Maurice Gibb (Bee Gees)

BGsBest remembered for being one third of the phenomenally successful Bee Gees, Maurice Gibb sadly passed away on 12th January 2003. Born 1949 He and his two brothers, Barry and Robin, made their earliest performances at local movie theatres in Manchester in 1955, singing between shows. The Gibb brothers seemed to have a natural talent that allowed them to write hit songs with ease. In the 1950′s they emigrated to Australia with their parents.

In the mid-1960′s the Gibb brothers returned to England to further their singing careers. Their early recordings, including dramatic hits such as Massachusetts (1967), drew comparisons with the Beatles. The trio reached the Top Ten with I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You and I Started a Joke (both 1968) but split briefly after the relative failure of their concept album Odessa (1969), but reunited in 1970 and had hits with Lonely Days (1970) and How Can You Mend a Broken Heart (1971). They returned to the charts with Main Course in 1975 – in which they produced a new sound – the emphasis being on dance rhythms, high harmonies, and a funk beat, and their trademark falsetto harmonies propelled the Bee Gees right to the forefront of the disco movement and turned it into a global phenomenon, with hits including Stayin’ Alive Jive Talkin’, You Should Be Dancing and Night Fever, which featured on the soundtrack of the 1977 film Saturday Night Fever, starring John Travolta

Their success was not limited to recordings issued under their own name either. Individually and together they’ve also written and produced major hits for artists including Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers, as well as Frankie Valli. During a lengthy career, they have sold more than 200 million records and become the first and only songwriters to place five songs in the Top Ten at the same time. In 1997 the band was also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and are among the most successful vocal groups in rock and roll history, Sadly though both Maurice and Robin Gibb have passed away, but they have left the world some fantastic music.

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