The tale of Beren and Luthien

The Tale of Beren and Lúthien by J.R.R. Tolkien is being released 1 June 2017. It is the epic story of the love and adventures of the mortal Man Beren and the immortal Elf-maiden Lúthien and is set during the First Age of Middle-earth, about 6500 years before the events of The Lord of the Rings.

It features the warrior Beren, the last survivor of a group of Men led by his father Barahir who fought Morgoth, the Dark Enemy, during the Battle of Sudden Flame, But were defeated allowing Morgoth to conquer much of northern Middle-earth. After this defeat Beren flees into the elvish realm Doriath Where he meets Lúthien, the only daughter of King Thingol and Melian the Maia. Beren and Lúthien gradually fall in love, However Thingol doesn’t think Beren is worthy enough to marry his daughter. So to keep them apart Thingol sets Beren a seemingly impossible task to achieve before marrying Lúthien and asks him to bring him one of the Silmarils, the three hallowed jewels made by the Elf Fëanor, which Morgoth had stolen from the elves.

So Beren leaves Doriath and sets out on his quest to Angband, the enemy’s fortress. Despite Thingol’s best efforts nd  later followed him. On his journey to the enemy’s land Beren reached Nargothrond, an Elvish stronghold, where he is joined by ten warriors under the lead of King Finrod, who had sworn an oath of friendship to Beren’s father. However Fëanor’s sons, Celegorm and Curufin are not happy about this turn of events. The company accompanies Beren but are captured by servants of Sauron, despite the best efforts of Finrod to maintain their guise as Orcs, and imprisoned in Tol-in-Gaurhoth. One by one they are killed by a werewolf until only Beren and Finrod remain. Unfortunately, Lúthien is also captured and brought to Nargothrond by Celegorm and Curufin. However Aided by Huan, Celegorm’s hound, she escapes.

Beren and Lúthien eventually reach Morgoth’s fortress stronghold of Angband and set about retrieving the Silmarils from Morgoth’s crown. However they are confronted by Morgoth and Carcaroth a giant werewolf, who was bred as an opponent to Huan, who bites off Beren’s hand. Beren and Lúthien manage to escape to Doriath. Unfortunately though Carcharoth, chases them and causes a great deal of carnage, death and destruction. So Beren and Huan set off to stop Carcaroth and recover the Silmaril.

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Simon Gallup (The Cure)

English musician and bassist of the post-punk band The Cure Simon Gallup was born 1 June 1960 in Duxhurst, Surrey. After moving to Horley, Surrey in 1961 he attended Horley Infants and Junior Schools between 1961 and 1971, followed by Horley Balcombe Road Comprehensive from 1971-1976. Between 1976 and 1978 he worked in a plastics factory and became the bass player for local punk band Lockjaw, who later evolved into The Magazine Spies (1979–1980), also known as The Mag/Spys.[1] Lockjaw and The Mag/Spys played regular live shows with Easy Cure and later The Cure between 1977 and 1979, and after collaborating in the studio on the Cult Hero recording sessions in October 1979, both Gallup and keyboardist Matthieu Hartley left The Mag/Spys to join The Cure. Former Mag/Spys Gallup, Hartley and Stuart Curran later performed together under the name of The Cry and later Fools Dance during Gallup’s hiatus from The Cure between 1982 and 1984.

Gallup joined The Cure in 1979, replacing Michael Dempsey on bass guitar and first performed on The Cure albums that make up “The Dark Trilogy”: Seventeen Seconds, Faith, and Pornography. He also has been credited for occasionally playing the keyboards, particularly after Matthieu Hartley’s departure in 1980. He took over keyboard for many of the songs that Hartley played. Examples of songs he played keyboard on live include “At Night”, “A Forest”, “A Strange Day” and “Pornography”. During “Cold” he multi-tasked playing bass guitar and bass pedals. On the Swing Tour in 1996, he played twelve-string acoustic guitar on “This is a Lie”. On the Dream Tour in 2000 he played a Fender Bass VI on “There Is No If”

