Without fail by Lee Child

I would like to read Without Fail by Lee Child, the sixth political thriller featuring, Jack Reacher, a former military police major in early middle age, who grew up as a well-traveled Army brat and subsequently spent 18 years overseas in the military police, and has a parochial view of the country he served. Now a rootless and reluctant civilian, he finds himself back in America, seeing his country for the first time with an immigrant’s eye.

Jack Reacher arrives in Atlantic City, New Jersey from California after hitching a ride with a couple of aging musicians. Meanwhile former North Dakota senator and Vice-President Elect Brook Armstrong starts receiving death threats and the Secret Service suspects that one of their own agents may be behind them so they decide to get an outsider to investigate. So M.E. (Mary Ellen) Froelich, a beautiful agent from the United States Secret Service is dispatched by her boss Stuyvesant to locate former Military Policeman Jack Reacher. Reacher accepts the job but figures he needs someone to watch his back, so he calls up old army buddy Frances Neagley, now running a security outfit out of Chicago. Neagley is as tough as Reacher and twice as sex.

Froelich considers Reacher the perfect candidate to assassinate the vice president of the United States. Theoretically, of course, So Froelich asks Reacher how he would go about killing the Vice-President-Elect and find any potential holes in the defence of the Vice-President, as Countering these would help in the protection of the Vice-President-Elect. So with the help of old Army colleague Frances Neagley, Reacher attempts to find the ones responsible before they can carry out the assassination. Then While working together, Reacher and Froelich begin a relationship, but Reacher realizes she is still in love with his deceased brother, Joe. After Froelich takes a bullet meant for her protectee, Reacher swears vengeance against the still unknown attackers….

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Lawn Chair Larry

Larry Walters (Better known as “Lawn Chair Larry”), was born 19th April in 1949. He is best remembered as the American truck driver who took flight on July 2, 1982, in a homemade airship Dubbed Inspiration I, which consisted of an ordinary patio chair with 45 helium-filled weather balloons attached to it. Walters had always dreamed of flying, but was unable to become a pilot in the United States Air Force because of his poor eyesight. Walters had first thought of using weather balloons to fly at age 13 and 14, after seeing them hanging from the ceiling of a military surplus store. Twenty years later he decided to do so. His intention was to attach a few helium-filled weather balloons to his patio chair, cut the anchor, and then float above his backyard at a height of about 30 feet (9.1 m) for several hours. He planned to use a pellet gun to burst balloons to float gently to the ground.

So in mid-1982, Walters and his girlfriend, Carol Van Deusen, purchased 45 eight-foot weather balloons and obtained helium tanks from California Toy Time Balloons, by using a forged requisition from his employer, FilmFair Studios, saying the balloons were for a television commercial. Walters then attached the balloons to his lawn chair, filled them with helium, put on a parachute, and strapped himself into the chair in the backyard of his home in San Pedro. He took his pellet gun, a CB radio, sandwiches, cold beer, and a camera.

However When his friends cut the cord that tied his lawn chair to his Jeep, Walters’ lawn chair rapidly shot up to a height of about 15,000 feet (4,600 m). At first, he did not dare shoot any balloons, fearing that he might unbalance the chair and fall out. So He slowly drifted over Long Beach until he crossed the primary approach corridor of Long Beach Airport, causing widespread chaos. After 45 minutes in the sky, he shot several balloons, and then accidentally dropped his pellet gun overboard.

As He descended slowly, he caused even more chaos when his balloons’ dangling cables got caught in a electricitiy power line, causing a 20-minute blackout in a Long Beach neighborhood. Eventually though, Walters was able to climb to the ground, whereupon He was immediately arrested by waiting members of the Long Beach Police Department; when asked by a reporter why he had done it, Walters replied, “A man can’t just sit around.” Regional safety inspector Neal Savoy was reported to have said, “We know he broke some part of the Federal Aviation Act, and as soon as we decide which part it is, some type of charge will be filed. If he had a pilot’s license, we’d suspend that. But he doesn’t.” Walters received the top prize from the Bonehead Club of Dallas for his adventure, and also gets an honourable mention on the Darwin Awards website His flight was also widely reported in many newspapers.

