Running Down a Dream (Tom Petty)

American musician, singer and songwriter Thomas Earl “Tom” Petty was born October 20, 1950 in Gainesville, Florida. He attended Gainesville High School. His interest in rock and roll music began at age ten when he met Elvis Presley.In the summer of 1961, his uncle was working on the set of Presley’s filmFollow That Dream in nearby Ocala, Florida, and invited Petty to come down and watch the shoot. He instantly became an Elvis Presley fan, and when he returned that Saturday he was greeted by his friend Keith Harben and soon traded his Wham-O slingshot for a collection of Elvis 45s. One of his first guitar teachers was Don Felder, a fellowGainesville resident, who would later join the Eagles. As a young man, Petty worked briefly on the grounds crew for the University of Florida, but never attended as a student. Shortly after forming his musical aspirations, Petty started a band known as the Epics, later to evolve into Mudcrutch. Although the band, which featured future Heartbreakers Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench, were popular in Gainesville, their recordings went unnoticed by a mainstream audience. However, their only single, “Depot Street”, remains popular amongst fans. The original Mudcrutch included guitarist Danny Roberts who was later replaced by bassist Charlie Souza.

After Mudcrutch split up, Petty reluctantly agreed to pursue a solo career. Tench decided to form his own group. Eventually, Petty and Campbell collaborated with Tench and fellow members Ron Blair and Stan Lynch, resulting in the first lineup of the Heartbreakers. Their eponymous debut album was more successful in Britain than America. The single “Breakdown” was re-released in 1977 after the band toured in the United Kingdom in support of Nils Lofgren. Their second album, You’re Gonna Get It!, featured the singles “I Need to Know” and “Listen To Her Heart”. Their third album, Damn the Torpedoes includes their breakthrough singles “Don’t Do Me Like That”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Refugee”.In September 1979, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers performed at a Musicians United for Safe Energy concert at Madison Square Garden in New York singing“Cry To Me” which became a top-ten hit, spawning the hit single “The Waiting”.Petty’s also sang his first duet, “Insider” with Stevie Nicks. In 1985, the band participated in Live Aid, playing four songs at Philadelphia’s John F. Kennedy Stadium. The album Southern Accents was also released in 1985which included the hit single “Don’t Come Around Here No More”, The ensuing tour led to the live album Pack Up the Plantation: Live! Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers joined Bob Dylan on his True Confessions Tour and also played some dates with the Grateful Dead in 1986 and 1987. Also in 1987, the group released Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) which includes “Jammin’ Me” which Petty wrote with Dylan

In 1988, Petty became a founding member of the Traveling Wilburys, along with Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison, and Jeff Lynne. The band’s first song, “Handle With Care”, was followed by the album, Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1. A second Wilburys album, entitledTraveling Wilburys Vol. 3 and recorded without the recently deceased Roy Orbison, followed in 1990. Petty has also begun to incorporate Travelling Wilburys songs into his live shows, such as “Handle With Care” and “End of the Line”. In 1989, Petty released the album Full Moon Fever, which featured hits “I Won’t Back Down”, “Free Fallin’” and “Runnin’ Down a Dream”. Mike Campbell co-produced the album with Petty and Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra, and backing musicians included Campbell, Lynne, and fellow Wilburys Roy Orbison and George Harrison (Ringo Starr appears on drums in the video for “I Won’t Back Down”.Petty & the Heartbreakers released Into the Great Wide Open in 1991, which was co-produced by Jeff Lynne and included the hit singles “Learning To Fly” and “Into The Great Wide Open”, featuring Johnny Depp, Gabrielle Anwar, Faye Dunaway, and Matt LeBlanc in the video.Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers then recorded two new songs for the Greatest Hits. “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” and Thunderclap Newman’s “Something in the Air”. Petty’s next solo album, 1994’s Wildflowers included the singles “You Don’t Know How It Feels”, “You Wreck Me,” “It’s Good to Be King” and “A Higher Place”.

