Suicide Squad

The Suicide Squad is out on DVD IT takes place in the aftermath of Superman’s death. It features a US intelligence officer Amanda Waller assembles Task Force X, a team of dangerous criminals imprisoned at Belle Reve Prison, to be used as disposable assets in high-risk missions for the United States government reasoning that they’re all expendable and much cheaper than Special Forces Mercenaries. They consist of elite hitman Deadshot, (will Smith) former psychiatrist Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie), pyrokinetic ex-gangster El Diablo, opportunistic thief Captain Boomerang, genetic mutation Killer Croc, and specialized assassin Slipknot. Now armed with government weapons, they are placed under command of Colonel Rick Flag .

However One of Waller’s intended recruits is Flag’s girlfriend Dr. June Moone, an archaeologist who is possessed by a witch-goddess known as the “Enchantress”. Enchantress quickly turns on Waller, deciding to eradicate humankind with a mystical weapon and She besieges Midway City. Meanwhile Harley’s homicidal lover, the Joker, finds out about her predicament and tortures Belle Reve Security Officer Griggs into leading him to the facility where the nano bombs are made. Meanwhile Boomerang convinces Slipknot that the bombs are a ruse to keep them in check, with explosive results,

Then the squad is attacked by Enchantress’ minions. The Joker hijack’s a helicopter to try and rescue Harley Quinn. However Enchantress’ minions kidnap her. Deadshot learns the truth about Enchantress, compromising Flag in the process. They eventually locate Enchantress at a partially-flooded subway station. Killer Croc and a group of Navy SEALs, led by Lieutenant GQ Edwards, come up with a plan. The remaining squad members battle Enchantress together, but are ultimately defeated. The Enchantress then attempts to pursuade the Suicide Squad to join her instead. Later the squad members are returned to Belle Reve with ten years off their sentences. All but Captain Boomerang are allowed special privileges, however The Joker rescues Harley from Belle Reve for the inevitable sequel.

Hollow City by Ransom Riggs

Having read Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs I would like to read the thrilling follow-up “Hollow City”. It follows on from Miss Peregrine’s home for Peculiar Children and features ten peculiar children, including Jacob Portman, Hugh, Emma Bloom and Millard, who have managed to escape the destruction of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and are now being pursued by an army of deadly monsters including wights and Hollowghasts, to London the peculiar capital of the World. Where they hope to find a cure for Miss Peregrine who is still trapped in the body of a bird.

After fleeing in a boat from the hollowgasts, the peculiar children are caught up in a bad storm and end up on a beach pursued by wights, so they flee into the forests of the mainland. They discover that Miss Wren, is a ymbryne and has flown to London to rescue her other fellow ymbrynes, So, the peculiar children leave in search of her, in hopes that she can turn Miss Peregrine back into a human, before her human self is lost forever. They travel with Gypsies who’s leader has a peculiar son, whilst being pursued by wights

While looking for Miss Wren they encounter new allies and a menagerie of peculiar animals together with many hideous surprises including Wights and Hollowghasts, lurking round every dark corner before making it to St.Paul’s Cathedral where they enter an underground crypt and meet two peculiar children named Joel and Peter who are echolocators and seem to share one mind. They also meet a girl named Melina Manon who is gifted with telekinesis who agree to assist them in finding Miss Wren who is the only person who can turn Miss Peregrine’s back into her human form.

Cities for Life Day

Cities for Life Day is held annually on November 30 to celebrate the first abolition of the death penalty by a European state, which was decreed by Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor of Habsburg-Lorraine in 1786 for his Grand Duchy of Tuscany. On this occasion the participating cities show their commitment for life and against the death penalty. It is also held in recognition of Cesare Beccaria who was one of the greatest Italian Enlightenment writers, and wrote Of Crimes and Punishments (1764). In it, Beccaria put forth some of the modern arguments against the death penalty. His treatise was also the first full work of penology, advocating reform of the criminal law system. The book was the first full-scale work to tackle criminal reform and to suggest that criminal justice should conform to rational principles. As a consequence in Italy the first pre-unitarian state to abolish the death penalty was the Grand Duchy of Tuscany as of November 30, 1786, under the reign of Pietro Leopoldo, later Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II. So Tuscany was the first civil state in the world to do away with torture and capital punishment. Since then many more People have also abandoned the death penalty