During the Pornography Tour in 1982, a series of incidents prompted Gallup to leave The Cure, including an incident on 27 May 1982 after a live performance at Hall Tivoli, Strasbourg, France when he got into a fist fight with Robert Smith at a nightclub in Strasbourg reportedly over a bar tab. Robert, said that “I was on the first floor of this club when they came up and told me there was a problem downstairs. Simon was so wound up that no-one could talk to him – he was screaming at the barman, this young kid who was nearly in tears. By himself, Simon would have never behaved like that but he was surrounded by the road crew so he was behaving the way he thought a rock and roller ought to behave. He didn’t want to pay for his drinks because he thought I wasn’t paying for mine. I told him to shut up and he punched me. It was the first time he really laid into me, we had an enormous ruck and I said ‘That’s it’, walked out, got a cab back to the hotel, got my suitcase, my passport from the tour manager’s room and got on the first flight to London. That was at 6.30 am and I was home by half past 10. I left a note saying I wasn’t coming back. Simon returned the same afternoon. I’d left so I suppose he thought he could do the same. Good idea … we had three days off!”.

Gallup and the rest of The Cure completed their Fourteen Explicit Moments Tour in support of Pornography, with a 1982 live performance at Ancienne Belgique, Brussels, Belgium singing an improvised song, “The Cure Is Dead”, with Gary Biddles singing abuse about Smith and Tolhurst. Smith, on drums, then threw his drumsticks at Biddles, and they stormed off stage. Tolhurst played bass guitar and Gallup played rhythm guitar during this last concert. A second incident, occurred weeks after the first incident, and resulted in Gallup leaving The Cure to form Fools Dance with Biddles. Initially, at this concert, The Cure decided to play “Forever”, with instrument changes; Gallup played guitar, Tolhurst played bass, Smith played the drums, and Biddles, a part-time roadie and friend of four Gallup’s, doing vocals. As soon as he got on stage, Biddles started singing insulting abuse about the other members.

Gallup left the band and started The Cry with Gary Biddles and Matthieu Hartley. Their first gig was at the Covent Garden Rock Garden on 19 April 1983. They later changed their name to Fools Dance, which released two EPs; Fools Dance and They’ll Never Know. Biddles sang most of the songs that were released by this band, Gallup sang on one called “The Ring”. When asked why he left The Cure, he said, “It’s just basically that Robert and I are both really arrogant bastards, and it got to such an extreme. I suppose you just can’t have two egocentrics in a band, and Robert was sort of ‘the main man’.”

In 1984, Smith asked Gallup to return to The Cure, an offer which he accepted. Since then, the two of them have remained on good terms. Gallup also served as best man at Smith’s wedding in 1988. In late 1992, Gallup again took a brief break from the band during the Wish Tour after he had to be transported to hospital, suffering from pleurisy after being ill for several months. During this time, he was replaced on bass by former Associates and Shelleyan Orphan member Roberto Soave. Gallup is the second-longest-serving member of The Cure, which has led to him being referred to as Robert Smith’s right-hand man. He performed on every album except Three Imaginary Boys, Boys Don’t Cry, Japanese Whispers, The Top, and Concert.

Ronnie Wood (Rolling Stones, The Faces, Jeff Beck)

English rock guitarist and bassist Ronnie Wood was born 1 June 1947. He is best known as a former member of The Jeff Beck Group, Faces, and a member of The Rolling Stones since 1975. He also plays lap and pedal steel guitar. Wood began his career in 1964, when he joined The Byrds on guitar. He then joined the mod group The Creation, but only remained with the group for a short time, and appeared on a small number of singles. Wood then joined The Jeff Beck Group in 1967. They released two albums, Truth and Beck-Ola, which became moderate successes. The group split in 1969, and Wood departed along with lead vocalist Rod Stewart to join former Small Faces members Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan, and Kenney Jones in a new group, dubbed the Faces.

The group, although relegated to “cult” status in the US, found great success in the UK and mainland Europe. The Faces released their debut album, First Step, in 1970. The group went on to release Long Player and A Nod Is as Good as a Wink… to a Blind Horse in 1971. Their last LP, entitled Ooh La La, was released in 1973. After the group split, Wood began several solo projects, eventually recording his first solo LP, I’ve Got My Own Album to Do, in 1974. The album featured former bandmate McLagan as well as former Beatle George Harrison and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones,Keith Richards was a longtime friend of Wood’s and soon invited Wood to join The Rolling Stones, after the departure of Mick Taylor. Wood joined in 1975, and has remained a member ever since.

