Bobby Gillespie (Primal Scream)

Bobby Gillespie, Scottish vocalist with Scottish alternative rock band, Primal Scream was born June 22nd 1962. Primal Scream were originally formed in 1982 in Glasgow by Bobby Gillespie (vocals) and Jim Beattie and now based in London. The current lineup consists of Gillespie, Andrew Innes (guitar), Martin Duffy (keyboards), and Darrin Mooney (drums). Barrie Cadogan has toured and recorded with the band since 2006 as a replacement after the departure of guitarist Robert “Throb” Young. Gillespie was originally the drummer of The Jesus and Mary Chain before leaving to form Primal Scream and the band became a key part of the mid-1980s indie pop scene, but eventually moved away from their more jangly sound, taking on more psychedelic and then garage rock influences, before incorporating a dance music element to their sound. Their classic 1991 album Screamadelica was released in late 1991 and broke the band into the mainstream with songs like, “Loaded“, and “Come Together“, “Higher Than The Sun” and “Don’t Fight It, Feel It”, both .The band began work on their fourth album “Give out but Dont Give up” in Roundhouse Studios in London in September 1992.In March 1994, the first single from the new album, “Rocks”, was released. It was the band’s highest charting single to date, reaching number seven on the UK charts.

Two more singles were released from the album, “Jailbird” and “(I’m Gonna) Cry Myself Blind”, both of which charted progressively lower.After a short hiatus, the band returned with a new lineup. Gary “Mani” Mounfield, fresh from the well-publicised break-up of his previous band, The Stone Roses, was added as the band’s new bassist, and Paul Mulraney was added as their new drummer. The arrival of Mani revitalized the group, who were considering disbanding after the failure of Give Out but released a new album Vanishing Point which had a complex shoegazing dance/dub rhythm, harking back to the crossover success of Screamadelica, yet sounding significantly darker. Some songs on the album were inspired by cult 1971 film Vanishing Point; Gillespie said that they wanted to create an alternative soundtrack for the film. Other lyrics were inspired by the band’s past experiences with drug abuse.

Gillespie described the album as “an anarcho-syndicalist speedfreak road movie record!” The first single released from the album, “Kowalski”, was released in May 1997, and reached number 8 on the British charts.the band’s sixth album XTRMNTR had a harsher and angrier musical direction. Many of the songs they wrote had overtly political lyrics, Gillespie said the band wished to convey “what it’s like to be in Britain in this day and age The album featured mulitiple guest appearances, including the Chemical Brothers, New Order’s Bernard Sumner, and former My Bloody Valentine guitarist Kevin Shields, who had become a semi-permanent member. The first single from XTRMNTR, was entitled “Swastika Eyes. their seventh album, Evil Heat, was released in 2002. On the album Kate Moss sang professionally for the first time with single “Some Velvet Morning” and The album also featured another guest appearance, Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant.

In 2003 the double CD album Dirty Hits was released containing the better known works and some previously unheard versions and remixes of those tunes.The next album Riot City Blues was said to contain “euphoric rock ‘n’ roll songs” which was intended to capture the energy of Primal Scream’s live performances.The album’s first single, “Country Girl”, was released on 22 May 2006. The album, Riot City Blues, was released in June and reached number five on the UK Album Charts. the band toured the UK, along with selected dates in Europe in support of the album and also released their first DVD, Riot City Blues Tour, which featured clips of the band’s performance in London, as well as all their music videos and an interview with Gillespie and Mani.

Primal Scream spent most of 2011 touring in support of 20th Anniversary of Screamadelica, on 18 October Mani revealed he had left the band to follow his dream due to the reformation of his original band The Stone Roses And Debbie Googe (of My Bloody Valentine) was announced as his replacement. Primal Scream supported The Stone Roses at their Heaton Park concert in Manchester on 29 June 2012. Primal Scream have also played at Glastonbury Festival and My Bloody Valentine have played at T in the Park numerous times. Primal Scream’s latest album Chaosmosis was released 2016.