“In 2012, 141 states abolished the Death Penalty either by law or on a de facto basis. Since 2007, the United Nations General Assembly has repeatedly called for a universal moratorium with a view toward total abolition of capital punishment. In 2011 progress was made in all regions of the world, particularly the United States: Illinois became abolitionist and in April 2012 Connecticut became the 17th state to abolish the death penalty, thus becoming the fifth American state to revoke capital punishment in the last five years.”

participating cities illuminate a symbolic monument, such as the Atomium in Brussels, the Colosseum in Rome and the Plaza de Santa Ana in Madrid. Participating cities in 2009 include more than 60 capitals worldwide, and over 1,200 cities and towns around the world, such as Rome, Brussels, Madrid, Ottawa, Mexico City, Berlin, Barcelona, Florence, Venice, Buenos Aires, Austin, Dallas, Antwerp, Vienna, Naples, Paris, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Reggio Emilia, Bogotá, Santiago de Chile.

By this symbolic action, these cities demand a stay of all executions worldwide. This initiative is promoted by the Community of Sant’Egidio and supported by the main international human rights organizations, gathered in the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty (Amnesty International, Ensemble contre la Peine de Mort, International Penal Reform, FIACAT). In 2005, the Cities for Life Day also featured the “Africa for Life” conference about the death penalty in Africa, in which 14 ministers of justice from as many African countries participated. The conference took place in Florence, Tuscany. Cities continue to join this cause, many in countries that maintain the death penalty. In 2012 there were 1625, of which 72 were capitals.

Thriller by Michael Jackson

Thriller by Michael Jackson was released 30 November 1982. It became—and currently remains—the world’s best-selling album, with estimated sales surpassing 65 million copies.It is the best-selling album in the United States and the first album to be certified 32x multi-platinum, having shipped 32 million album-equivalent units. The album won a record-breaking eight Grammy Awards in 1984, including Album of the Year. Seven singles were released from the album, all of which reached the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Thriller, was the follow-up to Jackson’s successful fifth album Off the Wall (1979), and explores genres similar to those of its predecessor, including pop, post-disco, rock and funk. Quincy Jones produced the album, while Jackson wrote four of its nine songs.

Thriller enabled Jackson to break down racial barriers in pop music, via his appearances on MTV and meeting with President of the United States Ronald Reagan at the White House. The album was one of the first to use music videos as successful promotional tools, and the videos for the songs “Thriller”, “Billie Jean” and “Beat It” all received regular rotation on MTV. In 2001, a special edition reissue of the album was released, which contains additional audio interviews, demo recordings and the song “Someone in the Dark”, which was a Grammy-winning track from the E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial storybook. In 2008, the album was reissued again as Thriller 25, containing remixes that feature contemporary artists, a previously unreleased song and a DVD, which features the short films from the album and the Motown 25 performance of “Billie Jean”. That same year the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, along with Jackson’s Off The Wall album.

In 2012, Slant Magazine placed Thriller at number one on its list of “Best Albums of the 1980s”. Rolling Stone placed the album at number 20 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. The album was listed by the National Association of Recording Merchandisers at number three on its list of the “Definitive 200 albums of all time”. Thriller was also included in the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry of culturally significant recordings, and the Thriller music video was included in the National Film Preservation Board’s National Film Registry of “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant films”.

The Wall by Pink Floyd

The classic album The Wall , was released as a double album by Progressive Rock band Pink Floyd on 30 November 1979. It was their eleventh album and last album released with the line-up of guitarist David Gilmour, bass guitarist and lyricist Roger Waters, keyboardist Richard Wright, and drummer Nick Mason before Wright was fired from the band. It was supported by a tour with elaborate theatrical effects, and adapted into a 1982 feature film, Pink Floyd – The Wall. The album features the band’s only single to top various charts, “Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2”.

