Iggy Pop

American singer-songwriter, musician, producer and actor Iggy Pop ( James Newell Osterberg, Jr.) was born April 21, 1947 in Muskegon, Michigan, Osterberg was raised in a trailer park in Ypsilanti, Michigan. He began his music career as a drummer in various high school bands in Ann Arbor, Michigan, including the Iguanas, who cut several records such as Bo Diddley’s “Mona” in 1965.His later stage name, Iggy, is derived from the Iguanas. After exploring local blues-style bands such as the Prime Movers he dropped out of the University of Michigan and moved to Chicago to learn more about blues. While in Chicago, he played drums in blues clubs, helped by Sam Lay (the Paul Butterfield Blues Band), Inspired by Chicago blues as well as bands like The Sonics, MC5 and The Doors, he formed the Psychedelic Stooges and began calling himself Iggy. The band was composed of Iggy on vocals, Ron Asheton on guitar, Asheton’s brother Scott on drums, and Dave Alexander on bass. Their first show was played at a Halloween party at a house in Detroit, Michigan.

Pop saw The Doors perform in 1967 at the University of Michigan and was amazed by the stage antics and antagonism displayed by singer Jim Morrison. Morrison’s extreme behavior, while performing in a popular band, inspired the young Pop to push the boundaries of stage performance. Other influences on Pop’s vocals and persona were Mick Jagger and James Brown. Pop was the first performer to do a stage-dive, which he started at a concert in Detroit.Pop, who traditionally performs bare-chested, also performed such stage theatrics as rolling around in broken glass, exposing himself to the crowd, and vomiting on stage. He was the vocalist of influential proto-punk band The Stooges. In 1968, one year after their live debut the band signed with Elektra Records, following the footsteps of The Doors, The Stooges’ first album The Stooges, (on which Pop was credited as “Iggy Stooge”), was produced by John Cale in New York in 1969. Both it and the follow-up, Fun House produced by Don Gallucci in Los Angeles in 1970, sold poorly. Though the release of Fun House did not receive the recognition it expected, it was later ranked #191 in Rolling Stone’s ‘500 Greatest Albums of All Time’ in 2003.Shortly after the new members joined, the group disbanded due to Pop’s worsening heroin addiction.

In 1971, without a record deal, The Stooges kept performing in small clubs with a 5-piece line-up that included both Ron Asheton and James Williamson on guitars and Jimmy Recca on bass, Dave Alexander having been sacked by Pop the previous year when he turned up for a gig unable to play because of his chronic alcoholism (he died in 1975). That year Pop and David Bowie met at Max’s Kansas City, a nightclub and restaurant in New York City. Pop’s career received a boost from his relationship with Bowie when Bowie decided in 1972 to produce an album with Pop. With James Williamson as guitarist. However, since neither Pop nor Williamson were satisfied with any players in England, they decided to re-unite The Stooges. Ron Asheton grudgingly moved from guitar to bass. The recording sessions produced the rock landmark Raw Power. After its release Scott Thurston joined the band on keyboards/electric piano and Bowie continued his support, but Pop’s drug problem persisted. The Stooges’ last show in 1974 ended in a fight between the band and a group of bikers, and Drug abuse stalled his career again for several years.

After the second breakup of The Stooges, Pop made some recordings with James Williamson, as Kill City, credited jointly to Pop and Williamson. Unable to control his drug use Pop checked himself into a mental institution, UCLA’s neuropsychiatric institute, to try to clean up. Bowie was one of his few visitors there, and he continued to support his friend and collaborator. In 1976, Bowie took him along as his companion on the Station to Station tour. This was Pop’s first exposure to large-scale professional touring and he was impressed, particularly with Bowie’s work ethic. On March 21, 1976, Bowie and Pop were arrested together for marijuana possession in Rochester, New York, although charges were later dropped.