Glastonbury 2017

PYRAMID STAGE
FRIDAY

RADIOHEAD
THE XX
ROYAL BLOOD
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON (with Johnny Depp)
FIRST AID KIT
BLOSSOMS
PAUL CARRACK
HACIENDA CLASSICAL

SATURDAY
FOO FIGHTERS
THE NATIONAL
KATY PERRY
RUN THE JEWELS
CRAIG DAVID
JOOLS HOLLAND & HIS RHYTHM & BLUES ORCHESTRA
VIEUX FARKA TOURÉ
THE BOOTLEG BEATLES WITH THE PEPPERLAND SINFONIA

SUNDAY
ED SHEERAN
BIFFY CLYRO
CHIC
BARRY GIBB
LAURA MARLING
JAMIE CULLUM
ORCHESTRA BAOBAB
THE BLACK DYKE BAND

OTHER STAGE
FRIDAY

MAJOR LAZER
LORDE
GEORGE EZRA
HALSEY
GLASS ANIMALS
CIRCA WAVES
NOTHING BUT THIEVES
CHARLI XCX
THE PRETENDERS

SATURDAY
ALT-J
STORMZY
WILEY
TBA
KAISER CHIEFS
WILD BEASTS
BRITISH SEA POWER
WHITNEY
GABRIELLE APLIN

SUNDAY
BOY BETTER KNOW
EMELI SANDE
COURTEENERS
HAIM
KODALINE
RAG’N’BONE MAN
DROPKICK MURPHYS
DEAF HAVANA
SLAVES

WEST HOLTS STAGE
FRIDAY

DIZZEE RASCAL
ANDERSON .PAAK & THE FREE NATIONALS
LITTLE DRAGON
KATE TEMPEST
PAT THOMAS & THE KWASHIBU AREA BAND
ATA KAK
HENRY WU PRESENTS THE KAMAAL WILLIAMS ENSEMBLE
HOT 8 BRASS BAND

SATURDAY
THE JACKSONS
SOLANGE
THE AVALANCHES
TOOTS & THE MAYTALS
BADBADNOTGOOD
THUNDERCAT
AFRIQUOI
KHRUANGBIN

SUNDAY
JUSTICE
MODERAT
THE CINEMATIC ORCHESTRA
SHAGGY
OUMOU SANGARÉ
YORKSTON, THORNE AND KHAN
RYLEY WALKER
HOUSE GOSPEL CHOIR

JOHN PEEL STAGE
FRIDAY

ANNIE MAC
CLEAN BANDIT
FUTURE ISLANDS
RIDE
DECLAN MCKENNA
THE LEMON TWIGS
DUA LIPA
BLACK HONEY
REWS
DAM

SATURDAY
PHOENIX
FATHER JOHN MISTY
DJ SHADOW
TOVE LO
LOYLE CARNER
CABBAGE
THE AMAZONS
INHEAVEN
MAGGIE ROGERS
JOSH BARRY

SUNDAY
METRONOMY
LONDON GRAMMAR
GOLDFRAPP
TBA
FRANK CARTER AND THE RATTLESNAKES
KING GIZZARD AND THE LIZARD WIZARD
REAL ESTATE
SUNDARA KARMA
OCTOBER DRIFT

