George R.R.Martin

American fantasy, horror and science fiction Novellist and short story writer George Raymond Richard Martin was born September 20, 1948. As a boy He began writing and selling monster stories for pennies to other neighborhood children, dramatic readings included. He also wrote stories about a mythical kingdom populated by his pet turtles; the turtles died frequently in their toy castle, so he finally decided they were killing each other off in “sinister plots”. Martin attended Mary Jane Donohoe School and then later Marist High School. While there he became an avid comic-book fan, developing a strong interest in the innovative superheroes being published by Marvel Comics and joined the fledgling comics fandom of the era, writing fiction for various fanzines and winning the Alley Award in 1965 for his prose superhero story “Powerman vs. The Blue Barrier”, the first of many awards he would go on to win for his fiction. In 1970 Martin earned a B. S. in Journalism from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, graduating summa cum laude; he went on to complete his M. S. in Journalism in 1971, also from Northwestern. Martin became a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War, and did alternative service work for two years (1972–1974) as a VISTA volunteer, attached to the Cook County Legal Assistance Foundation. An expert chess player, he also directed chess tournaments for the Continental Chess Association from 1973 to 1976. Then from 1976 to 1978 he was an English and journalism instructor at Clarke University (then Clarke College) in Dubuque, IA, becoming Writer In Residence at the college from 1978 to 1979. He became a full time writer After the sudden death of friend and fellow author Tom Reamy in the fall of 1977 and resigned from his job, and moved to Santa Fe in 1979.

At the Age of 21 Martin began selling science fiction short stories professionally. His first sale was “The Hero” and His first story to be nominated for the Hugo Award and Nebula Awards was With Morning Comes Mistfall, published in 1973 in Analog magazine. Between 1977 and 1979 Martin became the Southwest Regional Director for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and from 1996 to 1998, he served as its vice-president.In 1976 Martin was nominated for two Hugo Awards at the 34th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), but lost both awards, to the novelette “…and Seven Times Never Kill Man” and the novella The Storms of Windhaven, co-written with Lisa Tuttle.

Although Martin often writes fantasy or horror, a number of his earlier works are science fiction tales occurring in a loosely defined future history, known informally as “The Thousand Worlds” or “The Manrealm”. He has also written at least one piece of political-military fiction, “Night of the Vampyres”, collected in Harry Turtledove’s anthology The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century and, The Armageddon Rag. In 1983 Martin was hired as a staff writer and then as an Executive Story Consultant, for the revival of the Twilight Zone. Martin also worked on Max Headroom and created the show’s “Ped Xing” character (the president of the Zic Zak corporation, Network 23’s primary sponsor). However the show was canceled in the middle of its second season. Martin was then hired for the fantasy Beauty and the Beast writing 14 of its episodes.

He also oversaw development of the multi-author Wild Cards book series, which takes place in a shared universe in which a small slice of post–World War II humanity gains superpowers after the release of an alien-engineered virus; new titles are still being published in the on-going series from Tor Books. In Second Person Martin “gives a personal account of the close-knit role-playing game (RPG) culture that gave rise to his Wild Cards shared-world anthologies”. Martin’s own contributions to Wild Cards have included Thomas Tudbury, “The Great and Powerful Turtle” – a powerful psychokinetic whose flying “shell” consisted of an armored VW Beetle. Other titles in the series include Low Ball and High Stakes. Martin’s novella, Nightflyers, was adapted into a 1987 feature film of the same title.

In 1991 Martin briefly returned to writing novels and began what would eventually turn into his epic fantasy series: A Song of Ice and Fire, which was inspired by the Wars of the Roses and Ivanhoe. It is currently intended to comprise seven volumes, including Game of Thrones, A Song of Ice and Fire and A Feast for Crows, which became The New York Times No. 1 Bestseller and The Wall Street Journal no 1 bestseller. A Feast for Crows was also nominated for both a Quill Award and the British Fantasy Award. The fifth book Dance with Dragons, was published July 12, 2011, and quickly became an international bestseller, including achieving a No. 1 spot on the New York Times Bestseller List and In 2012, A Dance With Dragons made the final ballot for science fiction and fantasy’s Hugo Award, World Fantasy Award, Locus Poll Award, and the British Fantasy Award and won the Locus Poll Award for Best Fantasy Novel. Two more novels are planned and still being written in the Ice and Fire series: The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring.