In 1996, Petty, and the Heartbreakers, released a soundtrack to the movie She’s the One, starring Cameron Diaz and Jennifer Aniston. Featuring the songs “Walls (Circus)” (featuring Lindsey Buckingham), “Climb that Hill”, “Change the Locks.” and a cover of “Asshole,” by Beck and also accompanied Johnny Cash on Unchained for which Cash won aGrammy for Best Country Album). In 1994 a Tom Petty released a tribute album entitled You Got Lucky featuring Everclear and Silkworm and in April 1996, Petty received the UCLA’s George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin Award for Lifetime Musical Achievement and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers’ Golden Note Award. In 1999 Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and released another album which featured the songs , “Room at the Top” and “Free Girl Now”.Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers played “I Won’t Back Down” at the America: A Tribute to Heroes benefit concert for victims of the September 11, 2001 attacks. In 2002, he played “Taxman”, “I Need You”, and “Handle With Care” (joined by Jeff Lynne, Dhani Harrison, and Jim Keltner) at the Concert for George in honour of Petty’s friend and former bandmate George Harrison and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers were also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and also released the album The Last DJ

In 2005, Petty received the Billboard Century Award for his lifetime achievements. And in 2006, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers received the keys to the city ofGainesville, Florida, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio also featured an exhibit of Tom Petty items. In 2005, Petty began hosting his own show “Buried Treasure” on XM Radio and In February 2006, Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers headlined the fifth annual Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, followed by a Tom & the Heartbreakers’ “30th Anniversary Tour”, with Special guests including Stevie Nicks, Pearl Jam, the Allman Brothers, Trey Anastasio, Eddie Vedder, The Derek Trucks Band, and the Black Crowes. Petty also released a new solo album titled Highway Companion, which was promoted on the “30th Anniversary Tour” in 2006 with performances of the songs “Saving Grace”, “Square One”, “Down South,” and “Flirting with Time”.

In 2007, Petty joined Tom Leadon, Randall Marsh, Benmont Tench & Mike Campbell to reform Mudcrutch and released a new album in 2008 and in 2007, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers joined Willie Nelson, Lucinda Williams, Norah Jones, Lenny Kravitz and Paul McCartney to pay tribute to Fats Domino on the double-CD covers set Goin’ Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino, to raise money to rebuild parts of NewOrleans damaged by Hurricane Katrina, singing a cover of “I’m Walkin’”. In 2010 Steve Winwood ,joined Petty and the Heartbreakers on their North American tour at select shows. Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers also performed during the halftime-show of Super Bowl XLII playing”American Girl”, “I Won’t Back Down”, “Free Fallin’”, and “Runnin’ Down a Dream. In 2010 The Heartbreakers also released the Album, Mojo and also appeared as musical guests on the season finale of Saturday Night Live. .

Tom Petty also appears in many films including the 1978 film FM and 1987’s Made in Heaven and also appeared in several episodes of It’s Garry Shandling’s Show andwas also featured in Shandling’s other show, The Larry Sanders Show. He also appeared in the 1997 movie The Postman, with Kevin Costner. In 2002, he appeared on The Simpsons along with Mick Jagger, Keith Richards,Lenny Kravitz, Elvis Costello, and Brian Setzer and also has a role in the animated comedy series King of the Hill. Peter Bogdanovich has also made a documentary film on Petty’s career entitled Runnin’ Down A Dream.

Mark King (Level 42)

Mark King, the Bass Player and vocalist with English pop rock and jazz-funk band Level 42 was Born October 20th 1958. The band had a number of worldwide and UK hits during the 1980s and 1990s & gained fame for their high-calibre musicianship—in particular that of Mark King, whose percussive slap-bass guitar technique provided the driving groove of many of the band’s hits. The band are also known for the combination of King’s lead vocals and keyboard player Mike Lindup’s falsetto backing vocals. Level 42 were formed after Mark King and the Gould brothers (Phil and Rowland, A.K.A “Boon”) played together in various bands during their teenage years. Phil Gould went on to study at London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where he met keyboard player Mike Lindup in a percussion course. Both musicians found that they shared musical heroes: Miles Davis, John McLaughlin, Keith Jarrett and Jan Hammer. Boon Gould also playing bass guitar and saxophone and Lindup doubling on keyboards and drums. Mark King was primarily a drummer, but also played guitar.

