Happy Hour

Musician, vocalist and songwriter for the Housemartins and Beautiful South, Dave Hemingway was born 20 September 1960, Hull, Yorkshire, England) . He attended Hull’s Henry Cooper School, where he met The Housemartins’ future drummer, Hugh Whitaker. The two shared an interest in drumming, and Hemingway followed Whitaker into bands, first the Newpolitans with Dave Rotheray on bass, and then the Velvetones. Whilst at university in London Dave was drummer and a founding member of The Shoppers. It became a well regarded post-punk band (Steve Brain guitar/ lead vocals Maxine Tarte keyboards/ vocals Gavin Hearne lead guitar/vocals Christos Yanni bass/ vocals).

His break came when he got a call from Rotheray telling him Whitaker had left The Housemartins. Rotheray recommended him to Housemartins guitarist Stan Cullimore, who phoned him. He was working as a purchase ledger clerk at the time for the Crystal Motor Group. Hemingway quit his job on 6 March 1987, and soon found himself in the studio, recording the band’s second album, The People Who Grinned Themselves to Death.

After the Housemartins disbanded, he and Housemartins founder Paul Heaton put together The Beautiful South from its ashes, featuring roadie and bassist Sean Welch. Hemingway’s first solo album, Hello Cruel World, was released as a download only on iTunes. The album’s title was inspired by Hemingway’s experience recording in the capital. After forming “The South” in 2008, Hemingway along with Alison Wheeler from the original Beautiful South line-up, released their first album since 2006 entitled Sweet Refrains.

Nuno Bettencourt (Extreme)

Portuguese-born American guitarist, singer-songwriter, and record producer Nuno Duarte Gil Mendes Bettencourt was born September 20, 1966 in Praia da Vitória, Terceira, Azores, Portugal. When he was four years old, his family, including brothers Luís and Roberto, moved to Hudson, Massachusetts. Bettencourt lived on Main Street in Hudson for twenty-one years. Initially, Bettencourt had little interest in music, preferring to spend his time playing hockey and soccer. His first instrument was the drums and he played them exclusively until his brother, Luís, started teaching him the guitar.

While Bettencourt was slow to adopt the instrument under his brother’s tutelage, his skills quickly developed when he began teaching himself, In his sophomore and junior years of high school, Bettencourt dropped out of sports and High School to focus on playing guitar.  Bettencourt’s musical influences include Eddie Van Halen.  The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Prince, Queen, Pat Travers, Paco de Lucía, Al Di Meola and Kayak. Bettencourt rose to international prominence as a guitar player after he joined Extreme in 1985. the band released its debut record, Extreme, in 1989. He then provided rhythm guitar on the single version of Janet Jackson’s “Black Cat,”

In 1990, Extreme released their most critically acclaimed album, Pornograffitti, which included the hits “More Than Words” and “Hole Hearted”. The album also has one of the most impressive guitar solos to date, The “Flight of the Wounded Bumblebee” an interpretation of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee”, which is the intro guitar solo to the Track “He-Man Woman Hater”. The band followed up with III Sides to Every Story in 1992. Bettencourt composed and arranged the brass and string sections for this album and the full orchestra on the album. In 1995, Extreme released the album, Waiting for the Punchline, but the band broke up in 1996 when Bettencourt expressed his desire to follow a solo career. Shortly after, singer Gary Cherone went on to become the lead singer of Van Halen.

In 2007, the band reformed with the original line up (with the exception of Paul Geary) to begin work on a new album, Saudades de Rock, released on August 12, 2008, and subsequent tour. In 1997, Bettencourt released his first solo effort, Schizophonic, which he had been working on for five years. The album was well-received critically, but was not a commercial success. On December 16, 1997, Bettencourt’s new band – Mourning Widows (whose name was inspired by a writing he had seen on a church wall back in Portugal), released their self-titled debut album in Japan on Polydor Records. It sold 45,000 in the first month. The band featured Roberto Carlos’ son Donovan Bettencourt on bass and New York drummer Jeff Consi. In 2000, Mourning Widow’s follow-up, Furnished Souls for Rent originally released in Japan, and then in the U.S.

2008, Bettencourt was featured on the soundtrack for the motion picture Smart People. Bettencourt is credited on the cover on the soundtrack as well. The soundtrack also features the Gary Cherone track, “Need I Say More”, and Baby Animals selections. The album was released by Hollywood Records and is available on iTunes. The following year, Bettencourt was featured in a song and video called “Best Night Ever”. by Marshall Eriksen, a character on How I Met Your Mother The video was a parody of Extreme’s “More Than Words” video, featuring the entire main cast of How I Met Your Mother.

