The Dandy

The first issue of long-running children’s comic, The Dandy Comic, was published on December 4th 1937, The Dandy was published in the United Kingdom by D. C. Thomson & Co. and was one of the first to use speech balloons. making it the world’s third-longest running comic, after Detective Comics (cover dated March 1937) and Il Giornalino (cover dated 1 October 1924). From August 2007 until October 2010, it was rebranded as Dandy Xtreme.The publishers have announced that the final printed edition will be issued on 4 December 2012, the comic’s 75th anniversary, after sales slumped to 8,000 a week from a high of two million a week in the 1950s, but The Dandy will continue to be available online at http://www.dandy.com

The first issue, under the name The Dandy Comic, was published on 4 December 1937. The most notable difference between this and other comics of the day was the use of speech balloons instead of captions under the frame. It was published weekly until 6 September 1941, when wartime paper shortages forced it to change to fortnightly, alternating with The Beano. It returned to weekly publication on 30 July 1949. From 17 July 1950 the magazine changed its name to The Dandy. In 1938, less than a year after the comic’s debut, the first Dandy Annual was released. Originally called The Dandy Monster comic, this was an annual bumper edition of the comic and has been released annually since then. In 1954 the first Desperate Dan Book was released, mostly consisting of reprints. Another was released in 1978, and it was released yearly between 1990 and 1992. Bananaman and Black Bob also had their own annuals. Although later issues were all comic strips, early issues had many text strips, with some illustrations. In 1940, this meant 12 pages of comic strips and 8 pages of text stories. Text stories at two pages each were “Jimmy’s Pocket Grandpa”, “British Boys and Girls Go West”, “There’s a Curse on the King” and “Swallowed by a Whale!”

In 1963 the first Dandy summer special was published, a joint Dandy-Beano summer special; the first exclusively Dandy Summer Special was released the following yearIn 1982 the Dandy comic libraries were released, which later became known as the Fun Size Dandy. These were small-format comics usually featuring one or two long stories starring characters from The Dandy and occasionally other DC Thomson comics. In September 1985, the ailing Nutty was merged with The Dandy, bringing with it the Bananaman strip, currently the third-longest-running strip still in the comic. Just over a year later, the short-lived Hoot was also merged with The Dandy, most notably incorporating the character Cuddles into the pre-existing comic strip Dimples to form Cuddles and Dimples, another of The Dandy’s longest running comic strips.

After 2004 The Dandy underwent a radical format overhaul. The comic changed format and content, reflecting a more television-oriented style, now printed on glossy magazine paper instead of newsprint. a new comic strip called “Office Hours” (a comic strip about the adventures of the writers of The Dandy) appeared, and two supposedly new ones also started,(“Jak” and “Dreadlock Holmes”). In 2007 The Dandy had another update, becoming the fortnightly comic-magazine hybrid Dandy Xtreme. Unlike previous incarnations, Dandy characters did not necessarily grace the cover every issue; instead, celebrities and other cartoon characters were featured; the first Dandy Xtreme had Bart Simpson on the cover. The Dandy Xtreme had a theme for each issue, usually a movie or TV show.

From 2010 The Dandy returned as a weekly comic and dropped “Xtreme” from its title. The contents received a major overhaul, and all the comic strips from the Xtreme era except for Desperate Dan, Bananaman and The Bogies were dropped. Korky the Cat, who appeared in the comic’s first issue in 1937 returned with many new comic strips & celebrity spoofs such as Cheryl’s Mole, Pre-Skool Prime Minister, George vs Dragon. The 76-page Christmas special featured a pantomime, a 12-page Harry Hill strip. More recent comics have also feaured “Punslinger”, “Dad’s Turn To Cook”, “My Freaky Family”, “Animals Eat The Funniest Things”, “Star T.Rex” and “Brian Damage”. Song parodies and fake recipes also appeared in The Dandy. The Royal Mail also launched a special stamp collection to celebrate Britain’s rich comic book history, which included The Dandy among many others & a follow-up to Waverly Book’s The History of The Beano: The Story So Far, called The Art and History of The Dandy, was released in August 2012, the Dandy’s 75th anniversary year.

Over its 75-year run hundreds of different comic strips have appeared in The Dandy, many of them for a very long time. including Desperate Dan and Korky the Cat, who both appeared in the first issue. Following mergers with Nutty and Hoot, the Dandy inherited a number of their strips, most notably Bananaman from Nutty and Cuddles from Hoot, who teamed up with a Dandy character to form a new strip entitled Cuddles and Dimples. Both have been quite long-running, having been in the Dandy since the 1980s and each having appeared on the front cover of both The Dandy and the comics from which they came from. The Dandy has also inherited Beryl the Peril, Puss ‘n’ Boots and Owen Goal from The Beezer & Topper. The Dandy has had a number of different cover stars including Korky the Kat, Desperate Dan and Jak and sometimes covers were given over to celebrities or current trends, Including the popular British comedian Harry Hill.