Bowie and Pop relocated to West Berlin to wean themselves off their respective drug addictions. In 1977, Pop signed with RCA Records and Bowie helped write and produce The Idiot and Lust for Life, Pop’s two most acclaimed albums as a solo artist, the latter featuring one of Pop’s best-known songs “The Passenger”. Lust for Life also featured another team of brothers, Hunt and Tony Fox Sales, sons of comedian Soupy Sales. Among the songs Bowie and Pop wrote together were “China Girl”, “Tonight”, and “Sister Midnight”, all of which Bowie performed on his own albums later on (the last being recorded with different lyrics as “Red Money” on the album Lodger). Bowie also played keyboards in Pop’s live performances, some of which are featured on the album TV Eye Live in 1978. In return, Pop contributed backing vocals on Bowie’s Low. Following the album TV Eye Live then released New Values in 1979. Produced by James Williamson with Stooge Scott Thurston playing guitar and keyboards. the album’s style harkened back to the guitar sound of the Stooges. He then released the albums Soldier. Bowie appeared on the song “Play it Safe”, performing backing vocals with the group Simple Minds. Soldier was followed by the album Party. In 1980, Pop published his autobiography I Need More, co-written with Anne Wehner. In 1982 he released the album Zombie Birdhouse. Pop’s fortunes changed when David Bowie recorded a cover of the song “China Girl” a major hit on Let’s Dance. Bowie recorded five more of their co-written songs including Lust for Life and New Values. Pop also contributed the title song to the 1984 film Repo Man (with Steve Jones, previously of the Sex Pistols, on guitar, and Nigel Harrison and Clem Burke, both of Blondie on bass and drums) and recorded the instrumental “Repo Man Theme”. In 1986 Pop released the new wave-influenced Blah-Blah-Blah, featuring the single “Real Wild Child”, a cover of “The Wild One”, originally written and recorded by Australian rock ‘n’ roll musician Johnny O’Keefe in 1958. Iggy Pop and Lou Reed contributed their singing voices to the animated film Rock & Rule. Pop performed the song “Pain & Suffering”. In 1987, Pop appeared (along with Bootsy Collins) on the album, Neo Geo, by Japanese composer Ryuichi Sakamoto. Pop’s follow-up to Blah Blah Blah, Instinct (1988), featured stripped-back, guitar-based sound and sounded more like the Stooges than his previous solo albums. Pop wrote the song “Living on the Edge of the Night” for the Ridley Scott thriller Black Rain; and “Love Transfusion”, a song originally written by Alice Cooper (who does backing vocals) and Desmond Child, for Wes Craven’s Shocker.

In 1990, Pop recorded Brick by Brick, produced by Don Was, with members of Guns N’ Roses and The B-52’s as guests, as well as backup vocals by many local Hollywood groups, the song “Candy”, was a duet with B-52’s singer Kate Pierson. Pop also starred in the controversial opera The Manson Family where he sang the role of prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi. he also contributed to the Red Hot Organization’s AIDS benefit album Red Hot + Blue project, singing a version of “Well Did You Evah!” in a duet with Deborah Harry. Pop appeared on the Nickelodeon show The Adventures of Pete and Pete. He played James Mecklenberg, Nona Mecklenberg’s father. In 1991, Pop and Whitey Kirst contributed the song “Why Was I Born (Freddy’s Dead)” to the soundtrack of the film Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare. In 1992, he collaborated with Goran Bregović on the soundtrack for the movie Arizona Dream by Emir Kusturica. Pop sang four of the songs: In the Deathcar, TV Screen, Get the Money, and This is a Film. He also collaborated with the New York City band White Zombie recording spoken word vocals on the intro and outro of the song “Black Sunshine” as well as playing the character of a writer in the video shot for the song. In 1993, Pop released American Caesar, including two successful singles, “Wild America” and “Beside You” and in 1994 Pop contributed to Buckethead’s album Giant Robot, including the songs “Buckethead’s Toy Store” and “Post Office Buddy”. He appears also on the Les Rita Mitsouko album Système D singing “My Love is Bad” with Catherine Ringer. In 1996, Pop’s 1977 song “Lust for Life” was featured in the film Trainspotting.

In 1996, Pop released The album Naughty Little Doggie, with Whitey Kirst on guitar, and the single “I Wanna Live”. In 1997, he remixed Raw Power to give it a rougher, more hard-edged sound and co-produced his 1999 album Avenue B with Don Was, releasing the single “Corruption”. In 1997, Pop wrote the soundtrack to the film The Brave And made a guest appearance on The science fiction series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine portraying a Vorta in an episode based upon the film The Magnificent Seven, titled “The Magnificent Ferengi”. Pop also contributed the theme song for “Space Goofs”. Pop supplied vocals for the 1999 Death in Vegas UK Top-10 single Aisha and appeared on Hashisheen, The End Of Law, a collaborative effort by Bill Laswell, reading on the tracks The Western Lands and A Quick Trip to Alamut. He also sang on the tracks “Rolodex Propaganda” and “Enfilade” by At the Drive-In in 2000. During New Year’s Eve 1997, Pop was the headliner for the annual Australian three-day concert the Falls Festival. Pop produced the 2001 albums Beat ‘Em Up, which gave birth to The Trolls, releasing the single “Football” featuring Trolls alumni Whitey Kirst and brother Alex. Pop’s 2003 album Skull Ring featured collaborators Sum 41, Green Day, Peaches, and The Trolls, as well as Ron and Scott Asheton, reuniting the three surviving founding members of The Stooges for the first time since 1974. Pop made a guest appearance on Peaches’s song Kick It as well as the video. in 2003, his first full-length biography was published. Gimme Danger – The Story of Iggy Pop by Joe Ambrose. Pop reformed The Stooges with bassist Mike Watt (formerly of the Minutemen) filling in for the late Dave Alexander, and Fun House saxophonist Steve Mackay rejoining the lineup. Pop opened Madonna’s Reinvention World Tour in Dublin and Iggy and The Stooges played the Glastonbury Festival in June 2007 Playing classics such as “No Fun and “I Wanna Be Your Dog.”