THE PARK STAGE
FRIDAY

THE FLAMING LIPS
SLEAFORD MODS
TBA
ANGEL OLSEN
MARK LANEGAN
HAMILTON LEITHAUSER
MARGO PRICE
BO NINGEN
GEORGIA

SATURDAY
WARPAINT
JOE GODDARD
SONGHOY BLUES
TEMPLES
NADIA ROSE
SIGRID
THE MOONLANDINGZ
AMBER ARCADES
KELSEY LU

SUNDAY
KANO
SAMPHA
NICK MULVEY
LISA HANNIGAN
JULIA JACKLIN
ALL WE ARE
DR. DOG
SHE DREW THE GUN
AVALONIAN CHOIR

International Widows Day

International Widows Day takes place annually on 23 June to address the “poverty and injustice faced by millions of widows and their dependents in many countries”. International Widows Day was established by The Loomba Foundation to raise awareness of the issue of widowhood. The significance of 23 June is that it was on that day in 1954 that Shrimati Pushpa Wati Loomba, mother of the foundation’s founder, Lord Loomba, became a widow. The first International Widows Day took place in 2005 and was launched by Lord Loomba and the foundation’s president, Cherie Blair. By the sixth International Widows Day in 2010, events were held in Rwanda, Sri Lanka, the United States, the UK, Nepal, Syria, Kenya, India, Bangladesh and South Africa. On 21 December 2010, the United Nations General Assembly formally adopted 23 June as International Widows Day, endorsing by unanimous acclaim a proposal introduced by President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon. As well as formally recognizing 23 June as a day of observance, the accompanying resolution called upon “Member States, the United Nations system and other international and regional organizations to give special attention to the situation of widows and their children.”

One of the foundation’s key goals is to highlight what it deschjribes as an invisible calamity. A 2010 book, Invisible, Forgotten Sufferers: The Plight of Widows Around the World, estimates that there are 245 million widows worldwide, 115 million of whom live in poverty and suffer from social stigmatization and economic deprivation purely because they have lost their husbands. As part of the Loomba Foundation’s awareness campaign, this study was presented to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on 22 June 2010.

The Loomba Foundation was set up by philanthropist, Liberal Democrat peer, founder and executive chairman of clothing company Rinku Group, and a member of the House of Lords.Rajinder Paul “Raj” Loomba, Baron Loomba, CBE.  Raj Loomba was born  in Dhilwan, in the state of Punjab, India. He was educated at D.A.V. College, Jallandhar and at the State University of Iowa; his family moved to England in 1962. Loomba built up his fashion business from scratch, graduating from a stall at Widnes market to a shop, a wholesale business and then an import company, Rinku Group Ltd. The company has over 200 retail concession outlets in the UK, offices in London, Delhi and China, and supplies major retail groups.

Loomba is a member of the Rotary Club in London, the Institute of Directors and is a Freeman of the City of London. He is Chairman of the Friends of the Three Faiths Forum, is Patron of Children In Need India, and is the Founding Patron of the World Punjabi Organisation. He is Vice President of Barnardo’s and of the Safer London Foundation, a charity backed by the Metropolitan Police. In 1997 he was named Asian of the Year UK by Asian Who’s Who International. Loomba is married to Veena Chaudhry, with whom he has two daughters and one son. He has become well known for his fundraising and campaigning concerning the issue of widowhood in the developing world. His mother, Shrimati Pushpa Wati Loomba, was widowed at the age of 37 in India, and Loomba experienced first-hand the social and economic discrimination that widows in that country faced.

Loomba set up The Loomba Foundation in his mother’s memory. The Loomba Foundation works to raise awareness of the issue of widowhood and it raises funds to educate the children of poor widows in India and empower widows in other developing countries in south Asia and across Africa. The flagship of the charity’s awareness campaign is International Widows Day, which takes place annually on 23 June, the anniversary of his mother’s widowhood. Following a sustained campaign, on 21 December 2010 the United Nations General Assembly formally recognised, by unanimous acclaim, 23 June as International Widows Day. In recognition of his contribution to charity, in the 2008 Birthday Honours Loomba was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).