Ronnie Corbett

Scottish stand-up comedian, actor, writer and broadcaster, Ronnie Corbett, CBE was born 4 December 1930 in Edinburgh, and was educated at James Gillespie’s High School and the Royal High School in the city, but did not attend university. After leaving school, he decided he wanted to be an actor while performing in amateur theatricals at a church youth club. His first job, however, was with the Ministry of Agriculture. Corbett served his compulsory national service with the Royal Air Force, during which he was the shortest in height commissioned officer in the British Forces. A former aircraftman 2nd class, he was commissioned into the secretarial branch of the RAF as a pilot officer (national service) on 25 May 1950. He received the service number 2446942. He transferred to the reserve (national service list) on 28 October 1951, thereby ending his period of active service. He was promoted to flying officer on 6 September 1952.

Following National Service, Corbett moved to London to start his acting career. In one of his earliest stage appearances, he was billed as “Ronald Corbett” at Cromer, Norfolk, in Take it Easy in 1956, with Graham Stark. He appeared in Crackerjack as a regular in its early days, one episode with Winifred Atwell. He had a walk-on in an early episode of the 1960s series The Saint (as “Ronald Corbett”) and appeared in films including Rockets Galore! (1957), Casino Royale (1967), Some Will, Some Won’t (1970) and the film version of the farce No Sex Please, We’re British (1973).He achieved prominence in David Frost’s 1960s satirical comedy programme The Frost Report (with Barker) and subsequently starred in sitcoms such as No – That’s Me Over Here!, Now Look Here and Sorry!

Corbett starred in the first London production of the musical The Boys from Syracuse (as Dromio of Syracuse) in 1963 at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, alongside Bob Monkhouse. In 1965 he was in cabaret at Winston’s, Danny La Rue’s Mayfair nightclub. David Frost saw him and asked him to appear in The Frost Report. Corbett was in the West End, playing Will Scarlett in Lionel Bart’s Robin Hood musical Twang!!. It failed, leaving Corbett free to accept. It was whilst working at Danny La Rue’s nightclub that Corbett met Anne Hart, who he was to marry that year. The marriage lasted 51 years, until he died.

Corbett first worked with Ronnie Barker in The Frost Report (1966–67). The writers and cast were mostly Oxbridge graduates from Footlights. The show was a mixture of satirical monologues, sketches and music. Corbett and Barker were beginning to be thought of as a pair.They appeared with John Cleese in one of the most repeated comedy sketches in British television: the Class sketch. Corbett also starred in No – That’s Me Over Here!, a sitcom written by Frost Report writers Barry Cryer, Graham Chapman and Eric Idle (ITV 1967–70). Cryer and Chapman wrote two follow-ups: Now Look Here (BBC 1971–73) and The Prince of Denmark (BBC 1974). Corbett also appeared in Frost on Sunday (ITV 1968) and hosted The Corbett Follies (ITV 1969). From 1971 until 1987 Corbett’s appeared in the BBC television comedy show The Two Ronnies with Ronnie Barker, In which Barker and Corbett performed sketches and musical numbers, Corbett also presented a humorous monologue.

Corbett’s best-known role away from The Two Ronnies was as the 40-something Timothy Lumsden, dominated by his mother, in the sitcom Sorry! (1981–88). In 1996, he appeared on the première of the short-lived BBC game show Full Swing, hosted by Jimmy Tarbuck. Corbett played Reggie Sea Lions in the film Fierce Creatures, written by his former Frost Report colleague John Cleese. Corbett also hosted the game show Small Talk and portrayed Griselda in a television production of Cinderella in 2000. In 2004, Corbett appeared on the BBC news quiz Have I Got News for You and In 2005, Corbett reunited with Ronnie Barker for The Two Ronnies Sketchbook, comedy sketches from their original series with newly recorded material, Corbett also appeared with comedian Peter Kay in the music video for the Comic Relief single, a cover version of Tony Christie’s “Is This the Way to Amarillo?”

He performed in the Children’s Party at the Palace as Mr Tibbs, the Queen’s butler. In 2006, Corbett played a hyper-realised version of himself in Extras, caught taking drugs at the BAFTA Awards, He also starred as himself in Little Britain Abroad. He opened the centre in Cromer, Norfolk, named after Henry Blogg and was a guest in the BBC Radio 4 show Desert Island Discs in 2007. He also featured as a Slitheen in a Sarah Jane Adventures episode for Red Nose Day 2009 and appeared in the John Landis thriller comedy Burke & Hare. He was also a panellist in the BBC 1 comedy show Would I Lie to You? And starred of the Good Food HD programme Ronnie Corbett’s Supper Club with Rob Brydon and Steve Speirs. He also starred in a one-off special, The One Ronnie and From 2010, Corbett starred in the BBC Radio 4 sitcom When The Dog Dies, with Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent, who also wrote Sorry!

