Phil Lynott (Thin Lizzy, Skid Row)

Irish musician, singer and songwriter Phil Lynott sadly died 4 January 1986. Lynott was born 20 August 1949 in Hallam Hospital (now Sandwell General Hospital) in West Bromwich, England, and christened at St. Edwards Church in Selly Park, Birmingham. His parents were Philomena Lynott and Cecil Parris. When he was four years old, Philip went to live with his grandmother, Sarah Lynott, in Crumlin, Dublin. His mother stayed in Manchester, and later took over the management of the Clifton Grange Hotel in Whalley Range with her partner, Dennis Keeley. The hotel, nicknamed “The Biz”, became popular with showbusiness entertainers, and was later referred to in a song on Thin Lizzy’s debut album.

Lynott had a happy childhood growing up in Dublin, and was a popular character at school and fronted several bands as a lead vocalist, most notably Skid Row alongside Gary Moore, before learning the bass guitar and forming Thin Lizzy in 1969. After initial success with “Whiskey in the Jar”, the band found strong commercial success in the mid-1970s with hits such as “The Boys Are Back in Town”, “Jailbreak” and “Waiting for an Alibi”, Which used a combination of Lynott’s vocal and songwriting skills and the use of dual lead guitars.

Towards the end of the 1970s, Lynott also embarked upon a solo career, published two books of poetry, and after Thin Lizzy disbanded, he assembled and fronted the band Grand Slam until 1985. He subsequently had major UK success with Moore with the song “Out in the Fields”, followed by the minor hit “Nineteen”, before his death on 4 January 1986. He remains a popular figure in the rock world, and in 2005, a statue to his memory was erected in Dublin.

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