Bettencourt formed Population 1 and released Population 1, (which featured him playing all instruments on most tracks), Bettencourt assembled a band with Joe Pessia on bass, Steve Ferlazzo on keyboards and back-up vocals, and Kevin Figueiredo on drums and back-up vocals. Steve Ferlazzo was also featured in Cherone’s next band carnation effort after Van Halen’s breakup (Along with Pat Badger and Mike Mangini from Extreme) Tribe of Judah.In 2004, Population 1 released Sessions from Room Four in 2005 and the band was renamed to Near Death Experience, then again, renamed to DramaGods. DramaGods released their first album in December 2005. DramaGods are currently seeking a record deal for release of their first album under the new name in the U.S. After an explosive debut on the increasingly popular The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, the band (still called ‘Population 1′ at that point), later appeared on the social networking website MySpace, featuring videos and songs from the aforementioned Dramagods album, entitled Love. Bettencourt decided to make the album available through iTunes before procuring an American record deal. Bettencourt frequently toured with DramaGods in Japan where they appeared at the Udo Music Festival along with KISS, Santana, Jeff Beck, The Doobie Brothers, Alice in Chains, The Pretenders, Ben Folds Five, and others in July 2006 shortly after Bettencourt took part in a three date reunion tour with Extreme in New England.

Bettencourt’s playing has been featured at 2004 on the Universal/Japan CD and DVD release of Guitar Wars featuring solo and collective performances of Bettencourt with many others, including Steve Hackett (Genesis, GTR), Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones and Mr. Big/Racer X guitarist Paul Gilbert. The Satellite Party is Jane’s Addiction frontman Perry Farrell’s new project which featured Bettencourt as lead guitarist (Nuno left the band in July 2007, citing disagreements about the direction of the live show), along with DramaGods drummer Kevin Figueiredo, bassist Carl Restivo (who also played with Extreme in the Azores in 2004), and Etty Farrell on backing vocals. An earlier lineup of the band with Perry Farrell, Etty Farrell, Nuno, Kevin Figueiredo, and Steve Ferlazo (Dramagods) on keyboards performed at the 2005 Lollapalooza festival. In 2007 Bettencourt helped produce Ultra Payloaded, the debut album by Satellite Party Who performed alongside Pearl Jam, Kings of Leon and Incubus in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. In late July 2007. The latest CD from magician Criss Angel contains a song on which Bettencourt appears and was released in June 2006. Sully Erna, Vince Neil, Shannon Larkin and Bettencourt join Angel in the video for the track “MF 2”. In 1990, Bettencourt played rhythm guitar on the single version of Janet Jackson’s “Black Cat”.In 1993, Bettencourt co-wrote and produced “Where Are You Going” for the Super Mario Bros. movie. He also joined Robert Palmer in the studio to record Palmer’s album Honey. Bettencourt co-wrote Tantric’s hit single “Hey Now”), Hollywood recording group BB Mak, Toni Braxton, and numerous others.Bettencourt has also collaborated with singer Suze DeMarchi and with all of her Baby Animals bandmates. On Baby Animals’ second release, Shaved and Dangerous. He also co-wrote “Because I Can”. Baby Animals also appeared on Bettencourt’s 1997 solo album Schizophonic. In 1991, Bettencourt produced Dweezil Zappa’s album Confessions.

Bettencourt also sings lead vocals for the first time on a semi-ballad entitled “The Kiss”, and plays guitar and sings background vocal on other tracks alongside Extreme members Gary Cherone and Pat Badger. In 1999, Bettencourt produced and contributed vocals for Portuguese singer and actress Lúcia Moniz’ album Magnolia. In 2006, Bettencourt along with his band DramaGods contributed their song “S’OK” to the album project Artists for Charity – Guitarists 4 the Kids, for World Vision Canada, an organisation which helps underprivileged kids in need.In November 2009, Bettencourt toured with Rihanna on her Last Girl on Earth Tour as lead guitarist and has since performed on her Loud (2010), 777 (2012) and Diamonds World (2013) tours, respectively. In July 2011, Steel Panther and Nuno collaborated on the track “It Won’t Suck Itself”, which also featured Nickelback frontman Chad Kroeger and during 2016 Bettencourt was also one of five guitarists featured on the Generation Axe tour.