In 2008 Pop appeared at Madonna’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York. Together with The Stooges he sang raucous versions of two Madonna hits, “Burning Up” and “Ray of Light.” Pop also sang on the “No Fun” cover by Asian Dub Foundation on their 2008 album Punkara. Sadly On January 6, 2009, original Stooges guitarist and Pop’s self-described best friend Ron Asheton was found dead from an apparent heart attack. He was 60 years old In 2009 James Williamson rejoined the band after 29 years. In 2009 it was finally announced that The Stooges would be inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010. In 2005, Pop appeared, along with Madonna, Little Richard, Bootsy Collins, and The Roots’ Questlove, in an American TV commercial and in 2006 Iggy and the Stooges played in Australia and New Zealand for the Big Day Out. Iggy Pop released his next album The Weirdness, in 2007. In 2006 Iggy and the Stooges performed at the Lowlands pop festival in the Netherlands, Hodokvas in Slovakia and in the Sziget Festival in Budapest. Author Paul Trynka completed a biography of Pop (with his blessing) called Open Up and Bleed, published 2007. Iggy and the Stooges played at Bam Margera’s wedding and Pop appeared on the single “Punkrocker” with the Teddybears in a Cadillac television commercial. Pop was also the voice of Lil’ Rummy on the Comedy Central cartoon Lil’ Bush and voiced characters on American Dad! The conputer game Grand Theft Auto IV, also includes The Stooges song “I Wanna Be Your Dog”. In 2008 Pop guested on Profanation (Preparation for a Coming Darkness), the new album by the Bill Laswell-helmed group Praxis. Pop collaborated with Danger Mouse and Sparklehorse on the album “Dark Night of the Soul”, singing the track “Pain.” In 2009 Pop released his fifteenth solo album, Préliminaires, Inspired by a novel by French author Michel Houellebecq called La Possibilité d’une île (The Possibility of an Island).

Pop was approached to provide the soundtrack for a film on Houellebcq. He describes this new release as a “quieter album with some jazz overtones”, the first single off the album, “King of the Dogs”, bearing a sound strongly influenced by New Orleans jazz musicians such as Louis Armstrong and Jelly Roll Morton. Pop said that the song was his response to being “sick of listening to idiot thugs with guitars banging out crappy music”. The album is available on legal download sites, CD, and a Deluxe Boxset is available at only 6000 units worldwide. This box set contains the Préliminaires album, a collector “Les Feuilles Mortes” b/w “King Of The Dogs” 7 inch, the cover of which is Pop’s portrait by Marjane Satrapi, and a 38-page booklet of drawings also by Marjane Satrapi. Pop also sings on “We’re All Gonna Die” on Slash’s first solo album Slash, and also appears as a character in the video game Lego Rock Band to sing his song “The Passenger”.

Following a stage diving accident in 2010 Pop claimed he would no longer stage dive. However, he did so at a concert in Madrid, Spain at the Hammersmith Apollo and Zottegem, Belgium. In 2010. Pop appeared at Yonge and Dundas Square in Toronto with the reformed Stooges on the NXNE main stage and also teamed up with The Lilies, a collaboration between Sergio Dias of Os Mutantes and French group Tahiti Boy & The Palmtree Family, to record the single “Why?” In 2011, Pop performed “Real Wild Child” on the tenth season of American Idol; the Los Angeles Times music blog “Pop & Hiss” He is also featured on Kesha’s song “Dirty Love” on her second album Warrior. In 2013, Iggy and the Stooges co-headlined RiotFest 2013 along with The Replacements. In 2014, Pop gave the fourth annual BBC Music John Peel Lecture in Salford, on the topic of “Free Music in a Capitalist Society”. Pop contributed the theme song to Alex Cox’s latest film, Bill, the Galactic Hero and collaborated with New Order on the song “Stray Dog” of their album Music Complete and also with Tomoyasu Hotei on the songs “How The Cookie Crumbles” and “Walking Through The Night” from the album Strangers. In 2016, Pop released a double live album with Josh Homme titled Post Pop Depression: Live At The Royal Albert Hall and in 2017, Iggy Pop performed the song “T.V. Eye” with Metallica on their Hardwired Tour in Mexico City, Mexico.