The developing band (at this point, entirely an instrumental act) took the name Level 42 and settled on a working line-up of King (bass guitar, percussion), Lindup (keyboards, percussion), Boon Gould (guitar, saxophone) and Phil Gould (drums).In 1981 they released their first single, “Love Games”, which became a Top 40 hit. then cut their critically acclaimed, self-titled debut album, which was an immediate success throughout Europe. The band quickly established themselves as concert favourites, taking advantage of the high performance skills of all four members. Polydor capitalised on the band’s success by releasing a second album, The Early Tapes later in the same year. This was a compilation of material and is also known by an alternate name, Strategy. In 1982 Level 42 released their third album The Pursuit of Accidents. This was a further development of the Level 42 formula, maintaining their instrumental jazz-funk skills and styling but also experimenting further with pop songs, singles from the album were “Weave Your Spell” and “The Chinese Way”.

A fourth album, Standing in the Light, was released in 1983 It was less experimental and jazzy than previous releases & provided them with their first UK Top Ten hit The Sun Goes Down (Living It Up). The 1984 album True Colours veered stylistically between funk, power pop, mid-tempo rock and moody ballads & yielded the singles “The Chant Has Begun” and “Hot Water”. During the same year, Mark King released his first solo album Influences on which he played the majority of the instruments (with a guest appearance by Aswad’s Drummie Zeb, and with Lindup guesting on additional keyboards).The next studio album, World Machine, was released in 1985 gaining positive reviews from critics. By this time, the band had moved on from their original pure jazz-funk sound towards a much more mainstream pop/R’n’B sound, with King’s bass and Lindup and Badarou’s chugging keyboards serving as templates for smart pop songs such as “Something About You” and “Leaving Me Now”. The “Lessons in Love” single arrived in early 1986—a song that would soon appear on 1987′s Running in the Family album. The song was a massive international hit and became the band’s biggest seller.Keeping up the momentum, the band played at the Prince’s Trust concert in July 1987, with Eric Clapton standing in on lead guitar for a performance of Running in the Family. Sadly During 1987, both Phil Gould and Boon Gould left Level 42 before The next album Staring at the Sun was released.

Then During 1989, Alan Murphy contracted pneumonia, which was complicated by the fact that he was already suffering from AIDS. His decline was rapid, and he died on 19 October 1989. This was a huge shock to the band, who had not known of Murphy’s condition and who had grown so fond of him that they stated at the time that they “could not replace Alan.”Devastated, Level 42 took a year off to regroup and rethink. In 1990 they released their next album, Guaranteed which was well received by American music critics, who appreciated the group’s musicianship and regarded it as Level 42′s most musically sophisticated work to date. In early 1993, Gary Husband left Level 42 and in 1994 it was announced that Level 42 would be disbanding permanently following their concert commitments. Having been a very successful live and studio band in the 1980s, Level 42′s commercial profile diminished during the early 1990s following a series of personnel changes and musical shifts. After disbanding in 1994, the band again reformed in 2001.