Lord Byron FRS

English poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, later George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron, FRS sadly passed away 19 April 1824 after developing a violent fever caused by sepsis. Born 22 January 1788. Byron grew up in Aberdeenshire. In 1798, the 10-year-old boy became the 6th Baron Byron of Rochdale and inherited the ancestral home, Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire. His mother Catherine took him to England”.Upon the death of Byron’s mother-in-law Judith Noel, the Hon. Lady Milbanke, in 1822, he changed his surname to “Noel”. He was also sometimes referred to as “Lord Noel Byron”. Lady Byron eventually succeeded to the Baronetcy of Wentworth, becoming “Lady Wentworth”. Byron was educated at Aberdeen Grammar School, and in August 1799 entered the school of Dr. William Glennie, in Dulwich. Until 1801 when he was sent to Harrow until July 1805. And represented the school during the very first Eton v Harrow cricket match at Lord’s in 1805. Byron fell in love with Mary Chaworth, whom he met while at school and refused to return to Harrow until January 1804 “He later wrote Childish Recollections about his Harrow friendships, He then attended Trinity College, Cambridge. where he met John Edleston for whom Byron composed Thyrza, a series of elegies.

Whilst at Cambridge he befriended John Cam Hobhouse and Francis Hodgson, a Fellow at King’s College. While not at school or college, Byron lived with his mother in Southwell, Nottinghamshire and befriended Elizabeth Pigot and her brother, John, with whom he staged two Plays . Byron Published his first book of poems Fugitive Pieces, when was only 14. He then wrote Hours of Idleness, which collected many of the previous poems, along with more recent compositions. This attracted savage, anonymous criticism in the Edinburgh Review and prompted his first major satire, English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, which angered his critics so much they challenged him to a duel.

After his return from his travels, the poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, was published. The first two cantos of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage were published in 1812. He followed up his success with the poem’s last two cantos, plus “Oriental Tales”: The Giaour, The Bride of Abydos, The Corsair and Lara. he also met Thomas Moore. Byron racked up numerous debts as a young man. His Mother lived at Newstead during this time, in fear of her son’s creditors. He had planned to spend early 1808 cruising with his cousinGeorge Bettesworth, aboard the 32-gun frigate HMS Tartar. Sadly Bettesworth died at the Battle of Alvøen in May 1808 . So Byron went on the Grand Tour of the Mediterranean instead. He had read about the Levant and the Ottoman and Persian lands as a child, and was attracted to Islam. ”He travelled with John Hobhouse from England over Portugal, Spain and the Mediterranean to Albania and spent time at the court of Ali Pasha of Ioannina, and in Athens.

Byron Wrote a letter in Portugal to his friend Mr. Hodgson describing his mastery of Portuguese swear words and insults. Byron enjoyed his stay in Sintra which he described in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage as “glorious Eden”. From Lisbon he travelled to Seville, Jerez de la Frontera, Cadiz, Gibraltar then to Malta and Greece. While in Athens, Byron met 14-year-old Nicolò Giraud, who  taught him Italian.  Byron sent Giraud to school at a monastery in Malta and bequeathed him a sizeable sum of seven thousand pounds sterling. The will, however, was later cancelled. During his stay in Athens Byron wroteMaid of Athens for a 12-year-old girl, Teresa Makri  and reportedly offered £500 for her. The offer was not accepted.Byron made his way to Smyrna, where he and Hobhouse sailed to Constantinople aboard HMS Salsette. While Salsette was anchored awaiting Ottoman permission to dock at the city, on 3 May 1810 Byron and Lieutenant Ekenhead, of Salsette‘s Marines, swam the Hellespont. Byron commemorated this feat in the second canto of Don Juan. He returned to England from Malta in June 1813 aboard HMS Volage.

Byron left England again and travelled through Belgium and up the Rhine River. In 1816 he settled at the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva, Switzerland, with his personal physician, the young, brilliant, and handsome John William Polidori. There Byron befriended the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Shelley’s future wife Mary Godwin. He was also joined by Mary’s stepsister,Claire Clairmont, with whom he had had an affair in London. Kept indoors at the Villa Diodati by the “incessant rain” of “that wet, ungenial summer” over three days in June, the five turned to reading fantastical stories, including Fantasmagoriana, and then devising their own tales. Mary Shelley produced what would become Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, and Polidori was inspired by a fragmentary story of Byron’s, Fragment of a Novel, to produce The Vampyre. Byron’s story fragment was published as a postscript to Mazeppa; he also wrote the third canto of Childe Harold. Byron stayed in Venice, after falling in love with Marianna Segati, in whose Venice house he was lodging, and who was soon replaced by 22-year-old Margarita Cogni; both women were married . Cogni could not read or write, and she left her husband to move into Byron’s Venice house. Byron decided to escape the censure of British society (due to allegations of sodomy and incest) by living abroad, thereby freeing himself of the need to conceal his sexual interests .Byron left England in 1816 and did not return.