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Alistair Maclean

Scottish novelist Alistair Stuart MacLean (Scottish Gaelic: Alasdair MacGill-Eain; was born 21 April 1922. He wrote many popular thrillers and adventure stories, the best known being The Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra, and Where Eagles Dare. He also wrote two novels under the pseudonym Ian Stuart. MacLean was born in Glasgow but spent much of his childhood and youth in Daviot, ten miles south of Inverness. He was the third of four sons.

He joined the Royal Navy in 1941, serving in World War II with the ranks of Ordinary Seaman, Able Seaman, and Leading Torpedo Operator. He was first assigned to PS Bournemouth Queen, a converted excursion ship fitted for anti-aircraft guns, on duty off the coasts of England and Scotland. Beginning in 1943, he served on HMS Royalist, a Dido-class light cruiser. There he saw action in 1943 in the Atlantic theatre, on two Arctic convoys and escorting carrier groups in operations against Tirpitz and other targets off the Norwegian coast. In 1944 he and the ship served in the Mediterranean theatre, as part of the invasion of southern France and in helping to sink blockade runners off Crete and bombard Milos in the Aegean. During this time MacLean may have been injured in a gunnery practice accident.In 1945, in the Far East theatre, MacLean and Royalist saw action escorting carrier groups in operations against Japanese targets in Burma, Malaya, and Sumatra. (MacLean’s late-in-life claims that he was captured by the Japanese and tortured have been dismissed by both his son and his biographer as drunken ravings. After the Japanese surrender, Royalist helped evacuate liberated POWs from Changi Prison in Singapore.

MacLean was released from the Royal Navy in 1946. He then studied English at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1953, and then worked as a school teacher in Rutherglen. While a university student, MacLean began writing short stories for extra income, winning a competition in 1954 with the maritime story “Dileas”. The publishing company Collins asked him for a novel and he responded with HMS Ulysses, based on his own war experiences, as well as credited insight from his brother Ian, a Master Mariner. The novel was a great success and MacLean was soon able to devote himself entirely to writing war stories, spy stories and other adventures.

In the early 1960s, MacLean published two novels under the pseudonym “Ian Stuart” in order to prove that the popularity of his books was due to their content rather than his name on the cover. They sold well, but MacLean made no attempt to change his writing style and his fans may easily have recognized him behind the Scottish pseudonym. MacLean’s books eventually sold so well that he moved to Switzerland as a tax exile. From 1963–1966, he took a hiatus from writing to run a hotel business in England.

Sadly though, MacLean’s later books were not as well received as the earlier publications and, in an attempt to keep his stories in keeping with the time, he sometimes lapsed into overly improbable plots. He also struggled constantly with alcoholism, which eventually brought about his death in Munich on 2 February 1987. He is buried a few yards from Richard Burton in Céligny, Switzerland. He was married twice and had two sons by his first wife, as well as an adopted third son.MacLean was awarded a Doctor of Letters by the University of Glasgow in 1983. Many of his novels have also been made into popular and exciting films, including The Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra, and Where Eagles Dare and his novel remain popular.

Mark Twain

American Author Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) sadly passed away April 21 1910. Born November 30, in 1835 he is Most noted for his novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “the Great American Novel.” Mark Twain was born during a visit by Halley’s Comet, and he predicted that he would “go out with it” as well. he grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

At first He apprenticed with a printer. Where He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion’s newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River. He then turned to journalism and while a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well-received. Twain had found his calling.

Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evolved into a chronicler of the vanities, hypocrisies and murderous acts of mankind. At mid-career, with Huckleberry Finn, he combined rich humour, sturdy narrative and social criticism. Twain was a master at rendering colloquial speech which helped to create and popularize a distinctive American literature built on American themes and language. Many of Twain’s works have been suppressed at times for various reasons. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has repeatedly been restricted in American high schools, for its frequent use of words now considered racist which were in common usage in the pre-Civil War period in which the novel was set. Although He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker, with his wit and satire earning him praise from presidents, artists, industrialists, European royalty, critics and peers alike, he lacked financial acumen, and although he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he squandered it on various ventures,and was often forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain’s first important work, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” was first published in the New York Saturday Press on November 18, 1865. Next, he was commissioned to write letters about his travel experiences, chronicling his experiences with his burlesque humour. The first journey he took was to ride the steamer Ajax in its maiden voyage to Hawaii. These humorous letters proved the genesis to his work with the San Francisco Alta California newspaper, which designated him a traveling correspondent for a trip from San Francisco to New York City via the Panama isthmus. This trip resulted in The Innocents Abroad or The New Pilgrims’ Progress. This is a record of a pleasure trip, written as If it were a record of a solemn scientific expedition having the gravity, profundity, and impressive incomprehensibility which are so proper to works of that kind.