The Rolling Stone were formed in London in 1962 When Keith Richards and Mick Jagger who were childhood friends and classmates, discovered that they shared a common intereest in the music of Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters. leading to the formation of a band with Dick Taylor (later of Pretty Things). Richards, Taylor, and Jagger found Brian Jones as he sat in playing slide guitar with Alexis Korner’s R&B band, Blues Incorporated,which also had two other future members of the Rolling Stones: Ian Stewart and Charlie Watts On 12 July 1962 the band played their first gig at the Marquee Club billed as “The Rollin’ Stones”.

The line-up was Jagger, Richards and Jones, along with Stewart on piano, and Mick Taylor on bass. Bassist Bill Wyman joined in December 1962 and drummer Charlie Watts the following January 1963 to form the band’s long-standing rhythm section. Their first single, was a cover of Chuck Berry’s “Come On” and their second single, was “I Wanna Be Your Man”, Their third single, Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away”. The band’s second UK LP – The Rolling Stones No. 2, yielded the singles “The Last Time”, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Get Off of My Cloud”. The third album “Aftermath” was released in 1966, contained the singles “Paint It Black”, the ballad “Lady Jane” “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow?” “Goin’ Home” and “Under My Thumb”. 1967 saw the release of “Between the Buttons”, which included the double A-side single “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Ruby Tuesday”, and the release of the Satanic Majesties Request LP. the next album, Beggars Banquet was an eclectic mix of country and blues-inspired tunes,featuring the singles “Street Fighting Man” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “Sympathy for the Devil. The Stones next album Let It Bleed featured the song “Gimmie Shelter”, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” “Midnight Rambler” and “Love in Vain”. The next album Sticky Finger was released in 1971 and featured an elaborate cover design by Andy Warhol, and contains the hits, “Brown Sugar”, and “Wild Horses”.

The Stones classic double album, Exile on Main Street. was released in May 1972. their follow-up album Goats Head Soup, featured the hit “Angie”. Their next albums included 1974′s It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll and Some Girls, which included the hit single “Miss You”, the country ballad “Far Away Eyes”, “Beast of Burden”, and “Shattered”. The band released their next albums Emotional Rescue and Tattoo You in 1980 which featured the single “Start Me Up”. In 1982 the Rolling Stones toured Europe to commemorate their 20th anniversary and released their next album Undercover in late 1983. In 1986′s the album Dirty Work was released,which contained the song “Harlem Shuffle”.The next album “Steel Wheels” included the singles “Mixed Emotions”, “Rock and a Hard Place”, “Almost Hear You Sigh” and “Continental Drift”. their next studio album 1994′s Voodoo Lounge,went double platinum in the US. and won a 1995 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album. The Rolling Stones ended the 1990s with the album Bridges to Babylon which was released in 1997

In 2002, the band released Forty Licks, a greatest hits double album, to mark their forty years as a band and ten years later In 2012 The Rolling Stones released the album Grrrr to celebrate their 50th anniversary featuring two new tracks and also made a documentary called Crossfire Hurricane. The Rolling Stones are one of the of the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed acts in the history of popular music and In early 1989, the Rolling Stones, including Mick Taylor, Ronnie Wood and Ian Stewart (posthumously), were inducted into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Q magazine also named them one of the “50 Bands To See Before You Die”, and popular consensus has accorded them the title of the “World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band.” Rolling Stone magazine ranked them 4th on their “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list.

Focke Wulf FW190

The maiden flight of the German Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighter-bomber airplane took place 1 June 1939. The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger (English: Shrike) is a German single-seat, single-engine fighter aircraft designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s and widely used during World War II. Along with its well-known counterpart, the Messerschmitt Bf 109, the Focke-Wulf 190 Würger became the backbone of the Luftwaffe’s Jagdwaffe (Fighter Force). The twin-row BMW 801 radial engine that powered most operational versions enabled the Fw 190 to lift larger loads than the Bf 109, allowing its use as a day fighter, fighter-bomber, ground-attack aircraft and, to a lesser degree, night fighter. The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger was one of the best German planes of all time.