Jarvis Cocker (Pulp)

Jarvis Cocker, English singer-songwriter, musiian, and actor (Pulp and Relaxed Muscle) was born 19 September 1963 in Sheffield, growing up in the Intake area of the city. His father, Mac, a DJ and actor, moved to Sydney when Jarvis was seven and had no contact with him or his sister Saskia. Jarvis Cocker credits his upbringing, almost exclusively in female company, for his interest in how women think and what they have to say. He wrote a song (“A Little Soul” on This Is Hardcore) about being abandoned by his father, and in 1998 travelled with his sister to Australia to meet him for the first time in nearly 30 years. Mac Cocker had a successful radio DJ career in Sydney beginning withDouble J in the 1970s and then Triple J in the 1980s, and did not counter a common impression there that he was Joe Cocker’s brother or cousin (despite both being from Sheffield, they are not related in any way).

Cocker founded “Arabacus Pulp” (named after a tradeable commodity he saw in an economics class) at the age of 15 while he was still at The City School. After numerous line-up changes, and a shortening of the name to “Pulp”, they eventually found fame in the 1990s with the success of the albums His ‘n’ Hers (1994) and Different Class (1995). As Pulp’s front-man, part of his trademark image was his glasses, which seemed to “stay magically on his face” no matter his antics on stage. Pulp released two more albums (This Is Hardcore and We Love Life). After releasing a greatest hits album, the band was on hiatus from 2003 to 2010, but returned to activity in 2011. Cocker is also renowned for his wit and observations of the cultural scene. He was a frequent guest on TV shows in the 1990s, and hosted the Channel 4 channel 4 Program “Journeys into the Outside” meeting so-called “outsider artists”. Cocker’s penchant for TV appearances was reflected in a parody of “Common People” (“Showbiz People”) which was featured on the satirical comedy show Spitting Image in 1996.

Following Pulp’s hiatus, Cocker has led a successful solo career, and currently presents his own radio show on BBC Radio 6 Music, Jarvis Cocker’s Sunday Service. He has also had a successful solo career and at the 2006 Reading festival, the video for “Running the World” was played on the main video screens of the main stage throughout the day, notably before the headline act, Muse, performed. This video contained a karaoke-like presentation of the song’s lyrics to encourage the crowd to sing along.Cocker is now following a solo career – his debut album, Jarvis, came out in the UK on 13 November 2006. In March 2007, he appeared on French band Air’s album Pocket Symphony.On 14 February 2007, he was chosen to give the award for Best British Newcomer (awarded to the Fratellis) at the Brit Awards.He curated the 2007 Meltdown Festival at the South Bank Centre in London. The acts he chose include Motörhead, Roky Erickson and the Explosives with Clinic, Devo with Drumsize, Iggy & The Stooges, Cornershop and The Jesus and Mary Chain.In March 2008, Cocker made a small tour of Latin America (México, Argentina and Chile) where he presented a new song called “Girls Like It Too”..”Cocker debuted another new song, “Angela”, on BBC2’s “The Summer Exhibition: A Culture Show Special”, on 13 June 2008.

In 2009 Cocker’s released a solo album Further Complications, In Which, Cocker embraced an altogether more muscular sound, while retaining his trademark witticisms (on ‘Leftovers’, he sings “I met her in the Museum of Palaeontology / “And I make no bones about it”). Cocker also participated in a project raising the question, “What is Music?” Which was designed to enter into the debate over the future of the music industry. “Does this mean,” asked the singer, “that music can now go back to being an art form again? Also, what happens if you get a band to rehearse in an art gallery instead of a rehearsal space?” Consequently, Cocker and his band installed themselves in an art gallery in Paris for five days. Each day, Cocker and his musicians performed a variety of different tasks. These included soundtracking a relaxation class, inviting local musicians to join them in a jam, and arranging activities with local school-children. The events were organised around Jarvis’s public rehearsals for his forthcoming live dates. In June 2011, Cocker was chosen as poetry guest editor for The Mays Anthology, a collection of new writing from students at the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge.