In 1872, Twain published a second piece of travel literature, Roughing It, as a semi-sequel to Innocents. This was a semi-autobiographical account of Twain’s journey to Nevada and his subsequent life in the American West. The book lampoons American and Western society in the same way that Innocents critiqued the various countries of Europe and the Middle East. Twain’s next work. Entitled The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today was not a travel piece, as his previous two books had been, it focused more on the events of the day in American society, and was his first attempt at writing a novel. The book is also notable because it is Twain’s only collaboration; it was written with his neighbor Charles Dudley Warner. Twain’s next two works drew on his experiences on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi, was a series of sketches published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875, which featured Twain’s disillusionment with Romanticism. It eventually became the starting point for Life on the Mississippi.

Twain’s next major publication was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which drew on his youth in Hannibal. Modelled on Twain as a child, with traces of two schoolmates, John Briggs and Will Bowen. The book also introduced Huckleberry Finn, based on Twain’s boyhood friend Tom Blankenship. His next book, The Prince and the Pauper, was not as well received. It Tells the story of two boys born on the same day who are physically identical, who switch places. Pauper was Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction, and blame for its shortcomings is usually put on Twain for having not been experienced enough in English society, and also on the fact that it was produced after a massive hit. Twain’s next major published work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, solidified him as a noteworthy American writer. Some have called it the first Great American Novel, and the book has become required reading in many schools throughout the United States. Huckleberry Finn was an offshoot from Tom Sawyer and had a more serious tone than its predecessor. The main premise behind Huckleberry Finn is the young boy’s belief in the right thing to do, even though most believed that it was wrong.

Near the completion of Huckleberry Finn, Twain wrote Life on the Mississippi, this recounts Twain’s memories and new experiences after a 22-year absence from the Mississippi. Twain’s last work was his autobiography, which he dictated and thought would be most entertaining if he went off on whims and tangents in non-chronological order. Some archivists and compilers have rearranged the biography into more conventional forms, thereby eliminating some of Twain’s humour and the flow of the book. The continuing popularity of Mark Twain’s novels has helped him become one of very few authors publishing new best-selling volumes in all 3 of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries

HM Queen Elizabeth II

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was born 21st April 1926. She is the constitutional monarch of 16 sovereign states known as the Commonwealth realms, and head of the 54-member Commonwealth of Nations. In her specific role as the monarch of the UnitedKingdom, one of her 16 realms, she is also Supreme Governor of the Church of England. Elizabeth was born in London, and educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne as George VI in 1936 on the abdication of his brother Edward VIII and She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, and also served in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. On the death of her father in 1952, she became Head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka). Her coronation service in 1953 was the first to be televised. Between 1956 and 1992, many territories gained independence or became republics. Today, Elizabeth is Queen of Jamaica,Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis. In 1947 she married Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, with whom she has four children: Charles, Anne, Andrew, and Edward. and Her reign of 60 years is the second-longest for a British monarch; only Queen Victoria has reigned longer. Her Silver and Golden Jubilees were celebrated in 1977 and 2002; her Diamond Jubilee was celebrated 2012.

Elizabeth was the first child of Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), and his wife, Elizabeth. Her father was the second son of King George V and Queen Mary, and her mother was the youngest daughter of Scottish aristocrat Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. Elizabeth’s only sibling was Princess Margaret, born in 1930. As a granddaughter of the monarch in the male line, Elizabeth’s full style at birth was Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth of York. She was third in the line of succession to the throne, behind her uncle, Edward, Prince of Wales, and her father. In 1936, when her grandfather, George V, died and her uncle Edward succeeded, she became second in line to the throne after her father. Later that year, Edward abdicated after his proposed marriage to divorced socialite Wallis Simpson provoked a constitutional crisis. Elizabeth’s father became king, and she became heiress presumptive, with the style Her Royal Highness The Princess Elizabeth. In 1943, at the age of 16, Elizabeth undertook her first solo public appearance on a visit to the Grenadier Guards, of which she had been appointed Colonel-in-Chief the previous year. As she approached her 18th birthday, the law was changed so that she could act as one of five Counsellors of State in the event of her father’s incapacity or absence abroad,

At the end of World war II in Europe, on Victory in Europe Day, Elizabeth and her sister mingled anonymously with the celebratory crowds in the streets of London. She later said in a rare interview, “we asked my parents if we could go out and see for ourselves. I remember we were terrified of being recognised … I remember lines of unknown people linking arms and walking down Whitehall, all of us just swept along on a tide of happiness and relief.”Two years later, the princess made her first overseas tour, when she accompanied her parents through southern Africa. During the tour, in a broadcast to the British Commonwealth on her 21st birthday, she pledged: “I declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong.”