During his distinguished career Corbett garnered many awards and accolades, Already an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE), Corbett was promoted to Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2012 New Year Honours for services to entertainment and charity. Sadly On 31 March 2016, Corbett died at the age of 85, at Shirley Oaks Hospital in Shirley near Croydon, shortly after having been diagnosed with motor neurone disease. He is survived by his wife and two daughters.

Led Zeppelin

LedzepEpic Rock band Led Zeppelin finally split 4 December 1980 following the tragic death of their drummer John Bonham. Led Zeppelin are widely considered to be one of the most successful, innovative and influential rock groups in the history of music and were formed in 1968 after former Yardbirds Guitarist Jimmy Page recruited vocalist Robert Plant, drummer John Bonham, and John Paul Jones. The name Led Zeppelin stemmed from an old joke by Keith Moon and John Entwistle, of “The Who”, and Page stuck with that name to use for his new band. The name was subsequently changed to “Led Zeppelin”, to avoid a mispronunciation of “Leed Zeppelin.”Jimmy Page had a very specific idea in mind as to what he wanted Led Zeppelin to be, and wanted to add acoustic textures. Zeppelin’s sound became a marriage of blues, hard rock and acoustic music topped with heavy choruses – a combination that had never been done back in the 1960′s.

Led Zeppelin released relatively few singles, preferring their albums to be viewed as indivisible, whole listening experiences, helping to promote the concept of album-orientated rock. Their first two albums, Led Zeppelin and Led Zeppelin II with their heavy, guitar-driven blues rock sound, led to Led Zeppelin being regularly cited as one of the progenitors of heavy metal and hard rock, even though the band’s individualistic style drew from varied sources and transcends any single music genre. Their next two albums Led Zeppelin III AND Led Zeppelin IV incorporated wider musical influences, particularly from folk music; the tracks “Stairway to Heaven“, and “Kashmir” are among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and cemented the status of the group as “superstars”. Led Zeppelin’s sound has since become a prototype for countless rock bands ever since, and was one of the major driving forces behind the rock sound of the 1970′s.

Sadly though drummer John Bonham tragically died in 1980 and Following the death guitarist Jimmy Page refused to touch a guitar out of sadness for the loss of his friend Bonham. Singer Robert plant went on to have a successful solo career releasing a number of albums such as Now and Zen, Mighty Rearranger, Raising Sand, Lullaby and the Ceaseless Roar and Band of Joy. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have also reunited a number of times and the remaining members of Led Zeppelin plus Jason Bonham (John’s Son) also reunited for the a Awesome concert Celebration Day.

Dennis Wilson (Beach Boys)

American drummer, singer and songwriter Dennis Wilson was born December 4, 1944 in Inglewood, California. He was the middle brother of fellow Beach Boys members Brian Wilson and Carl Wilson and was a founding member of The Beach Boys, alongside his brothers, Brian and Carl, and cousin, Mike Love. Dennis Joined the Beach Boys thanks to his mother, Audree, and older cousin, Mike Love.

The Beach Boys formed in August 1961 and became hugely successful. Although the Beach Boys developed, an image based on the California surfing culture, Dennis was the only actual surfer in the band. During the first few years of the Beach Boys, Dennis was given the role of the drummer by his brother, Brian. He quickly learned the basics of drumming, and like the other members, he picked up more on the job.Although he rarely sang backing vocals on stage, occasionally taking a lead, his raspy-sounding vocals were a key ingredient to the group’s vocal blend in the studio, and in the late Sixties and Seventies his lead vocals lent a much-needed bluesy edge to an updating the Beach Boys’ sound, giving their music new dimensions

He sang lead vocals on the early Beach Boys recordings (“Little Girl (You’re My Miss America)” and “This Car of Mine” as well as the bridge verse on “Girls on the Beach”)and “Do You Wanna Dance?”. He also sang an impressive, faithful rendition of The Beatles’ “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away.” And accompanied himself on guitar and like the other Beach Boys became a multi-instrumentalist. Often Assisted by Daryl Dragon, who collaborated on Dennis’s solo album Pacific Ocean Blue. Dennis Wilson’s first major released composition was “Little Bird,” the B-side of the “Friends” single, coupled with “Be Still”. As Brian withdrew Dennis became a major creative force within the Beach Boys, writing many of thesongs which showed cosmic Gothic overtones. such as 20/20 (1969), Sunflower (1970), “So Tough” (1972) and Holland (1973). In 1971, Dennis injured his hand and Ricky Fataar took over as the group’s drummer between 1972 and 1974. During this period Dennis acted as a co-frontman alongside Mike Love, playing keyboards and singing. In 1974 Wilson returned to drumming.