Bela Lugosi (Dracula)

Best known for portraying Count Dracula in the original 1931 film, the Hungarian-American actor Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó better known as Béla Lugosi, was born 20 October 1882. He had been playing small parts on the stage in his native Hungary before making his first film in 1917, he also had roles in several films in Weimar Germany before arriving in America as a seaman on a merchant ship. Lugosi’s first film appearance was in the movie Az ezredes (The Colonel, 1917). When appearing in Hungarian silent films, he used the stage name Arisztid Olt. Lugosi made 12 films in Hungary between 1917 and 1918 before leaving for Germany in 1919, where he began appearing in a small number of well received films, including adaptations of the Karl May novels, Auf den Trümmern des Paradieses (On the Brink of Paradise), and Die Todeskarawane The Caravan of Death), opposite the Jewish actress Dora Gerson (who was murdered at Auschwitz).Lugosi left Germany in October 1920, intending to emigrate to the United States, and entered the country at New Orleans in December 1920. He made his way to New York and was legally inspected for immigration at Ellis Island in March 1921, becoming a U.S. citizen in 1931.

upon his arrival in America, the 6-foot-1-inch (1.85 m), 180 pounds (82 kg) Lugosi worked for some time as a laborer, then entered the theater in New York City’s Hungarian immigrant colony. With fellow Hungarian actors he formed a small stock company that toured Eastern cities, playing for immigrant audiences. He acted in his first Broadway play, The Red Poppy, in 1922. Three more parts came in 1925–1926, including a five-month run in the comedy-fantasy The Devil in the Cheese. In 1925, he appeared as an Arab Sheik inArabesque which premiered in Buffalo, New York at the Teck Theatre before moving to Broadway.His first American film role came in the 1923 melodrama The Silent Command. Several more silent roles followed, as villains or continental types, all in productions made in the New York area.Lugosi was approached in the summer of 1927to star in a Broadway production of Dracula adapted by Hamilton Deaneand John L. Balderston from Bram Stoker’s novelthis ran for 261 performances before touring. He was soon called to Hollywood for character parts in early talkies.

In 1927, he appeared as Count Dracula in a Broadway adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel, where he was talent-spotted as a character actor for the new Hollywood talkies. He would appear in the classic 1931 Dracula talkie by Universal Pictures.Through the 1930s, he occupied an important niche in popular horror films, with their East European setting, but his Hungarian accent limited his repertoire, and he tried unsuccessfully to avoid typecasting. he was often paired with Boris Karloff, Among his pairings with Karloff, wereThe Black Cat (1934), The Raven (1935), and Son of Frankenstein (1939) .By this time, Lugosi had been receiving regular medication for sciatic neuritis, and he had become addicted to morphine and methadone. This drug dependence was noted by producers, and the offers eventually dwindled down to a few parts in Ed Wood’s low-budget movies

Despite his critically acclaimed performance on stage, Lugosi was not first choice for the role of Dracula and that Lugosi was chosen only due to Chaney’s death shortly before production. In 1927, Lugosi accepted the titular role in the American theatrical run of Dracula, a play based on Bram Stoker’s gothic novel of the same name.Lugosi’s Dracula was unlike any previous portrayals of the role. Handsome, mysterious and alluring, Lugosi’s Dracula was at once so sexy and so haunting that audiences gasped when he first opened his mouth to speak. After a half-year run on Broadway, Dracula toured the United States to much fanfare and critical acclaim throughout 1928 and 1929.The Dracula of Lugosi did not look like the previous representations. His portrayal of Dracula was so successful that Universal decided to make a movie of Dracula starring Lugosi. The film, The Strangest Passion The World Has Ever Known, forever immortalized the portrayal of Lugosi’s Dracula.

During the mid 30’s Lugosi found himself consigned to Universal’s non-horror B-film unit, in small roles. Throughout the 1930s, Lugosi, experiencing a severe career decline despite popularity with audiences (Universal executives always preferred his rival Karloff), accepted many leading roles from independent producers like Nat Levine, Sol Lesser, and Sam Katzman. These low-budget thrillers indicate that Lugosi was less discriminating than Karloff in selecting screen vehicles, but the exposure helped Lugosi financially if not artistically. Lugosi tried to keep busy with stage work, but had to borrow money from the Actors’ Fund to pay hospital bills when his only child, Bela George Lugosi, was born in 1938. His career was boosted by Universal’s Son of Frankenstein (1939), when he played the character role of Ygor, who uses the Monster for his own revenge, in heavy makeup and beard. The same year saw Lugosi playing a stern commissar in MGM’s comedy Ninotchka, starring Greta Garbo. Five years later he was appearing in horror, comedy and mystery B-films. At Universal, he often received star billing for what amounted to a supporting part. The Gorilla (1939) had him playing straight man to Patsy Kelly.