Elizabeth met her future husband, Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, in 1934 and 1937. After another meeting at the Royal Naval College in Dartmouth in July 1939, Elizabeth – though only 13 years old – fell in love with Philip, and they began to exchange letters.They married on 20 November 1947 at Westminster Abbey. They are second cousins once removed through King Christian IX of Denmark and third cousins through Queen Victoria. Before the marriage, Philip renounced his Greek and Danish titles, converted from Greek Orthodoxy to Anglicanism, and adopted the style Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, taking the surname of his mother’s British family. Just before the wedding, he was created Duke of Edinburgh and granted the style of His Royal Highness. Elizabeth gave birth to her first child, Prince Charles, on 14 November 1948, A second child, Princess Anne, was born in 1950, Princes Andrew was born in in 1959 and Edward in 1963.

Durind 1952 her Father King George VI’s health unfortunately declined, and Elizabeth was soon frequently standing in for him at public events. In October of that year, she toured Canada, and visited President Truman in Washington, D.C. And on the trip, her private secretary, Martin Charteris, carried a draft accession declaration for use if the King died while she was on tour. In early 1952, Elizabeth and Philip set out for a tour of Australia and New Zealand by way of Kenya. On 6 February 1952, they had just returned to their Kenyan home, Sagana Lodge, after a night spent at Treetops Hotel, when word arrived of the death of Elizabeth’s father. Philip broke the news to the new queen. Martin Charteris asked her to choose a regal name; she chose to remain Elizabeth, “of course”. She was proclaimed queen throughout her realms, and the royal party hastily returned to the United Kingdom. She and the Duke of Edinburgh moved into Buckingham Palace.With Elizabeth’s accession it seemed likely that the royal house would bear her husband’s name. Lord Mountbatten thought it would be the House of Mountbatten, as Elizabeth would typically have taken Philip’s last name on marriage; however Elizabeth’s grandmother Queen Mary and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill favoured the retention of the House of Windsor, and so Windsor it remained.

Despite the death of Queen Mary ten weeks before, the coronation went ahead on 2 June 1953. Before she died, Mary had asked that the coronation not be delayed. The ceremony in Westminster Abbey, except the anointing and communion, was televised for the first time, and the coverage was instrumental in boosting the medium’s popularity; the number of television licences in the United Kingdom doubled to 3 million. Elizabeth’s pregnancies with Princes Andrew and Edward in 1959 and 1963, respectively, mark the only times she has not performed the State Opening of the British parliament during her reign. In addition to performing traditional ceremonies, she also instituted new practices such as the Royal Walkabout.

Her first royal walkabout, meeting ordinary members of the public, took place during a tour of Australia and New Zealand in 1970. In 1977, Elizabeth marked the Silver Jubilee of her accession. Many street parties and other events were held to mark the occasion (I used to have a commemorative mug) Many of which coincided with the Queens Associated National and Commonwealth tours and These celebrations re-affirmed the Queen’s ongoing popularity She again undertook an extensive tour of her realms, which began in Jamaica in February, As in 1977, there were many street parties and commemorative events, and monuments bult to honour the occasion. A million people attended each day of the three-day main Jubilee celebration in London, and the enthusiasm shown by the public for Elizabeth again re-affirmed her ongoing popularity.

In 2002, Elizabeth marked her Golden Jubilee as queen. Sadly though both Her sister Princess Margaret and mother died in February and March 2002. On 20 March 2008 the Queen also attended the first Maundy service held outside of England and Wales -t the Church of Ireland St Patrick’s Cathedral, Armagh, at the invitation of Irish President Mary McAleese, in May 2011 the Queen made the first state visit to the Republic of Ireland by a British monarch. Elizabeth addressed the United Nations for a second time in 2010, again in her capacity as queen of all her realms and Head of the Commonwealth. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon introduced her as “an anchor for ourage”. During her visit to New York, which followed a tour of Canada, she officially opened a memorial garden n remembrance of the British victims who pershed durng the September 11th attacks on The World Trade Centre.