On 12 January 2011 Loomba was ennobled as a life peer with the name, style and title of Baron Loomba, of Moor Park in the county of Hertfordshire. He took up his seat in the House of Lords on 13 January 2011, representing the Liberal Democrats.[He was introduced to the House on 17 January 2011, supported by the Lords McNally and Dholakia. On 21 January 2011 he gave his maiden speech in the House during a debate on the Rehabilitation of Offenders (Amendment) Bill. In December 2016 Loomba left the Liberal Democrats and now sits as a non-affiliated Peer. Explaining his decision he said: “I now wish to concentrate on issues such as human rights, gender equality, education and above all the United Nations’ 2030 Sustainable Development Goals”.

Loomba’s company, Rinku Group PLC, had previously made a donation of £2,500 to the leadership campaign of Nick Clegg in December 2007. His nomination to the peerage attracted controversy after it emerged that one of the three members of the House of Lords Appointments Commission who approved his appointment, Liberal Democrat peer Lord Dholakia, had accepted six overseas trips in the previous four years, paid for by Loomba’s charitable foundation, the Loomba Trust.

Stuart Sutcliffe

The late great Stuart Sutcliffe, former singer and bassist with The Beatles was Born 23 June 1940. He met John Lennon at Art School joined John Lennon’s skiffle band, the Quarrymen in 1960 alongside Paul McCartney whoformed a close working relationship with Lennon. George Harrison joined in 1958 as lead guitarist, By May 1960 they had tried several new names, including “Johnny and the Moondogs” and “the Silver Beetles”, They changed their name to”the Beatles” in mid-August 1960, and drummer Pete Best was recruited for five engagements in Hamburg, Germany

Unfortunately Stuart Sutcliffe tragically passed away in  10 April 1962 from a brain aneurism and Pete Best left and was replaced by Ringo Starr shortly before Paul McCartney John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Star hit the big time and released their first hit; “Love Me Do” in October, they became increasingly popular in the UK during 1963 and in the US in 1964. Their fans’ frenzied adulation became known as “Beatlemania”; during which McCartney was dubbed the cute Beatle. His contributions to the band’s early hits include: “I Want to Hold Your Hand” (1963); co-written with Lennon, “Can’t Buy Me Love” (1964) and “We Can Work It Out” (1965); co-written with Lennon. In 1965 the Beatles were appointed Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) and they recorded the McCartney composition “Yesterday”, featuring a string quartet. It was the group’s first recorded use of classical music elements in their music and their first recording that did not include more than one band member, McCartney also composed 1966 Beatles’ hits “Paperback Writer” as “a satire of pop ambition” and “Eleanor Rigby”, which included a string octet.

Between 1962 and 1970 the group released twenty-two UK singles and twelve LPs, of which seventeen of the singles and eleven of the LPs became number ones. The band topped the US Billboard Hot 100 twenty times, and recorded fourteen number one albums as Lennon and McCartney became one of the most celebrated songwriting partnerships of the 20th century and produced what some critics consider to be their finest material, including the innovative and widely influential albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966), Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, The Beatles and Abbey Road McCartney was the primary writer of five of their last six US number one singles: “Hello, Goodbye”, “Hey Jude”, which was the band’s most successful single ever, “Get Back”, “Let It Be” and “The Long and Winding Road”. Sadly though on 10 April 1970 Paul McCartney left the Beatles, however he went on to have a highly successful solo career and also formed Wings and collaborated with Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and many more. The album Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts club band has also been re-released to celebrate 50th Anniversary of the release of the original album in 1967.

Alan Turing OBE FRS

British  mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist Alan Turing OBE, FRS was Born June 23rd, 1912 in Maida Vale, and grew up in Hastings. He displayed great individuality from a young age. At 14 he went to Sherborne School in Dorset. Turing read mathematics at Cambridge, he was a completely original thinker who shaped the modern world, and assisted in the development of the innovative Manchester computers. He was also highly influential in the development of computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of “algorithm” and “computation” with the Turing machine, which played a sinificant role in the creation of the modern computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of computer science and artificial intelligece.He also became interested in mathematical biology and wrote a paper on the chemical basis of morphogenesis, and predicted oscillating chemical reactions such as the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, which were first observed in the 1960s.