The Fw 190A started flying operationally over France in August 1941, and quickly proved superior in all but turn radius to the Royal Air Force’s main front-line fighter, the Spitfire Mk. V, especially at low and medium altitudes. The 190 maintained superiority over Allied fighters until the introduction of the improved Spitfire Mk. IX. In November/December 1942, the Fw 190 made its air combat debut on the Eastern Front, finding much success in fighter wings and specialised ground attack units called Schlachtgeschwader (Battle Wings or Strike Wings) from October 1943 onwards. In the opinion of German pilots who flew both the Bf 109 and the Fw 190, the latter provided increased firepower and, at low to medium altitude, manoeuvrability.

The Fw 190A series’ performance decreased at high altitudes (usually 6,000 m (20,000 ft) and above), which reduced its effectiveness as a high-altitude interceptor. From the Fw 190’s inception, there had been ongoing efforts to address this with a turbosupercharged BMW 801 in the B model, the much longer-nosed C model with efforts to also turbocharge its chosen Daimler-Benz DB 603 inverted V12 powerplant, and the similarly long-nosed D model with the Junkers Jumo 213. Problems with the turbocharger installations on the -B and -C subtypes meant only the D model would see service, entering service in September 1944. While these “long nose” versions gave them parity with Allied opponents, it arrived far too late in the war to have any real effect. The Fw 190 was well-liked by its pilots. Some of the Luftwaffe’s most successful fighter aces claimed a great many of their kills while flying it, including Otto Kittel, Walter Nowotny and Erich Rudorffer.

Alan Wilder (Depeche Mode)

Alan Wilder, British musician with Electronic Band Depeche Mode was Born 1st June 1959. Depeche Mode were formed in 1980 in Basildon, Essex The group’s original line-up consisted of Dave Gahan (lead vocals), Martin Gore (keyboards, guitar, vocals, chief songwriter after 1981), Andy Fletcher (keyboards) and Vince Clarke (keyboards, chief songwriter 1980–81). Vince Clarke left the band after the release of their 1981 debut album, Speak & Spell, and was replaced by Alan Wilder (keyboards, drums, occasional songwriter) with Gore taking over songwriting. Wilder also left the band in 1995 and since then Gahan, Gore, and Fletcher have continued as a trio.

Following the departure of Vince Clarke, Depeche Mode placed an advertisement in the music magazine Melody Maker: “Keyboard player needed for established band – no timewasters.” Even though the ad was looking for someone under 21 (Wilder was 22) he lied about his age to get the job, and got away with it. He joined Depeche Mode in January 1982, initially as a tour keyboardist, and soon thereafter as a full member of the recording band.Wilder wrote a handful of songs for Depeche Mode, including “The Great Outdoors” (the B-Side to “Get the Balance Right”), “Two Minute Warning” and “The Landscape Is Changing” (and a B-Side, “Fools”) from the album Construction Time Again, and “If You Want” (and a B-Side, “In Your Memory”) from the album Some Great Reward. However, Wilder’s more notable contributions to Depeche Mode were as a musician, arranger, and producer.In addition to playing synthesiser throughout his time with Depeche Mode, Wilder also played piano on the band’s signature ballad “Somebody,” and oboe on the band’s hit anthem, “Everything Counts.” In the documentary film 101, Wilder demonstrates how different synthesiser parts of a song are split and arranged across a sampling keyboard for playing them live during the concert, just one small example of Wilder’s ongoing contributions to Depeche Mode during his time as a member of the group. For the recording of the albumSongs of Faith and Devotion and its corresponding Devotional Tour Wilder learned to play live drums.For “Enjoy the Silence” from the album Violator, Wilder is credited with taking Martin Gore’s melancholy ballad-esque demo and re-envisioning the song as a percolating, melodic dance track. The resulting single went on to become one of the most commercially successful songs in Depeche Mode’s history. Wilder left Depeche Mode On 1 June 1995 (his 36th birthday)