He is also a screenwriter and television producer andis best known for A Song of Ice and Fire, his international bestselling series of epic fantasy novels which HBO adapted for its dramatic series Game of thrones after acquiring the television rights for the entire Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007. Titled Game of Thrones, it ran weekly for ten episodes, each approximately an hour long.Although busy completing A Dance With Dragons and other projects, George R. R. Martin was heavily involved in the production of the television series adaptation of his books he also participated in scriptwriting; the opening credits list him as a co-executive producer of the series. The first season was nominated for 13 Emmy Awards, ultimately winning two, one for its opening title credits and one for Peter Dinklage as Best Supporting Actor.

The second season of ten episodes, based on the second Ice and Fire novel A Clash of Kings, was nominated for 12 Emmy Awards, including another Supporting Actor nomination for Dinklage. It went on to win six of those Emmys in the Technical Arts categories. The first season of 10 episodes was also nominated for a 2012 Hugo Award, fantasy and science fiction’s oldest award, presented by the World Science Fiction Society each year at the annual Worldcon; the show went on to win the 2012 Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation, at the 70th World Science Fiction Convention, in Chicago, IL; Martin took home one of the three Hugo Award trophies. The second season episode “Blackwater”, written by George R.R. Martin, won the Hugo Award at the 71st World Science Fiction Convention, in San Antonio, Texas. Martin serves as the series’ co-executive producer, and In 2005 Lev Grossman of Time called Martin “the American Tolkien” and in 2011 Time Magazine listed him as one of the “most influential people in the world.”

Banned Books Week

BookThis years Banned Books Week starts Sunday 20 September 2015. It has been held annually since 1982, during the last full week in September And highlights the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals. It also stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of those unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints to all who wish to read them” and the requirement to keep material publicly available so that people can develop their own conclusions and opinions. Banned Books Week was founded in 1982 by prominent First Amendment and library activist Judith Krug. It is sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA), the American Booksellers Association, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression (ABFFE), American Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of American Publishers, National Association of College Stores, and endorsed by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

Banned Books Week encourages readers to examine challenged literary works, and promotes intellectual freedom in libraries, schools, and bookstores. Its goal is “to teach the importance of our rights and the power of literature, and to draw attention to the danger that exists when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society. Many educational facilities also celebrate banned and challenged books during this week, often creating displays and programs around the awareness campaign. Additionally, various booksellers sponsor activities and events in support of Banned Books Week. Such as creating window displays, and inviting authors of banned and challenged materials to come speak at their stores, as well as funding annual essay contests about freedom of speech.

Amnesty International also celebrates Banned Books Week by highlighting individuals who have been persecuted because of the writings that they produce, circulate or read. And documents cases annually which show individuals who have been reportedly killed, incarcerated, or otherwise harassed by national authorities around the world, because of their writings. Amnesty International also urges people to “take action” by contacting authorities regarding human rights violations and also provide updates to cases from previous years, giving a history and current status of people who have been allegedly persecuted for their writings in Azerbaijan, China, Cuba, Egypt, Gambia, Iran, Myanmar, Russia, and Sri Lanka. The event has also been praised for celebrating the freedom provided by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. The international event held by Amnesty International has also been praised for reminding people about the price that some people pay for expressing controversial views.

However A number of books on the list have been simply challenged (primarily by parents for violence, language, sexuality, or age-appropriateness), rather than banned outright and removed. Many have alleged that the censorship being protested in the event does not exist, and that books are not banned in the United States, Although there are hundreds of documented attempts to suppress access to information that take place each year across the U.S., where libraries are asked to restrict access for others, and that does indeed reflect an attempt at censorship.” Banned Books Weeks highlights that the bulk of these books are challenged by parents for being age-inappropriate for children rather than banned outright. The American Christian right organization, Focus on the Family regularly challenges Banned Books Week, claiming that books are not really banned, and that libraries’ policies are anti-family as does The anti-gay group Parents and Friends of Ex-Gays and Gays.