Due to injuries received during military service, Lugosi developed severe, chronic sciatica. Though at first he was treated with pain remedies such as asparagus juice, doctors increased the medication to opiates. The growth of his dependence on pain-killers, particularly morphine and methadone, was directly proportional to the dwindling of screen offers. He was finally cast in the role of Frankenstein’s monster for Universal’s Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943). He also portrayed Dracula a second and last time on film in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948). By this time, Lugosi’s drug use was so notorious that the producers were not even aware that Lugosi was still alive, and had penciled in actor Ian Keith for the role. Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein was Bela Lugosi’s last “A” movie. For the remainder of his life he appeared — less and less frequently — in obscure, low-budget features.

From 1947 to 1950, he performed on stage in Dracula or arsenic and Old Lace, and made personal appearances in a touring “spook show” and on television. While inEngland to play a six-month tour of Dracula in 1951, he co-starred in a lowbrow movie comedy, Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (also known as Vampire over London and My Son, the Vampire). After returning to America, Lugosi was interviewed for television, and revealed his ambition to play more comedy, though wistfully noting, “Now I am the boogie man.” Independent producer Jack Broder took Lugosi at his word, casting him in a jungle-themed comedy, Bela Lugosi Meets a Brooklyn Gorilla starring Jerry Lewis lookalike Sammy Petrillo. Another opportunity for comedy came in September 1949 when Milton Berle invited Lugosi to appear in a sketch on Texaco Star Theater.[14] Lugosi memorized the script for the skit, but became confused on the air when Berle began to ad lib.His only television dramatic role was on the anthology seriesSuspense on October 11, 1949 in the episode The Cask of Amontillado

Late in his life, Bela Lugosi again received star billing in movies when filmmaker Ed Wood, a fan of Lugosi, found him living in obscurity and near-poverty and offered him roles in his films, such as an anonymous narrator in Glen or Glenda and a Dr. Frankenstein-like mad scientist in Bride of the Monster. During post-production of the latter, Lugosi decided to seek treatment for his drug addiction, and the premiere of the film was said to be intended to help pay for his hospital expenses. a new Ed Wood film, The Ghoul Goes West. was one of several projects proposed by Wood, including The Phantom Ghoul and Dr. Acula. With Lugosi in his famed Dracula cape, Wood shot impromptu test footage, with no storyline in mind, in front of Tor Johnson’s home, a suburban graveyard and in front of Lugosi’s apartment building on Carlton Way. This footage ended up in Plan 9 from Outer Space, which was mostly filmed after Lugosi’s death. Wood hired Tom Mason, his wife’s chiropractor, to double for Lugosi in additional shots. Mason was noticeably taller and thinner than Lugosi, and had the lower half of his face covered with his cape in every shot, as Lugosi sometimes did in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. Lugosi made one final film, in late 1955, The Black Sleep, for Bel-Air Pictures, which was released in the summer of 1956 through United Artists with a promotional campaign that included several personal appearances. To his disappointment, however, his role in this film was of a mute, with no dialogue.