Early in 1963, Dennis teamed with Brian’s former collaborator Gary Usher to form the Four-Speeds, And they released the single “RPM”/”My Stingray”. On December 4, 1970, Wilson released the solo singles”Lady” and “Sound of Fire”, under the name “Dennis Wilson & Rumbo”, this was later covered by American Spring and released as the B-side to their single “Shyin’ Away.”. Wilson released his debut solo album Pacific Ocean Blue in 1977. His collaborators on the album included Daryl Dragon (the ‘Captain’ of Captain & Tennille) and Gregg Jakobson, which became popular. Pacific Ocean Blue’s follow-up album, Bambu, included the songs: “It’s Not Too Late”, “Constant Companion”, “All Alone”, and “Under The Moonlight”. Both PacificBlue and Bambu were rereleased in 2008. Later years saw Wilson battling alcohol abuse. Smoking had also taken a toll on his voice, although the resultant gravelly effect helped define him as a singer.

Sadly On December 28, 1983, shortly after his 39th birthday, Wilson drowned at Marina Del Rey, Los Angeles, after drinking all day and diving in the afternoon to recover items he had thrown overboard at the marina from his yacht three years prior. Dennis Wilson’s body was buried at sea off the California coast (coordinates 33° 53.9 N, 118° 38.8 W) by the U.S. Coast Guard on January 4, 1984. His song “Farewell My Friend” was played at the funeral. Wilson’s life has inspired the 2014 biopic The Drummer, directed and cowritten by Randall Miller. With Aaron Eckhart as Wilson and Vera Farmiga as former Fleetwood Mac member Christine McVie. It co stars Chloë Grace Moretz and Rupert Grint.

Gary Rossington( Lynyrd Synyrd)

SkynyrdGary Rossington, the vocalist with with Lynyrd Skynyrd was born 4 December 1951. lynyrd Skynyrd were known for popularizing the Southern hard rock genre during the 1970s Lynyrd Skynyrd were Originally formed In the summer of 1964, when teenage friends Ronnie Van Zant, Allen Collins, and Gary Rossington formed the band “The Noble Five” in Jacksonville, Florida. The band changed in 1965 to “My Backyard”, when Larry Junstrom and Bob Burns joined. In 1968, the group won a local Battle of the Bands contest and the opening slot on several Southeast shows for the California-based psychedelic rock band Strawberry Alarm Clock. the group eventually settled on the name “Leonard Skinner”, a mocking tribute to a physical-education teacher at Robert E. Lee High School, Leonard Skinner, who was notorious for strictly enforcing the school’s policy against boys having long hair.

In 1972 the band was discovered at one of their shows at a club in Atlanta, GA and changed the spelling of the band name to “Lynyrd Skynyrd”. Their fan base continued to grow rapidly throughout 1973, largely due to their opening slot on The Who’s Quadrophenia tour in the United States. Their 1974 follow-up, Second Helping, was the band’s breakthrough hit, and featured their most popular single, “Sweet Home Alabama” helping them rise to worldwide recognition. Lynyrd Skynyrd’s third album, Nuthin’ Fancy, was released in 1975 and the fourth album Gimme Back My Bullets was released in January 1976, but did not achieve the same success as the previous two albums.

Steve Gaines joined the band in June 1976 and the newly-reconstituted band recorded the double-live album One More From the Road at the Fox Theatre (Atlanta, Georgia) in Atlanta, and performed at the Knebworth festival, which also featured The Rolling Stones. The next album 1977′s Street Survivors turned out to be a showcase for guitarist/vocalist Steve Gaines and included the iconic rock anthem “Free Bird”. Sadly though, On October 20, 1977, just three days after the release of Street Survivors, and at the peak of their success, three members (Including Gaines) all died in an airplane crash, Following the crash and the ensuing press, Street Survivors became the band’s second platinum album and reached No. 5 on the U.S. album chart. The single “What’s Your Name” reached No. 13 in January 1978. Surviving members re-formed in 1987 for a reunion tour with lead singer Ronnie Van Zant’s younger brother Johnny as frontman. A version of the band continues to tour and record, with only Gary Rossington of its original members remaining as of 2012. Lynyrd Skynyrd was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 13, 2003. Sadly Bob Burns died recently in 2015 however Lynyrd Skynyrd remain popular with a hardcore group of fans.