Cocker has also collaborated with many other artists and sang a duet, “Ciao!”, with Miki Berenyi on British shoegazing band Lush’s 1996 album Lovelife. In 1997, he collaborated withDavid Arnold on a cover of All Time High by Rita Coolidge, the theme from Octopussy. Furthermore, he gained co-writing credits for several songs (“Walk Like A Panther”, “1st Man in Space”, “Drive Safely Darlin’”, “Stars On Sunday”, and “Happy Birthday Nicola”) on TheAll Seeing I’s album Pickled Eggs & Sherbet, released in 1999. He contributed lead vocals to “Drive Safely Darlin’”. He also performed live with The All Seeing I on Top Of The Pops, singing “Walk Like A Panther” in place of Tony Christie, who sang on the recorded version.In 2001 he contributed “Everybody Loves The Underdog” to the soundtrack for Mike Bassett: England Manager. He re-emerged in 2003 to promote a new album, under the pseudonym “Darren Spooner”, for his new band Relaxed Muscle. The same year, he appeared on theRichard X album Richard X Presents His X-Factor Vol. 1. In 2004, Cocker collaborated with Nancy Sinatra on her new album, as well as with Marianne Faithfull on her album Kissin’ Time, with the song “Sliding through Life on Charm.”In 2005 Cocker co-wrote three tracks (“La Degustation”, “Basque Country” and “Fred de Fred”) on Sheffield-based electronica duo The Lovers’ self-titled debut album. That same year he also covered “I Can’t Forget” by Leonard Cohen as part of the tribute show for the film Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man

Cocker also contributed to the soundtrack for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, writing and performing three tracks: “This Is the Night”, “Do the Hippogriff” and “Magic Works”. He appeared briefly in the film as lead singer of the band The Weird Sisters. The fictitious group also featured Jonny Greenwood and Phil Selway from Radiohead, Steve Mackey from Pulp, Jason Buckle from Relaxed Muscle and Steve Claydon from Add N to (X).In 2006 Cocker appeared on albums Monsieur Gainsbourg Revisited (song “I Just Came to Tell You That I’m Going”, (co-performed withKid Loco) and Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys (song “A Drop of Nelson’s Blood”). His song “Running the World” appears in the film Children of Men. Also in 2006, along with Steve Mackey, he ‘curated’ the two-CD compilation, The Trip, which featured a wide selection of tracks by artists as varied as The Fall, Gene Pitney, The Beach Boys, and The Polecats. He also co-wrote lyrics on the Charlotte Gainsbourg album 5:55, with Neil Hannon and members of Air. Cocker and Beth Ditto(The Gossip) recently collaborated on a cover version of Heaven 17’s “Temptation” at the NME Awards in London. In 2007, Cocker contributed to two songs on French electronica group Air’s album “Pocket Symphony” – performing on “One Hell of a Party” and (with Charlotte Gainsbourg) “The Duelist”. In 2008, Cocker contributed Born to Cry, (originally a Pulp song released on the Notting Hillsoundtrack CD – though not featured in the film and co-written by Richard Hawley) to Tony Christie’s album of songs by Sheffield based songwriters, Made in Sheffield. In 2010, he worked with the National Trust to produce an album of sounds recorded at 11 of Britain’s historically significant sites. In 2010 he also narrated Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf at the Royal Festival Hall. Jarvis sang vocals on the single “Synchronize” by Discodeine.

George R.R Martin

imageAmerican fantasy, horror and science fiction Novellist and short story writer George Raymond Richard Martin was born September 20, 1948. As a boy He began writing and selling monster stories for pennies to other neighborhood children, dramatic readings included. He also wrote stories about a mythical kingdom populated by his pet turtles; the turtles died frequently in their toy castle, so he finally decided they were killing each other off in “sinister plots”. Martin attended Mary Jane Donohoe School and then later Marist High School. While there he became an avid comic-book fan, developing a strong interest in the innovative superheroes being published by Marvel Comics and joined the fledgling comics fandom of the era, writing fiction for various fanzines and winning the Alley Award in 1965 for his prose superhero story “Powerman vs. The Blue Barrier”, the first of many awards he would go on to win for his fiction. In 1970 Martin earned a B. S. in Journalism from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, graduating summa cum laude; he went on to complete his M. S. in Journalism in 1971, also from Northwestern. Martin became a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War, and did alternative service work for two years (1972–1974) as a VISTA volunteer, attached to the Cook County Legal Assistance Foundation. An expert chess player, he also directed chess tournaments for the Continental Chess Association from 1973 to 1976. Then from 1976 to 1978 he was an English and journalism instructor at Clarke University (then Clarke College) in Dubuque, IA, becoming Writer In Residence at the college from 1978 to 1979. He became a full time writer After the sudden death of friend and fellow author Tom Reamy in the fall of 1977 and resigned from his job, and moved to Santa Fe in 1979.