Lugosi was 73 when he died of a heart attack on August 16, 1956, in his Los Angeles home. He married five times, and had one son, Bela George Lugosi. He was buried wearing one of the Dracula Cape costumes, per the request of his son and fifth wife, in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California. In Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, Lugosi is played by Martin Landau, who received the 1994 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Three Lugosi projects were featured on the television show Mystery Science Theater 3000.The Corpse Vanishes, the Phantom Creeps and Bride of the Monster. An episode ofSledge Hammer titled “Last of the Red Hot Vampires” was a homage to Bela Lugosi. A statue of Lugosi can be seen today on one of the corners of the Vajdahunyad Castlein Budapest. The cape Lugosi wore in Dracula is at Universal Studios. The theatrical play Lugosi – a vámpír árnyéka (Lugosi – the Shadow of the Vampire)is based on Lugosi’s life, telling the story of his life and He was played by, Ivan Darvas. Lugosi he is also mentioned in “Bela Lugosi’s Dead”, by Bauhaus, and was a charter member of the American Screen Actors Guild.

Kate Mosse OBE

Best selling Novellist Kate Mosse OBE was born 20 October 1961 in Chichester and was educated at Chichester High School For Girls and New College, Oxford. She graduated from university in 1981 with a BA (Hons) in English. After graduation, she spent seven years in publishing in London, working for Hodder & Stoughton, then Century, and finally as an editorial director at Hutchinson, part of the Random House Group. She was a member of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) and Women in Publishing. She left publishing in 1992, to begin her writing career and to help setting up a new literary prize, and published two works of non-fiction and two novels. Mosse married old school friend Greg, after meeting him again ten years later on a train by chance and currently lives with him and her family in Chichester and Carcassonne after having bought a small house in Carcassonne in the Languedoc region of southwest France, the inspiration for her bestselling trilogy of historical timeslip novels Labyrinth, Sepulchre and Citadel. She moved back to her home town of Chichester in 1998 to take the position of executive director of Chichester Festival Theatre

In 2001, she began writing the first of the series, Labyrinth, which was published in 2005. Her bestselling books have sold millions of copies in more than 40 countries. Although best known for her adventure and ghost fiction, inspired by real history, Mosse’s first two works were non-fiction. Becoming A Mother (in its seventh edition) was published by Virago in 1993, followed in 1995 by The House: Behind the Scenes at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, published by BBC Books to accompany the award-winning BBC 2 fly-on-the-wall documentary series of the same name. She then turned her hand to fiction, publishing two contemporary novels. Eskimo Kissing, about a young, adopted woman searching for her background, was published to critical acclaim in 1996. This was followed in 1998 by the biotech thriller, Crucifix Lane. Part of Labyrinth is set in Medieval Carcasonne during 1209 on the night before a brutal civil crusade to rid the land of Cathars and concerns a young woman named Alais (Jessica Brown Findlay) who works as a healer and herbalist and finds a dead man in the river with his thumb cut off. Anais then finds herself custodian of the mysterious Book of Words, Although she cannot understand the symbols and diagrams the book contains, Alais finds out that the book could reveal the location of The Holy Grail itself and knows her destiny lies in protecting their secret, at all costs, Meanwhile back in modern day Languedoc an amatuer Archeologist named Alice Tanner (Vanessa Kirby) discovers two skeletons during an archaeological dig in a mysterious cave which has strange symbols drawn on the walls and contains a Ring. She begins to suspect that that she has unearthed a link with a horrific and brutal past. But it’s not just the sight of the shattered bones that makes her uneasy; there’s an overwhelming sense of evil in the tomb that Alice finds hard to shake off. Puzzled by the words carved inside the chamber, Alice has an uneasy feeling that she has disturbed something which was meant to remain hidden and finds herself drawn into a conspiricy involving an age old mystery concerning The location of the Book of Words and the Holy Grail. Television rights were sold to Scott Free and Tandem Communications and the Labyrinth miniseries was broadcast in 2013. The cast included John Hurt, Janet Suzman, Jessica Brown Findlay, Tom Felton, and Sebastian Stan.