As with Pink Floyd’s prior three albums, The Wall is a concept album, exploring themes of abandonment and personal isolation. It is a rock opera that follows Pink, a character whom Waters modeled after himself and the band’s original leader, Syd Barrett. Pink’s life begins with the loss of his father during the Second World War and continues with abuse from his schoolteachers, an overprotective mother, and the breakdown of his marriage; all contribute to his eventual self-imposed isolation from society, represented by a metaphorical wall.

Waters conceived the album during Pink Floyd’s 1977 In the Flesh Tour, when his frustration with the audience became so acute that he spat on the audience. The album features a harsher and more theatrical style than Pink Floyd’s previous albums. Wright was unceremoniously fired from the band by Waters during its production but remained as a salaried musician, performing with Pink Floyd during the Wall tour. The album was one of the best selling of 1980 and by 1999 it had sold over 23 million RIAA-certified units (11.5 million albums) making it the third highest certified album in the United States. Rolling Stone placed The Wall at number 87 on its list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”.

Saint Andrew’s Day

800px-Flag_of_Scotland.svgSaint Andrew (Greek: manly, brave, from ἀνδρεία, Andreia, “manhood, valour”), is the patron saint of Scotland, and St. Andrew’s Day (Scots: Saunt Andra’s Day, Scottish Gaelic: Latha Naomh Anndra) takes place on 30th November & is Scotland’s official national day. Although most commonly associated with Scotland, at least in the English-speaking world, Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Greece, Romania, Russia, Ukraine Barbados, Scotland, Ukraine, Russia, Romania, Patras in Greece, Amalfi in Italy, Luqa in Malta, and Esgueira in Portugal and of the Order of the Golden Fleece and the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.The New Testament states that Andrew is a Christian Apostle & was the brother of Simon Peter, by which it is inferred that he was likewise a son of John, or Jonah. He was born in Bethsaida on the Sea of Galilee. Both he and his brother Peter were fishermen by trade, hence the tradition that Jesus called them to be his disciples by saying that he will make them “fishers of men”.

At the beginning of Jesus’ public life, they were said to have occupied the same house at Capernaum.The Gospel of John states that Andrew was a disciple of John the Baptist, whose testimony first led him, and another unnamed disciple of John the Baptist to follow Jesus. Andrew at once recognized Jesus as the Messiah, and hastened to introduce him to his brother. Thenceforth, the two brothers were disciples of Christ. On a subsequent occasion, prior to the final call to the Apostolate, they were called to a closer companionship, and then they left all things to follow Jesus.In the gospels, Andrew is referred to as being present on some important occasions as one of the disciples more closely attached to Jesus, Andrew told Jesus about the boy with the loaves and fishes (John 6:8), with Philip told Jesus about the Greeks seeking Him, and was one of four (the others being Peter, James, and John) to hear Jesus’ teaching about what would soon happen.Eusebius quotes Origen as saying Andrew preached along the Black Sea and the Dnieper and Volga rivers as far as Kiev and Novgorod Hence he became a patron saint of Ukraine, Romania and Russia. According to tradition, he founded the See of Byzantium (Constantinople) in AD 38, installing Stachys as bishop.

According to Hippolytus of Rome, he preached in Thrace, and his presence in Byzantium is also mentioned in the apocryphal Acts of Andrew, written in the 2nd century; Basil of Seleucia also knew of Apostle Andrew’s mission in Thrace, as well as Scythia and Achaia. This diocese would later develop into the Patriarchate of Constantinople. Andrew is recognized as its patron saint.Andrew is said to have been martyred by crucifixion at the city of Patras (Patræ) in Achaea, on the northern coast of the Peloponnese. Early texts, such as the Acts of Andrew known to Gregory of Tours, describe Andrew as bound, not nailed, to a Latin cross of the kind on which Jesus is said to have been crucified; yet a tradition developed that Andrew had been crucified on a cross of the form called Crux decussata (X-shaped cross, or “saltire”), now commonly known as a “Saint Andrew’s Cross” — supposedly at his own request, as he deemed himself unworthy to be crucified on the same type of cross as Jesus had been. “The familiar iconography of his martyrdom, showing the apostle bound to an X-shaped cross, does not seem to have been standardized before the later Middle Ages,”

Mark Twain

American Author Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) was Born November 30, in 1835. He wrote, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “the Great American Novel.” Mark Twain was born during a visit by Halley’s Comet, and he predicted that he would “go out with it” as well. he grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

At first He apprenticed with a printer. Where He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion’s newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River. He then turned to journalism and while a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well-received. Twain had found his calling.

Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evolved into a chronicler of the vanities, hypocrisies and murderous acts of mankind. At mid-career, with Huckleberry Finn, he combined rich humour, sturdy narrative and social criticism. Twain was a master at rendering colloquial speech which helped to create and popularize a distinctive American literature built on American themes and language. Many of Twain’s works have been suppressed at times for various reasons. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has repeatedly been restricted in American high schools, for its frequent use of words now considered racist which were in common usage in the pre-Civil War period in which the novel was set. Although He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker, with his wit and satire earning him praise from presidents, artists, industrialists, European royalty, critics and peers alike, he lacked financial acumen, and although he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he squandered it on various ventures,and was often forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain’s first important work, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” was first published in the New York Saturday Press on November 18, 1865. Next, he was commissioned to write letters about his travel experiences, chronicling his experiences with his burlesque humour. The first journey he took was to ride the steamer Ajax in its maiden voyage to Hawaii. These humorous letters proved the genesis to his work with the San Francisco Alta California newspaper, which designated him a traveling correspondent for a trip from San Francisco to New York City via the Panama isthmus. This trip resulted in The Innocents Abroad or The New Pilgrims’ Progress. This is a record of a pleasure trip, written as If it were a record of a solemn scientific expedition having the gravity, profundity, and impressive incomprehensibility which are so proper to works of that kind.

In 1872, Twain published a second piece of travel literature, Roughing It, as a semi-sequel to Innocents. This was a semi-autobiographical account of Twain’s journey to Nevada and his subsequent life in the American West. The book lampoons American and Western society in the same way that Innocents critiqued the various countries of Europe and the Middle East. Twain’s next work. Entitled The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today was not a travel piece, as his previous two books had been, it focused more on the events of the day in American society, and was his first attempt at writing a novel. The book is also notable because it is Twain’s only collaboration; it was written with his neighbor Charles Dudley Warner. Twain’s next two works drew on his experiences on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi, was a series of sketches published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875, which featured Twain’s disillusionment with Romanticism. It eventually became the starting point for Life on the Mississippi.

Twain’s next major publication was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which drew on his youth in Hannibal. Modelled on Twain as a child, with traces of two schoolmates, John Briggs and Will Bowen. The book also introduced Huckleberry Finn, based on Twain’s boyhood friend Tom Blankenship. His next book, The Prince and the Pauper, was not as well received. It Tells the story of two boys born on the same day who are physically identical, who switch places. Pauper was Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction, and blame for its shortcomings is usually put on Twain for having not been experienced enough in English society, and also on the fact that it was produced after a massive hit. Twain’s next major published work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, solidified him as a noteworthy American writer. Some have called it the first Great American Novel, and the book has become required reading in many schools throughout the United States. Huckleberry Finn was an offshoot from Tom Sawyer and had a more serious tone than its predecessor. The main premise behind Huckleberry Finn is the young boy’s belief in the right thing to do, even though most believed that it was wrong.

Near the completion of Huckleberry Finn, Twain wrote Life on the Mississippi, this recounts Twain’s memories and new experiences after a 22-year absence from the Mississippi. Twain’s last work was his autobiography, which he dictated and thought would be most entertaining if he went off on whims and tangents in non-chronological order. Some archivists and compilers have rearranged the biography into more conventional forms, thereby eliminating some of Twain’s humour and the flow of the book. ,Mark Twain sadly passed away April 21 1910 however the continuing popularity of His novels has helped him become one of very few authors publishing new best-selling volumes in all 3 of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries