LNER 4468 A4 pacific class “Mallard”

LNER 4468 Mallard

LNER 4468 Mallard

LNER 4468 4-6-2 Paciflc class locomotive Mallard was built at Doncaster, England 3 March 1938. While in other respects a relatively typical member of its class, it is historically significant for being the holder of the official world speed record for steam locomotives. Mallard was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley as an express locomotive to power high-speed streamlined trains. Its wind-tunnel-tested, aerodynamic body and high power allowed it to reach speeds of over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), though in everyday service it was relatively uncommon for any steam hauled service to reach even 90mph, much less 100. 1948 Locomotive Exchange Trials In 1948, shortly after the formation of British Railways, the decision was taken to test locomotives from all of the former ‘Big Four’ companies to find the best attributes of speed, power and efficiency with coal and water. There were two ways of testing and comparing locomotives: either at the Rugby Locomotive testing plant, which was not ready until late 1948 or by testing in the field itself. The results of these trials would be used to help design the British Railways Standard design of locomotives. The express passenger locomotive designs which would be compared were: London Midland Region (former LMS) Princess Coronation class, Eastern Region (former LNER) Class A4, Southern Region (former Southern) Merchant Navy class and Western Region (former GWR) 6000 Class or King class. Three Gresley A4 locomotives were chosen to represent the Eastern Region: E22 Mallard, 60033 Seagull and 60034 Lord Faringdon.

All of the locomotives had the Kylchap double blastpipe chimney arrangement and were fresh from Doncaster works. Mallard had emerged from Doncaster with a fresh coat of post-war garter blue livery, stainless steel numbers 22 with a small ‘E’ painted above them (for Eastern region), new boiler (her fourth) and third tender of her career. E22 Mallard was used on 8 June 1948 on the Waterloo-Exeter route. Driver Marrable took the famous A4 with a load of 481 tons tare, 505 tons full, the same that had been used on the previous trip by 35018 British India Line. Mallard got through Clapham Junction in 6 minutes 57 seconds, Woking in 28 minutes 47 seconds. At Hook there were adverse signals, causing Mallard to slow to a crawl. Even so, Salisbury was reached in 108 minutes and 28 seconds. Despite the signals earlier, the train was only 5-and-a-half minutes late. The net time was 95.5 minutes. Mallard failed after this trial and 60033 Seagull took over. 10 June saw Seagull achieve the run in 96 minutes 22 seconds, but had departed 3 minutes late, meaning Seagull had arrived with the same load 3.5 minutes early. For Mallard, the 1948 Locomotive Exchange Trials were over, but Mallard was to return to the Waterloo-Exeter line for a Locomotive Club of Great Britain (LCGB) railtour in 24 February 1963 after wch it was retired, having covered almost one and a half million miles (2.4 million km).

It was restored to working order in the 1980s, and ran some specials between York and Scarborough in July 1986 and made a couple of runs between York and Harrogate/Leeds around Easter 1987. Mallard is now part of the National Collection at the United Kingdom’s National Railway Museum in York. On the weekend of 5 July 2008, Mallard was taken outside for the first time in years and displayed alongside her A4 sisters, thus reuniting all four A4s extant in the UK for the first time since preservation. She departed the museum for Locomotion, the NRM’s outbase at Shildon on the 23 June 2010, where she was a static exhibit, until she was hauled back to York on 19 July 2011 and put back on display in its original location in the Great Hall. Then In 2014 Mallard was reunited with The five other remaining A4 Pacifics (60019/LNER 4464 Bittern, 60007 Sir Nigel Gresley, 60009 Union of South Africa, Dwight D.Eisenhower and Dominion of Canada for the Great Gathering in the Great Hall at the National Railway Museum.

World Book Day 2016

imageThis years World Book Day (UK) takes place 3 March 2016. The event has been running across the UK and Ireland since 1995 and is sponspored by UNESCO to promote reading, publishing and copyright. It is the local manifestation of World Book and Copyright Day (also known as International Day of the Book or World Book Days). On World Book Day, every child in full-time education in the UK is given a voucher to be spent on books. The Day was first celebrated in 1995 in the United Kingdom. The original, global World Book Day event is generally observed on 23 April However In the United Kingdom, World Book Day is held annually on the first Thursday in March instead, to avoid the established international 23 April date which clashes with Easter school holidays, and St George’s Day

The United Kingdom’s own version of World Book Day was launched at the Globe Theatre in London, when Several million schoolchildren in Great Britain were given a GB£1 special World Book Day Book Token (€1.50 in Ireland) which could be redeemed against any book in any UK bookshop. A specially created WBD anthology priced at £1 (€1.50 in Ireland) was also published. All World Book Day point of sale and the £1 book carried the special World Book Day logo to help unify the initiative through all outlets.Since then, World Book Day UK has followed a similar pattern, gradually growing each year to encompass more initiatives, such as Spread The Word, Quick Reads Initiative and Books for Hospitals. Every year, the number of children receiving a World Book Day Book Token has increased. In 2000, instead of a single £1 special anthology, four separate £1 books were published, covering a wider age-range. Since then, each year has seen a new set of special £1 books published.

In 2006, World Book Day began its support of and association with the Quick Reads initiative for adult emergent readers.In 2007, World Book Day celebrated its 10th anniversary with the publication of 10 £1 books. Since then every child in full-time education in the UK and Ireland is entitled to receive a £1 World Book day Book token every year. They can swap their WBD token for one of specially-produced £1 WBD books or they can get £1 off a full-price book or audio book. In 2007, the Spread the Word promotion was revamped into an on-line book group featuring a number of adult books suitable for book Groups. A short list of 10 titles was announced on 1 February 2008, and the winning book, was Boy A by Jonathan Trigell. World Book Day 2008 was declared by The Bookseller magazine to be more successful than any previous World Book Day. World Book Day has been billed as The Biggest Book Show on Earth and is celebrated with a variety of events in schools and libraries, including a festival hosted by Tony Robinson, presenter and author of the Weird World of Wonders series, who gave advice on how to start writing.

Past speakers have included Anthony Horowitz, author of the popular Alex Rider series, who discussed how to create suspense and plant clues,(House of Silk and Trigger Mortis are great) Horrid Henry writer Francesca Simon demonstrated how to bring characters to life, Lauren Child, creator of Charlie and Lola and Clarice Bean series, hosted a talk on how to develop characters while Cathy Cassidy, two time winner of the prestigious ‘Queen of Teen Awards’, explained how to structure a story. For budding illustrators there was also advice from Shirley Hughes OBE on where to start plus tips on drawing animal characters from Guy Parker-Rees, whose Giraffes Can’t Dance and Spookyrumpus have made him one of the bestselling illustrators in the country. There was also a free book making workshop for kids at the National Print Museum, Dublin and a meet-the-authors event with Annabel Pitcher (author of My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece) and Michael Stewart (King Crow) at Wakefield Library and Museum. Here are the books being offered in this years promotion.

 

  • kipper’s visitor
  • Supertato
  • Daisy and the trouble with Jack by Kes Grey
  • The Great Mouse plot by Roald Dahl
  • TheWorldof Norm by Jonathan Meres
  • Star Wars Adventures in Wild Space by Cavan Scott
  • Harper and the Sea of Secrets by Cerrie Burnell
  • The boy who could do what he liked by David Baddiel
  • Spot the Difference by Juno Dawson
  • Kindred Spirits by Rainbow Powell