In 1816, Byron visited San Lazzaro degli Armeni in Venice,  where With the help of Father H. Avgerian, an Abbott of the Mechtarist Order He learned the Armenian language,and attended many seminars about language and history. He wrote English Grammar and Armenian (Kerakanutyun angğiakan yev hayeren) in 1817, and Armenian Grammar and English (Kerakanutyun hayeren yev angğiakan) in 1819, which included quotations fromclassical and modern Armenian. Intrigued by the language, Byron affirmed in his memoirs that “God spoke to the world in Armenian.” Byron also participated in the compilation of the English Armenian dictionary (Barraran angghieren yev hayeren, 1821) His two main translations are the Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians, two chapters of Movses Khorenatsi’s History of Armenia and sections of Nerses of Lambron’s Orations. His fascination was so great that he even considered a replacement of the Cain story of the Bible with that of the legend of Armenian patriarch Haik. His profound lyricism and ideological courage inspired many Armenian poets such as Ghevond Alishan, Smbat Shahaziz, Hovhannes Tumanyan, Ruben Vorberian and others. In 1817, he journeyed to Rome. On returning to Venice, he wrote the fourth canto of Childe Harold. About the same time, he sold Newstead and published Manfred, Cain and The Deformed Transformed. The first five cantos of Don Juan were written between 1818 and 1820, he also met the young aristocrat Countess Theresa Guiccioli, and asked her to elope with him.

Lord Byron lived in Ravenna between 1819 and 1821. Here he continued the Don Juan and wrote the Ravenna Diary, My Dictionary and Recollections. He also received a visit from Thomas Moore, to whom he confided his autobiography or “life and adventures” which was,burned in 1824, a month after Byron’s death.  he finished Cantos 6–12 of Don Juan at Pisa, and in the same year he joined with Leigh Hunt and Percy Bysshe Shelley in starting a short-lived newspaper, The Liberal and started giving dinner parties; his guests included the Shelleys, Edward Ellerker Williams, Thomas Medwin, John Taaffe and Edward John Trelawney. Shelley and Williams rented a house on the coast and had a schooner built. Byron decided to have his own yacht, and engaged Trelawny’s friend, Captain Daniel Roberts, to design and construct the boat. Named the Bolivar, it was later sold to Charles John Gardiner, 1st Earl of Blessington, and Marguerite, Countess of Blessington, when Byron left for Greece in 1823. Byron attended the funeral of Shelley after Williams and Shelley drowned in a boating accident on 8 July 1822. His last Italian home was Genoa, where he was still accompanied by the Countess Guiccioli. In 1823, he was approached by representatives of the movement for Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire. With the assistance of his banker and Captain Daniel Roberts, Byron chartered the Brig Hercules to take him to Greece. On 16 July, Byron left Genoa arriving atKefalonia in the Ionian Islands on 4 August.

Between 1815 and 1823 the Hercules was in service between England and Canada. Suddenly in 1823, the ship’s Captain decided to sail to Genoa and offer the Hercules for charter. After taking Byron to Greece, the ship returned to England, where Sadly it ran aground in 1852, aground near Hartlepool, only 25 miles south of Sunderland, where in 1815, her keel was laid. Byron spent £4000 of his own money to refit the Greek fleet, then sailed for Missolonghi in western Greece, arriving on 29 December, to join Alexandros Mavrokordatos, a Greek politician with military power. When the famous Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen heard about Byron’s heroics in Greece, he voluntarily resculpted his earlier bust of Byron in Greek marble. Mavrokordatos and Byron planned to attack the Turkish-held fortress of Lepanto, at the mouth of the Gulf of Corinth. Byron employed a fire-master to prepare artillery and took part of the rebel army under his own command, despite his lack of military experience. Sadly though before the expedition could sail, on 15 February 1824, he fell ill, and the usual remedy of bloodletting weakened him further. He recovered partially, but in early April he caught a violent cold which was treated with more therapeutic bleeding. It is suspected this treatment, carried out with unsterilised medical instrumentation, may have caused him to develop sepsis. He developed a violent fever, and died on 19 April 1824.