After his split from Depeche Mode, Wilder was approached by Robert Smith with an offer to join The Cure. Wilder respectfully declined. According to Wilder himself, the possibility was offered on behalf of The Cure by Daryl Bamonte (tour manager for both Depeche Mode and The Cure, and brother of The Cure member Perry Bamonte), and he declined as joining another band was the last thing on his mind.He briefly reunited with Depeche Mode during the Teenage Cancer Trust concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London on 17 February 2010, and enjoyed a rapturous reception. During the encore, Wilder accompanied Martin Gore on piano for “Somebody”. Gore returned the favour and played a DJ set on one of Recoil’s Selected Events.In 2011, Wilder provided two mixes for the Depeche Mode track “In Chains”.Recoil began in 1986 as a two-track experimental EP. Simply entitled 1 + 2, this collection of primitive demos caught the attention ofMute Records label boss Daniel Miller and was inconspicuously released as a mini-album on 12″ vinyl. An album, Hydrology, soon followed in 1988 and both were eventually re-issued by Mute on CD as Hydrology plus 1 + 2. These early Recoil recordings revealed Alan’s position as a pioneer in the newly emerging world of sampling technology and demonstrated how he could turn the Depeche Mode sound around to create something entirely new.

Almost immediately, Wilder found himself back in the studio to record what would become the most successful Depeche Mode album to date, Violator. It wasn’t until the band finally allowed themselves an extended break after the enormously successful World Violation Tour that Alan could return to Recoil—not, however, before agreeing to produce Ebbhead, another album for label-mates Nitzer Ebb.It was during this time that he cemented a working relationship with lead singer Douglas McCarthy who would return the favour by singing on Recoil’s next album, Bloodline. For the Bloodline LP, released in 1991, Between 1992–93 Wilder resumed his Depeche Mode duties as the band recorded the album Songs of Faith and Devotion. Released to universal acclaim, it topped the charts in the UK, US, Germany and a host of other countries. Enjoying hits with “I Feel You”, “Walking in My Shoes”, “In Your Room” and “Condemnation”, Depeche Mode embarked on their most adventurous tour to date, enduring a gruelling fifteen months on the road. Although the group had reached the pinnacle of success, aspects of the lifestyle had taken their toll on everyone and things eventually came to a head. In June 1995, having spent fourteen years as an integral part of one of the most popular and influential bands the UK has ever produced, Alan Wilder made the decision to leave Depeche Mode On 1 June 1995 (his 36th birthday) and Free from his group commitments, Wilder could now focus solely on Recoil and In the spring of 2000, Recoil released Liquid. Following a five-year break from recording, Alan Wilder returned with Recoil’s fifth studio album, entitled subHuman released in July 2007

So far Depeche Mode have had more than 48 songs in the UK Singles Chart including “Enjoy the Silence” “Policy of Truth” “Personal Jesus“ “World in My Eyes””Never Let Me Down Again” and “Walking in My Shoes” twelve top 10 albums in the UK charts, two of which debuted at #1. According to EMI, Depeche Mode have sold over 100 million albums and singles worldwide, making them the most successful electronic band in music history. Q magazine calls Depeche Mode “The most popular electronic band the world has ever known” and included the band in the list of the “50 Bands That Changed The World!”. In 2010 Depeche Mode were ranked No. 98 on VH1′s list of the “100 greatest artists of all time”. Martin Gore has also released a solo album called MG. Depeche Modes fourteenth album, Spirit Featuring the song “Where’s the Revolution, was released in 2017 followed by theGlobal Spirit Tour. the group also got a nomination for the 2017 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Marilyn Monroe

American actress, model, and singer Marilyn Monroe, was born 1st June in 1926. She became a major sex symbol, starring in a number of commercially successful motion pictures during the 1950s and early 1960s.Born Norma Jeane Mortenson (soon after changed to Baker), she spent much of her childhood in a succession of foster homes. It was during this time Monroe was told that someday she would become a movie star. Norma Jeane’s Foster Mother Grace was captivated by Jean Harlow, and would let Norma Jeane wear makeup and take her out to get her hair curled. They would go to the movies together, forming the basis for Norma Jeane’s fascination with the cinema and the stars on screen.

During the forties Monroe began a career as a model, which led to a film contract in 1946 with Twentieth Century-Fox. Her early film appearances were minor, but her performances in The Asphalt Jungle and All About Eve (both 1950) drew attention to her. By 1953, Monroe had progressed to a leading role in Niagara (1953), a melodramatic film noir that dwelt on her seductiveness. Her “dumb blonde” persona was used to comic effect in subsequent films such as Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) and The Seven Year Itch (1955).