In October 2007, the second novel in the trilogy, Sepulchre, was published. A tale of haunting and Tarot set in 18th Century Paris and Languedoc and 20th-century France, it was also a number one bestseller in the UK and an international bestseller which starts In 1891 and features, Leone Vernier, a young girl living in Paris until she is invited to live at Domaine de la Cade, a stately home in Rennes-les-Bains, which is owned by Léonie’s deceased uncle Jules and his wife Isolde. Meanwhile In the present day, an American, Meredith Martin, is in France to research the life of Claude Debussy for a biography she is writing. She is also trying to find out more about her biological mother and she visits Domaine de la Cade, which has been turned into a hotel and uncovers information that links her lineage to that of Léonie Vernier and discovers the terrifying events that occurred in the haunted abandoned Sepulchre which is situated in the grounds of Domaine de la Cade. the stories of Léonie and Meredith are brought together by a series of visions that are related to the Sepulchre, in the grounds of the Domaine de la Cade

Citadel, the third novel in the trilogy, came out in 2013 and was also an international bestseller. Inspired by the real history of the resistance in Carcassonne during World War II, Set in and around Carcassonne and the Languedoc region of France, it features an imagined all-female resistance unit. it explores the incredible history, legends and hidden secrets of the area. Set during World War II in the far south of France, the novel is described as a powerful, action-packed mystery that reveals the secrets of the resistance under Nazi occupation. While war blazed in the trenches at the front, back at home a different battle is waged, full of clandestine bravery, treachery and secrets. And as a cell of resistance fighters, codenamed Citadelle, fight for everything they hold dear, their struggle will reveal an older, darker combat being fought in the shadows. Combining the rugged action of LABYRINTH with the haunting mystery of SEPULCHRE, CITADEL is a story of daring and courage, of lives risked for beliefs and of astonishing secrets buried in time. While Mosse was researching Citadel, she released The Winter Ghosts in 2009, based on a novella she previously contributed to the Quick Reads Initiative. Film rights have been sold to Ruby Films and in October 2013, Mosse’s collection of short stories, The Mistletoe Bride & Other Haunting Tales, was published – a collection of ghost stories inspired by traditional folk tales and country legends from England and France, throughout Sussex, Brittany and the Languedoc. There has also been a lavish two-part 2013 TV adaptation based on Kate Mosse’s novel Labyrinth which was made by Ridley Scott’s production company, Scott Free.

World Osteoporosis Day

World Osteoporosis Day is observed annually on 20 October. It was launched on 20 October 1996 by the United Kingdom’s National Osteoporosis Society and supported by the European Commission. Since 1997, the day has been organised by the International Osteoporosis Foundation and involves campaigns by national osteoporosis patient societies from around the world with activities in over 90 countries. In 1998 and 1999, the World Health Organization acted as co-sponsor of World Osteoporosis Day. The day also marks the launch of a year-long campaign to raise awareness of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. Since 1999 these campaigns have featured a specific theme.

Osteoporosis (“porous bones”, from Greek: οστούν/ostoun meaning “bone” and πόρος/poros meaning “pore”) is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and density which can lead to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis, the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, bone microarchitecture deteriorates, and the amount and variety of proteins in bone are altered. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a bone mineral density of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the mean peak bone mass (average of young, healthy adults) as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; the term “established osteoporosis” includes the presence of a fragility fracture. The disease may be classified as primary type 1, primary type 2, or secondary.

The form of osteoporosis most common in women after menopause is referred to as primary type 1 or postmenopausal osteoporosis. Primary type 2 osteoporosis or senile osteoporosis occurs after age 75 and is seen in both females and males at a ratio of 2:1. Secondary osteoporosis may arise at any age and affect men and women equally. This form results from chronic predisposing medical problems or disease, or prolonged use of medications such as glucocorticoids, when the disease is called steroid- or glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The risk of osteoporosis fractures can be reduced with lifestyle changes and in those with previous osteoporosis related fractures, medications. Lifestyle change includes diet, exercise, and preventing falls. The utility of calcium and vitamin D is questionable in most. Bisphosphonates are useful in those with previous fractures from osteoporosis but are of minimal benefit in those who have osteoporosis but no previous fractures. Osteoporosis is a component of the frailty syndrome.