Had Byron had lived and gone on to defeat the Ottomans, he might have been declared King of Greece. Alfred, Lord Tennyson would later recall the shocked reaction in Britain when word was received of Byron’s death. Greeks mourned Lord Byron deeply, and he became a hero.The national poet of Greece, Dionysios Solomos, wrote a poem about the unexpected loss, named To the Death of Lord Byron and a suburb of Athens is called Vyronas in his honour. Byron’s body was embalmed, but the Greeks wanted some part of their hero to stay with them. According to some sources, his heart remained at Missolonghi.His other remains were sent to England for burial in Westminster Abbey, but the Abbey refused for reason of “questionable morality”.Huge crowds viewed his body as he lay in state for two days in London. He is buried at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Hucknall, Nottinghamshire. At her request, Ada Lovelace, the child he never knew, was buried next to him. In later years, the Abbey allowed a duplicate of a marble slab given by the King of Greece, which is laid directly above Byron’s grave. Byron’s friends raised the sum of 1,000 pounds to commission a statue of the writer; Thorvaldsen offered to sculpt it for that amount.However, for ten years after the statue was completed in 1834, most British institutions turned it down, and it remained in storage. The statue was refused by the British Museum, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Westminster Abbey and theNational Gallery.Trinity College, Cambridge, finally placed the statue of Byron in its library. In 1969, 145 years after Byron’s death, a memorial to him was finally placed in Westminster Abbey.

Dudley Moore CBE

Best known as being one half of classic comedy duo Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, The late great English actor, comedian and composer Dudley Moore CBE, was Born 19th April 1935, He first came to prominence as one of the four writer-performers in the ground-breaking comedy revue Beyond the Fringe in the early 1960s, and then became famous as half of the highly popular television double-act he formed with Peter Cook. His fame as a comedy film actor was later heightened by success in hit Hollywood films such as 10 with Bo Derek and Arthur in the late 1970s and early 1980s, respectively. He received an Oscar nomination for the latter role. He was frequently referred to in the media as “Cuddly Dudley” or “The Sex Thimble”, a reference to his short stature and reputation as a “ladies’ man”.

AN AUDIENCE with Dudley MOORE http://youtu.be/bRShQGG5zDo

He had a prolific film career and appeared in many other films too including The Wrong Box, Bedazzled, 30 Is a Dangerous Age, Cynthia, The Bed-Sitting Room, Monte Carlo or Bust, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Hound of the Baskervilles, Foul Play, 10, Derek and Clive Get the Horn, Wholly Moses! Arthur, Six Weeks, Lovesick, Romantic Comedy, Unfaithfully Yours, Micki + Maude, Best Defense, Santa Claus: The Movie Like Father Like Son Arthur 2: On the Rocks The Adventures of Milo and Otis, Crazy People, Blame It on the Bellboy, Really Wild Animals, Dudley Daddy’s Girls, Parallel Lives, The Disappearance of Kevin Johnson and The Mighty Kong.

Sadly On 30 September 1999, Moore announced that he was suffering from the terminal degenerative brain disorder progressive supranuclear palsy, some of whose early symptoms were so similar to intoxication that he had been accused of being drunk, and that the illness had been diagnosed earlier in the year. In recognition of his outstanding contribution to Comedy Moore was appointed a Commander of the Order of The British Empire (CBE) in 2001 and Despite his deteriorating condition, he attended the ceremony, mute and wheelchair-bound, at Buckingham Palace to collect his honour. He died on 27 March 2002, as a result of pneumonia, secondary to immobility caused by the palsy, in Plainfield, New Jersey. Rena Fruchter was holding his hand when he died, and she reported his final words were, “I can hear the music all around me.” Moore was interred in Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. Fruchter later wrote a memoir of their relationship (Dudley Moore, Ebury Press, 2004). In December 2004, Channel 4 broadcast Not Only But Always, a TV movie dramatising the relationship between Moore and Cook, although the principal focus of the production was on Cook. The relationship between the two was also the subject of a stage play called Pete and Dud: Come Again.

J.G. Ballard

English novelist and short story writer James Graham “J. G.” Ballard sadly died 19 April 2009 from Prostate Cancer. Born 15 November 1930. He was also a prominent member of the New Wave movement in science fiction. His best-known books are Crash (1973), which was adapted into a (rather strange) film by David Cronenberg, and the semi-autobiographical Empire of the Sun (1984), which was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

Empire of the Sun is Based on Ballard’s boyhood in the Shanghai International Settlement and internment by the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War, and recounts the story of a young British boy, Jaime Graham, who lives with his parents in Shanghai. After the Pearl Harbor attack, the Japanese occupy the Shanghai International Settlement, and in the following chaos Jim becomes separated from his parents. He spends some time in abandoned mansions, living on remnants of packaged food. Having exhausted the food supplies, he decides to try to surrender to the Japanese Army. After many attempts, he finally succeeds and is interned in the Lunghua Civilian Assembly Center. Although the Japanese are “officially” the enemies, Jim identifies partly with them, both because he adores the pilots with their splendid machines and because he feels that Lunghua is still a comparatively safe place for him. However the food supply also runs short here and Jim barely survives, with people around him starving to death. The camp prisoners are forced upon a march to Nantao, with many dying along the route. However some are saved from starvation by air drops from American Bombers.