The Queen visited Australia again in October 2011, her 16th visit since 1954. In 2012 HM Queen Elizabeth celebrated her Diamond Jubilee, marking 60 years as Queen. She is the longest-lived and second-longest-reigning monarch of the United Kingdom, and the second-longest-serving current head of state (after King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand). She does not intend to abdicate, though the proportion of public duties performed by Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall or Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge may increase as Elizabeth reduces her commitments. She also opened the 2012 Summer Olympics on 27 July 2012 and the Paralympics on 29 August in London.

During her life Queen Elizabeth has held many titles and has witnessed the ongoing transformation of the British Empire into the Commonwealth of Nations. She became the first reigning monarch of Australia and New Zealand to visit those nations. During the tour, crowds were immense; three-quarters of the population of Australia were estimated to have seen the Queen. Since then and Throughout her reign, Elizabeth has undertaken state visits to foreign countries, and tours of Commonwealth ones. She is the most widely travelled head of state in history. She has also received many honours and awards from around the world during her reign, and has held honorary military positions throughout the Commonwealth.

Charlotte Bronte

English novelist and poet Charlotte Brontë was born 21 April 1816 in Thornton, Yorkshire in 1816, the third of six children. In August 1824, Charlotte was sent with three of her sisters, Emily, Maria, and Elizabeth, to the Clergy Daughters’ School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire (Charlotte later used the school as the basis for the fictional Lowood School in Jane Eyre). She and the other surviving children — Branwell, Emily, and Anne – created their own literary fictional worlds, and began chronicling the lives and struggles of the inhabitants of these imaginary kingdoms. Charlotte and Branwell wrote Byronic stories about their imagined country (“Angria”) and Emily and Anne wrote articles and poems about theirs (“Gondal”). The sagas which they created were elaborate and convoluted (and still exist in partial manuscripts) and provided them with an obsessive interest during childhood and early adolescence, which prepared them for their literary vocations in adulthood.

Charlotte continued her education at Roe Head, Mirfield, from 1831 to 32, where she met her lifelong friends and correspondents, Ellen Nussey and Mary Taylor. During this period, she wrote her novella The Green Dwarf (1833) under the name of Wellesley. Charlotte returned to Roe Head as a teacher from 1835 to 1838. In 1839, she took up the first of many positions as governess to various families in Yorkshire. In 1842 Charlotte and Emily travelled to Brussels to enroll in a boarding school run by Constantin Heger In return for board and tuition, Charlotte taught English and Emily taught music. However Their time at the boarding school was cut short when Elizabeth Branwell, their aunt, who joined the family after their mother died, Charlotte returned alone to Brussels in January 1843 to take up a teaching post at the boarding school, but returned to Haworth in January 1844. She later used her time at the boarding school as the inspiration for some experiences in The Professor and Villette

In May 1846, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne self-financed the publication of a joint collection of poetry under the assumed names of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell. Charlotte’s first manuscript, called The Professor, remained unpublished, although she was heartened by an encouraging response she received from Smith, Elder & Co of Cornhill, who expressed an interest in any longer works which “Currer Bell” might wish to send. Charlotte responded by finishing and sending a second manuscript in August 1847, and six weeks later this second manuscript (titled Jane Eyre: An Autobiography) was published. Jane Eyre was a success, and initially received favourable reviews. It was followed by the subsequent publication of the first novels by Charlotte’s sisters: Emily’s Wuthering Heights and Anne’s Agnes Grey. In June 1854, Charlotte married Arthur Bell Nicholls, her father’s curate and, in the opinion of many scholars, the model for several of her literary characters such as Jane Eyre’s Edward Rochester and St. John Rivers. She became pregnant soon after the marriage. Her health declined rapidly during this time, and according to Gaskell, her earliest biographer, she was attacked by “sensations of perpetual nausea and ever-recurring faintness.”

Sadly though Charlotte died, along with her unborn child, on 31 March 1855, at the young age of 38. Her death certificate gives the cause of death as phthisis (tuberculosis), but many biographers suggest she may have died from dehydration and malnourishment, caused by excessive vomiting from severe morning sickness or hyperemesis gravidarum. There is also evidence to suggest that Charlotte died from typhus she may have caught from Tabitha Ackroyd, the Bronte household’s oldest servant, who died shortly before her. Charlotte was interred in the family vault in The Church of St. Michael and All Angels, Haworth, West Yorkshire, England. Her endurng popularty & legacy stll lives on To this day and all Charlotte Bronte’s novels Particularly Jane Eyre, are still as popular as ever. There have also been many Television Radio and Film adaptations of her novels and her classic novel’s are still widely taught in schools.