imageAt the Age of 21 Martin began selling science fiction short stories professionally. His first sale was “The Hero” and His first story to be nominated for the Hugo Award and Nebula Awards was With Morning Comes Mistfall, published in 1973 in Analog magazine. Between 1977 and 1979 Martin became the Southwest Regional Director for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and from 1996 to 1998, he served as its vice-president.In 1976 Martin was nominated for two Hugo Awards at the 34th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), but lost both awards, to the novelette “…and Seven Times Never Kill Man” and the novella The Storms of Windhaven, co-written with Lisa Tuttle. Although Martin often writes fantasy or horror, a number of his earlier works are science fiction tales occurring in a loosely defined future history, known informally as “The Thousand Worlds” or “The Manrealm”. He has also written at least one piece of political-military fiction, “Night of the Vampyres”, collected in Harry Turtledove’s anthology The Best Military Science Fiction of the 20th Century and, The Armageddon Rag. In 1983 Martin was hired as a staff writer and then as an Executive Story Consultant, for the revival of the Twilight Zone. Martin also worked on Max Headroom and created the show’s “Ped Xing” character (the president of the Zic Zak corporation, Network 23’s primary sponsor). However the show was canceled in the middle of its second season. Martin was then hired for the fantasy Beauty and the Beast writing 14 of its episodes.

He also oversaw development of the multi-author Wild Cards book series, which takes place in a shared universe in which a small slice of post–World War II humanity gains superpowers after the release of an alien-engineered virus; new titles are still being published in the on-going series from Tor Books. In Second Person Martin “gives a personal account of the close-knit role-playing game (RPG) culture that gave rise to his Wild Cards shared-world anthologies”. Martin’s own contributions to Wild Cards have included Thomas Tudbury, “The Great and Powerful Turtle” – a powerful psychokinetic whose flying “shell” consisted of an armored VW Beetle. Other titles in the series include Low Ball and High Stakes. Martin’s novella, Nightflyers, was adapted into a 1987 feature film of the same title.

In 1991 Martin briefly returned to writing novels and began what would eventually turn into his epic fantasy series: A Song of Ice and Fire, which was inspired by the Wars of the Roses and Ivanhoe. It is currently intended to comprise seven volumes, including Game of Thrones, A Song of Ice and Fire and A Feast for Crows, which became The New York Times No. 1 Bestseller and The Wall Street Journal no 1 bestseller. A Feast for Crows was also nominated for both a Quill Award and the British Fantasy Award. The fifth book Dance with Dragons, was published July 12, 2011, and quickly became an international bestseller, including achieving a No. 1 spot on the New York Times Bestseller List and In 2012, A Dance With Dragons made the final ballot for science fiction and fantasy’s Hugo Award, World Fantasy Award, Locus Poll Award, and the British Fantasy Award and won the Locus Poll Award for Best Fantasy Novel. There are Two more novels in the Ice and Fire series: The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring.

He is also a screenwriter and television producer andis best known for A Song of Ice and Fire, his international bestselling series of epic fantasy novels which HBO adapted for its dramatic series Game of thrones after acquiring the television rights for the entire Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007. Titled Game of Thrones, it ran weekly for ten episodes, each approximately an hour long.Although busy completing A Dance With Dragons and other projects, George R. R. Martin was heavily involved in the production of the television series adaptation of his books he also participated in scriptwriting; the opening credits list him as a co-executive producer of the series. The first season was nominated for 13 Emmy Awards, ultimately winning two, one for its opening title credits and one for Peter Dinklage as Best Supporting Actor.

The second season of ten episodes, based on the second Ice and Fire novel A Clash of Kings, was nominated for 12 Emmy Awards, including another Supporting Actor nomination for Dinklage. It went on to win six of those Emmys in the Technical Arts categories. The first season of 10 episodes was also nominated for a 2012 Hugo Award, fantasy and science fiction’s oldest award, presented by the World Science Fiction Society each year at the annual Worldcon; the show went on to win the 2012 Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation, at the 70th World Science Fiction Convention, in Chicago, IL; Martin took home one of the three Hugo Award trophies. The second season episode “Blackwater”, written by George R.R. Martin, won the Hugo Award at the 71st World Science Fiction Convention, in San Antonio, Texas. Martin serves as the series’ co-executive producer, and In 2005 Lev Grossman of Time called Martin “the American Tolkien” and in 2011 Time Magazine listed him as one of the “most influential people in the world.”