The book was adapted by Tom Stoppard in 1987. The screenplay was filmed by Steven Spielberg, to critical acclaim, being nominated for six Oscars and winning three British Academy Awards (for cinematography, music and sound). It starred 13-year-old Christian Bale, as well as John Malkovich and Miranda Richardson; it also featured a cameo by the 21 year old Ben Stiller, in a dramatic role.The literary distinctiveness of Ballard’s work has given rise to the adjective “Ballardian”, defined by the Collins English Dictionary as “resembling or suggestive of the conditions described in J. G. Ballard’s novels and stories, especially dystopian modernity, bleak man-made landscapes and the psychological effects of technological, social or environmental developments.” Sadly Ballard was diagnosed with prostate cancer in June 2006. In 2008, The Times included Ballard on its list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945

Tim Curry

British actor, voice actor and singer Tim Curry was born 19 April 1946 in Grappenhall, Cheshire. Curry spent most of his childhood in Plymouth, Devon; but, after his father’s death from pneumonia in 1958, his family moved to South London. Curry then went to boarding school and attended Kingswood School in Bath, Somerset. He developed into a talented boy soprano (treble). Deciding to concentrate on acting, Curry graduated from the University of Birmingham with a combined degree in English and Drama (BA Drama & Theatre Studies, 1968).

Curry’s first full-time role was as part of the original London cast of the musical Hair in 1968, where he first met Richard O’Brien who went on to write The role of, Dr Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Show. Originally, Curry rehearsed the character with a German accent and peroxide blond hair, and later, with an American accent. Curry originally thought the character was merely a laboratory doctor dressed in a white lab coat. However, at the suggestion of director Sharman, the character evolved into the diabolical mad scientist and transvestite with an upper class Belgravia accent that carried over to the cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show and made Curry both a star and a cult figure. He continued to play the character in London, Los Angeles and New York City until 1975.

Shortly after the end of Rocky Horror’s run on Broadway, Curry returned to the stage with Tom Stoppard’s Travesties, which ran in London and New York from 1975 to 1976. Travesties was a Broadway hit which won two Tony Awards (Best Performance by an Actor for John Wood and Best Comedy), as well as the New York Drama Critics Circle Award (Best Play), and Curry’s performance as the famous dadaist Tristan Tzara received good reviews. In 1981, Curry formed part of the original cast in the Broadway show Amadeus, playing the title character, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He was nominated for his first Tony Award (Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play) for this role, but lost out to his co-star Ian McKellen, who played Antonio Salieri. In 1982, Curry took the part of the Pirate King in the Drury Lane production of Joe Papp’s version of The Pirates of Penzance opposite George Cole.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released on film in 1975 and became a huge international cult classic. After this success Curry began to star in many films, acting in supporting roles, such as Robert Graves in the British horror film The Shout, as Johnny LaGuardia in the cult classic, Times Square, as Daniel “Rooster” Hannigan in Annie, and as Jeremy Hancock in the political film The Ploughman’s Lunch. He also performed in The Rivals and in several plays with the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain, including The Threepenny Opera, Dalliance and Love For Love. In 1988, Curry did the national tour of Me and My Girl as the lead role of Bill Snibson.

Between 1989-90, Tim Curry returned once again to the New York stage in The Art of Success. In 1982 Curry portrayed Rooster Hannigan in the film adaptation of Annie, he also portrayed The Prince ofDarkness in the fantasy film Legend, directed by Ridley Scott. Curry appeared as Wadsworth in the mystery comedy film Clue, as Pennywise in the horror miniseries It and as Nigel Thornberry on the animated television series The Wild Thornberrys. Curry also starred as. Ray Porter in Pass the Ammo, Dr Thornton Poole in Oscar, Mr Hector in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Jigsaw in Loaded Weapon 1 and as Long John Silver in Muppet Treasure Island. He portrayed Dr Yevgeniy Petrov, in The Hunt for Red October and appeared in the 1993 reboot of The Three Musketeers as Cardinal Richelieu, he also appeared in the superhero film The Shadow as Farley Claymore and as Herkermer Homolka in the 1995 action adventure Congo. In 1993, Curry played Alan Swann in the Broadway musical version of My Favourite Year, earning a second Tony Award nomination, for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. Curry also starred in Charlie’s Angels as Roger Corwin, in Scary Movie 2 playing Professor Oldman. And he portrayed Thurnam Rice, in the critically acclaimed biographical film Kinsey.