Prince

Prolific American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and actor Prince Rogers Nelson Sadly died at his Paisley Park recording studio and home in Chanhassen, Minnesota, near Minneapolis, on April 21, 2016 after suffering flu-like symptoms for several weeks. He was Born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and his family ancestry is centered in Louisiana, Prince’s father was a pianist and songwriter and his mother was a jazz singer. Prince was named after his father, whose stage name was Prince Rogers, and who performed with a jazz group called the Prince Rogers Trio. Prince developed a keen interest in music, and this was encouraged by his Father Prince wrote his first tune, “Funk Machine”, on his father’s piano when he was seven. When Prince was ten years old, his parents separated. Prince constantly switched homes he befriended Andre Anderson, who later became known as André Cymone. Prince and Anderson joined Prince’s cousin Charles Smith in a band called Grand Central while they were attending Minneapolis’s Central High School. Smith was later replaced by Morris Day on the drums. Prince played piano and guitar for the band, which performed at clubs and parties in the Minneapolis area. Grand Central later changed its name to Champagne and started playing original music influenced by Sly and the Family Stone, James Brown, Earth, Wind & Fire, Miles Davis, George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic, Carlos Santana, Jimi Hendrix, and Todd Rundgren. Prince also played basketball in high school, and continued to play it for recreation as an adult.

In 1975, Pepe Willie, the husband of Prince’s cousin, Shauntel, formed the band 94 East with Marcy Ingvoldstad and Kristie Lazenberry. Willie hired André Cymone and Prince to record tracks with 94 East. Those songs were written by Willie and Prince contributed guitar tracks. Prince also co-wrote, with Willie, the 94 East song, “Just Another Sucker”. The band recorded tracks which later became the album Minneapolis Genius – The Historic 1977 Recordings. Prince also recorded, but never released, a song written by Willie, “If You See Me” (also known as, “Do Yourself a Favor”). In 1976, Prince created a demo tape with producer Chris Moon in Moon’s Minneapolis studio. Subsequently Owen Husney, a Minneapolis businessman signed Prince, at the age of 17, to a management contract and helped Prince create a demo recording at Sound 80 Studios in Minneapolis using producer/engineer David Z.

In 1978 after recording songs with his cousin’s band 94 East, 19-year-old Prince recorded several unsuccessful demo tapes before releasing his debut album For You. His 1979 album Prince went platinum due to the success of the singles “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover”, Prince signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. who agreed to give Prince creative control for three albums and ownership of the publishing rights. Prince’s first album, For You, was released in 1978 and included the songs “Soft and Wet” and “Just as Long as We’re Together”. In 1979, Prince created a band that included André Cymone on bass, Dez Dickerson on guitar, Gayle Chapman and Doctor Fink on keyboards, and Bobby Z. on drums. In October 1979, Prince released a self-titled album, Prince, which contained two R&B hits: “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover”. In 1980, Prince released the album, Dirty Mind, which featured the song”Uptown”,”Head”, “Sister” and “Partyup”. In October 1981, Prince released the album, Controversy and his next album 1999 (1982) incorporated Prince’s trademark of prominently sexual lyrics and incorporation of elements of funk, dance, and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as The Revolution and released Purple Rain, which served as the soundtrack to his film debut of the same name.Prince also started using abbreviated spelling, such as spelling the words you as U, to as 2, and for as 4, as indicated by the inclusion of the tracks “Jack U Off” and 1999’s Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic, which featured ‘Hot Wit U.’

In 1981, Prince formed a side project band called the Time. The band released four albums between 1981 and 1990, with Prince writing and performing most of the instrumentation and backing vocals. In late 1982, Prince released a double album, 1999, Which contained the songs 1999, Little Red Corvette” and “Delirious” followed by the albums Around the World in a Day (1985) and Parade (1986). After this The Revolution disbanded and Prince released the critically acclaimed double album Sign “O” the Times (1987) as a solo artist. He released three more solo albums before debuting The New Power Generation band in 1991. He changed his stage name in 1993 to an unpronounceable symbol also known as the “Love Symbol” However In 2000, he began referring to himself as “Prince” again. Since then He has released 15 albums, including Plectrum Electrum, 20ten, Art Official Age, HITnRUN Phase One, and HITnRUN phase two. Prince was renowned as an innovator and was widely known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, and wide vocal range. He was widely regarded as the pioneer of Minneapolis sound. His music combined rock, R&B, soul, funk, hip hop, disco, psychedelia, jazz, and pop. He sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. He won seven Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, an Academy Award. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004. Rolling Stone has ranked Prince at number 27 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.