bill?” was sampled for 2Pac’s “Str8 Ballin’” track off the THUG LIFE album.In 2009 Collins collaborated with Talib Kweli and Hi-Tek on the track “Internet Connection”‘ ln October 2010 Bootsy was awarded a Bass Player Magazine Lifetime Achievement Award at the Key Club in Los Angeles.In March 2011 Bootsy and his wife visited Franklin L. Williams M.S #7’s Little Kids Rock program.On 15 April 2011, Bootsy appeared on Later… with Jools Holland, performing a memorable snippet of funk with Jools.In June 2011 Bootsy played the 10th Annual Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, TN.In the Fall of 2011,

Rock Lobster

Keith Strickland, American guitarist and songwriter (With American New Wave band,The B-52’s)Was born 26 October 195 The B-52s were formed in Athens, Georgia in 1976. The original line-up consisted of Fred Schneider(vocals, percussion, keyboards), Kate Pierson (organ, bass, vocals), Cindy Wilson(vocals, bongos, tambourine, guitar), Ricky Wilson (guitars), and Keith Strickland(drums, guitars, synthesizers, various instruments) and cowbell player, poet and vocalist Fred Schneider played an impromptu musical jam session after sharing a tropical Flaming Volcano drink at a local Athens Chinese restaurant. Other ideas they had to name their band were the “Tina-Trons” and “Felini’s Children”. When they first jammed, Strickland played guitar and Wilson played congas. They later played their first concert (with Wilson playing guitar) in 1977 at a Valentine’s Day party for their friends.

The band’s name comes from a particular beehive hairdo resembling the nose cone of the aircraft of the same name. Keith Strickland suggested the name after a dream he had had one night, of a band performing in a hotel lounge. In the dream he heard someone whisper in his ear that the name of the band was “the B-52s.” The band’s quirky take on the new wave sound of their era was a combination of dance and surf music set apart from their contemporaries by the unusual guitar tunings used by Ricky Wilson and thrift-store chic. Their first single, “Rock Lobster”, recorded  in 1978, was an underground success, which led to the B-52’s performing at CBGB and Max’s Kansas City in New York City. A rerecorded version of Rock Lobster was released as a single. In the UK and Germany it was backed with Running Around (Instrumental),  which appeared on their second album Wild Planet. The buzz created by the record in the UK meant their first show in London at the Electric Ballroom, London, was packed in anticipation, with many UK pop stars such as Sandie Shaw, Green Gartside from Scritti Politti, Joe Jackson, and others in attendance. In Canada, released on the Warner Bros. label, the single went from cult hit to bona fide smash, eventually going on to reach the No. 1 position in the RPM-compiled national chart on May 24, 1980.

In 1979 The B-52’s signed contracts with Warner Bros. Records for North America, South America, Australia, and New Zealand; and with Island Records for the UK, Europe, and Asia. Chris Blackwell, founder of Island, produced their debut studio album. Recorded at Blackwell’s Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas, and released on July 6, 1979, The B-52’s contained re-recorded versions of “Rock Lobster” and “52 Girls”, six originals recorded solely for the album, and a remake of the Petula Clark single “Downtown”. According to the band interview on the DVD With the Wild Crowd! Live in Athens, GA, the band was surprised by Blackwell’s recording methods; he wanted to keep the sound as close as possible to their actual live sound so used almost no overdubs or additional effects. The album was a major success for the band, especially in Australia where it reached number three on the charts alongside its three singles “Planet Claire”, “Rock Lobster”, and “Dance This Mess Around”. In the United States, the single “Rock Lobster” reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while the album itself was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The follow-up, Wild Planet, reached number eighteen on the Billboard 200 chart in 1980 and was certified gold. “Private Idaho” became their second Hot 100 entry. On January 26, 1980, The B-52’s performed on Saturday Night Live. They also performed at the Heatwave festival (billed as the “New Wave Woodstock”) in Toronto, Canada in August 1980; and appeared in the Paul Simon film One Trick Pony. Their third release was a remix of tracks from their first two studio albums. Party Mix! took six tracks from the first two LPs and presented them in extended forms. John Lennon cited “Rock Lobster” as an inspiration for his comeback. In 1981 the band collaborated with musician David Byrne to produce a third full-length studio album. Due to alleged conflicts with Byrne over the album’s musical direction recording sessions for the album were aborted, prompting the band to release Mesopotamia (1982) as an extended play (EP), in 1991, Party Mix! and Mesopotamia, the latter of which had been remixed, were combined and released together on a single compact disc. In 1983 the band released their fourth album Whammy!; this album brought the band into synthesizer and drum machine experimentation. The album entered the Billboard 200 chart in 1983, reaching number twenty-nine during the year. “Legal Tender” reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart, as well as the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play Singles chart alongside “Whammy Kiss” and “Song for a Future Generation”. After initial pressings of Whammy! were released, copyright issues with Yoko Ono led to the song “Don’t Worry” being removed and replaced on future pressings by “Moon 83”, a remixed version of the track “There’s a Moon in the Sky (Called the Moon)” from their debut album.

After taking a one year absence from their musical careers in 1984 The B-52’s regrouped in 1985 to record Bouncing off the Satellites, their fifth studio record, and in January of that year they performed in Brazil, at Rock in Rio; their largest crowd ever. During the recording, guitarist Wilson had been suffering from AIDS/HIV-related health complications. None of the other band members were aware of his illness. In an interview, fellow band member Kate Pierson stated that Wilson had kept his illness secret from his fellow band members because he “did not want anyone to worry about him or fuss about him.” On October 12, 1985 Wilson died from the illness, at the age of 32. With Cindy Wilson devastated by her brother’s death, and her bandmates too being depressed about Ricky’s passing, the band went into seclusion and did not tour to promote their album nor the group, prompting a hiatus from their musical careers. In 1987 they released a public service announcement in the style of The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover on behalf of AMFAR (The Foundation for AIDS Research).

Following Ricky Wilson’s death in 1985 Strickland switched full-time to guitar. The band subsequently added various musicians for their live shows. This included Sara Lee or Tracy Wormworth on (bass),Zachary Alford or Sterling Campbell on (drums, percussion) and Pat Irwin or Paul Gordon (keyboards & guitars).Rooted in new wave and 1960s rock and roll, the group later covered many genresranging from post-punk to pop rock. The “guy vs. gals” vocals of Schneider, Pierson, and Wilson, sometimes used in call and response style (“Strobe Light,” “Private Idaho”, and “Good Stuff”), are a trademark. Presenting themselves as a positive, fun, enthusiastic, slightly oddball and goofy party band, the B-52’s tell tall tales, glorify wild youth and celebrate sexy romance.