Limited by typecasting, Monroe studied at the Actors Studio to broaden her range. Her dramatic performance in Bus Stop (1956) was hailed by critics and garnered a Golden Globe nomination. Her production company, Marilyn Monroe Productions, released The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), for which she received a BAFTA Award nomination and won a David di Donatello award. She received a Golden Globe Award for her performance in Some Like It Hot (1959).Monroe’s last completed film was The Misfits, co-starring Clark Gable with screenplay by her then-husband, Arthur Miller. The final years of Monroe’s life were marked by illness, personal problems, and a reputation for unreliability and being difficult to work with. The circumstances of her death, from an overdose of barbiturates, have been the subject of conjecture. Though officially classified as a “probable suicide”, the possibility of an accidental overdose, as well as of homicide, have not been ruled out. In 1999, Monroe was ranked as the sixth greatest female star of all time by the American Film Institute. In the decades following her death, she has often been cited as both a pop and a cultural icon as well as the quintessential American sex symbol.

Mike Joyce (The Smiths)

English Drummer Michael Adrian Paul “Mike” Joyce was born 1 June 1963 in Manchester to Irish Catholic parents. He attended St Gregory’s Grammar School in the city., he had previously drummed for Manchester band The Hoax and Irish punk rock group Victim. Joyce then joined The Smiths alongside vocalist Morrissey, guitarist Johnny Marr, bassist Andy Rourke and Joyce. This provided him with his first taste of success and was a member of The Smiths throughout the band’s existence (1982–87).

Sadly in 1987 the Smiths disbanded and Immediately after the break-up of the band, Joyce and Smiths bassist Andy Rourke played with Sinéad O’Connor. They, along with Craig Gannon, also provided the rhythm section for two singles by Smiths’ singer Morrissey – “Interesting Drug” and “The Last of the Famous International Playboys” and their b-sides. Work with Suede, Buzzcocks, Public Image Limited, Julian Cope, P. P. Arnold and Pete Wylie followed throughout the 1990s. Joyce, Rourke, and Gannon reunited to work on a project with fellow Manchester musician Aziz Ibrahim (formerly of The Stone Roses and Simply Red), ex-Oasis guitarist Bonehead (as Moondog One), and Vinny Peculiar.

The Smiths breakup started in 1996, when Joyce controversially sued former Smiths’ colleagues Johnny Marr and Morrissey for an equal share of performance and recording royalties. Joyce won the case and was awarded damages of around one million pounds from Morrissey and Marr. According to Morrissey, who unsuccessfully appealed Joyce’s claims, Joyce first sued Morrissey and Marr in 1989 for 25% of The Smiths’ recording royalties. In 1996, Joyce won the case “on the basis of the 1890 Partnership Act”. The next year (1997), according to Morrissey, “Joyce was paid £ 215, 000 from me, and 215,000 pounds from Johnny Marr.

In 2001, as a final payment of back royalties, Johnny Marr paid Joyce 260 thousand pounds, plus ‘costs’. At this time I Morrissey was in the US and was not served with court proceedings, so Joyce obtained a Default Judgment. He then put forward a claim from me for 688 thousand pounds – well above and beyond the amount Johnny Marr was ordered to pay. In my absence, the figure was not contested. … Since 2001, and because of the Default Judgment against me, Joyce has taken out Third Party Orders against the following societies: my personal bank account in England, Smiths royalties from Warner Music, my personal PRS royalties, my personal PPL royalties, and he has attempted to seize UK concert fees from venue to venue. This money, to date, totals 700 thousand pounds. This figure is in addition to the figures mentioned above.” Morrissey went on to claim that the Joyce action is continuous. Because of his Default Judgment he continues to take my royalties, and the royalties of others mentioned above, from Warner Music – consequently I have not received record royalties since 2001.”

In July 2007, Joyce, along with former bandmate Andy Rourke released Inside The Smiths, a DVD which chronicled their experiences of being in the band. In October 2007, Joyce toured the UK playing drums for Vinny Peculiar with Bonehead on bass guitar, and in 2008 ran a successful night at The Brickhouse in Manchester called “Alternative Therapy”. In parallel to his music career, he works as a DJ and broadcaster, including occasional appearances on BBC 6 Music. Joyce has also hosted shows on East Village Radio, an internet station.