In 2001, Curry starred as Scrooge in the musical version of A Christmas Carol that played at Madison Square Garden. In 2004, Curry began his role of King Arthur in Spamalot in Chicago. Moving to Broadway in 2005 earning him a third Tony nomination, for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. in 2006 Curry reprised this role in London’s West End at the Palace Theatre. He was nominated for a Laurence Olivier Award as the Best Actor in a Musical for the role, and also won the Theatregoers’ Choice Award them in 2012, Tim Curry appeared in Eric Idle’s play What About Dick? at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. In 2015 Curry was awarded an Artistic Achievement Award at the Actors Fund 19th Annual Tony Awards viewing Party.

Curry has also appeared in many television series, such as Eugene in Napoleon and Love, and guest roles in Armchair Theatre, Play for Today. He appeared in The courtroom drama Wiseguy, as Winston Newquay, the science fiction television series Earth 2 and the sitcom Rude Awakening. He has also guest starred in Roseanne, Tales from the Crypt, Lexx, The Naked Truth, Monk, Will & Grace, Psych, Agatha Christie’s Poirot and Criminal Minds. Curry has also appeared in a large number of television films and miniseries, including Three Men in a Boat, the titular role in Will Shakespeare, playing the role of Bill Sikes in a television adaptation of Oliver Twist, the children’s classic The Worst Witch, Titanic, Terry Pratchett’s The Colour of Magic (as Trymon)Alice and Return to Cranford. One of Curry’s best-known television roles, and best-known roles overall, is Pennywise the Dancing Clown in the 1990 horror miniseries Stephen King’s It.

Curry has also lent his voice talents to a large number of animated television series and films, such as the Serpent in The Greatest Adventure: Stories from the Bible and Captain Hook in the Fox animated series Peter Pan and the Pirates For which Curry won a Daytime Emmy Award. He also portrays Nigel Thornberry in The Wild Thornberrys. He also played the antagonist roles in animated series such as MAL in Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Skullmaster in Mighty Max, Dr Anton Sevarius in Gargoyles, George Herbert Walker ‘King’ Chicken in Duckman, Lord Dragaunus in The Mighty Ducks, Professor Finbar Calamitous in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, Slagar the Cruel in Redwall and G. Gordon Godfrey in Young Justice. He also appeared in FernGully: The Last Rainforest, The Pebble and the Penguin, all three Rugrats films, Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas, Scooby-Doo! and the Witch’s Ghost, The Wild, The Cat Returns, Valiant, Garfield: Tail of Two Kitties, Fly Me to the Moon.Curry’s voice also appears in numerous video games, such as, Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers and Gabriel Knight 3: Blood of the Sacred, Blood of the Damned, where he voiced the title character, Gabriel Knight, Toonstruck, Sacrifice, Brütal Legend and Dragon Age: Origins. His audio book work includes Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, Geraldine McCaughrean’s Peter Pan in Scarlet, Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the Abhorsen trilogy by Garth Nix.

He has also had some success as a solo musical artist, Having received classical vocal training as a boy, his musical influences included jazz vocalists such as Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong as well as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. He released his debut solo album Read My Lips. in 1978 which featured an eclectic range of songs (mostly covers) performed in diverse genres such as a reggae version of the Beatles’ song “I Will”, a rendition of “Wake Nicodemus” featuring the Pipes and Drums of the 48th Highlanders of Canada, and a bar-room ballad, “Alan”, composed by Canadian singer/songwriter Tony Kosinec. In 1979, Curry released his second album Fearless. The LP was more rock-oriented than Read My Lips and mostly featured original songs rather than cover versions such as: “I Do the Rock” and “Paradise Garage”. Curry’s third and final album, Simplicity, was released in 1981 and In 1989 The Best of Tim Curry was released featuring songs from his albums (including a live version of “Alan”) and a previously unreleased song, a live cover version of Bob Dylan’s “Simple Twist of Fate”. He also recorded a nine-track album for Lou Adler’s Ode Records in 1976 Which was eventually released as …From the Vaults in 2010 and included Curry’s rendition of the Supremes’ hit “Baby Love”.