On 4 September 1939 the day after Britain declared war on Germany, Turing reported to Bletchley Park where he worked for the Government Code and Cypher School (GCCS)the forerunner of GCHQ, Britain’s codebreaking centre. For a time he was head of Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. Turing led a team whose ingenuity and intellect were turned to the task of breaking German ciphers. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers and One of Turing’s main contributions whilst there was to invent the Bombe, an electromechanical machine used to find the daily settings of the Enigma machine. as a result he played an absolutely vital part of the British war effort and It is without question that his efforts helped shorten the war significantly, saving the lives of millions of people.He was also a remarkable British hero who helped create the modern world. Now known as the father of computer science, his inventions contributed greatly to the groundwork for the modern computer.

After the war he worked at the National Physical Laboratory, where he created one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, the ACE. In 1948 Turing joined Max Newman’s Computing Laboratory at Manchester University, where he assisted in the development of the Manchester computers and invented a type of theoretical machine now called a Turing Machine, which formalized what it means to compute a number. Turing’s importance extends far beyond Turing Machines. His work deciphering secret codes drastically shortened World War II and pioneered early computer technology.He was also an early innovator in the field of artificial intelligence, and came up with a way to test if computers could think – now known as the Turing Test. Besides this abstract work, he was down to earth; he designed and built real machines, even making his own relays and wiring up circuits. This combination of pure math and computing machines was the foundation of computer science.

Despite his invaluable help during World War II AND all his other achievements, he was treated badly. A burglary at his home led Turing to admit to police that he was a practicing homosexual, at a time when it was illegal in Britain. This led to his arrest and conviction in 1952 for ‘gross indecency’. He was subsequently forced to choose between imprisonment and chemical castration. He chose chemical castration (treatment with female hormones) as an alternative to prison. As a result of his conviction he lost security clearance and was not allowed to continue his work, and Sadly On 8 June 1954 Turing committed suicide just over two weeks before his 42nd birthday.

Luckily since Turing’s birth, attitudes have changed towars homosexuality and The US-based Association of Computing Machinery has given The Turing Award annually since 1966. This is the computing world’s highest honour for technical contribution to the computing community and considered equivalent to the Nobel prize.On 10 September 2009, following an Internet campaign, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown also made an official public apology on behalf of the British government for “the appalling way he was treated”. Despite his valuable contributions Turing did not receive the recognition and plaudits that he deserved while alive, However this has now been redressed and there is now A fully functional replica of the Bombe which can be found today at Bletchley Park, along with the excellent Turing exhibition. Turing has also been immortalised on film in The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

Oskar Fischinger

German-American abstract animator, filmmaker, and painter Oskar Wilhelm Fischinger was born 22 June 1900. He is notable for creating abstract musical animation many decades before the appearance of computer graphics and music videos. He created special effects for Fritz Lang’s 1929 Woman in the Moon, one of the first sci-fi rocket movies. He made over 50 short films, and painted around 800 canvases, many of which are in museums, galleries and collections worldwide. Among his film works is Motion Painting No. 1 (1947), which is now listed on the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress.

Fischinger apprenticed at an organ-building firm after he finished school until the owners were drafted into World War I. The next year he worked as a draftsman in an architect’s office, until he too was called to duty. However, since he was too “unhealthy”, he was rejected from combat duty. After the war, the Fischinger family moved west to Frankfurt. There Fischinger attended a trade school and worked as an apprentice, eventually obtaining an Engineer’s Diploma. In Frankfurt, Fischinger met the theatre critic Bernhard Diebold, who introduced Fischinger to Walter Ruttmann, a pioneer in abstract film. Inspired by Ruttmann’s work, Fischinger began experimenting with colored liquids and three-dimensional modelling materials such as wax and clay. He invented a “Wax Slicing Machine”, which synchronized a vertical slicer with a movie camera’s shutter, enabling the efficient imaging of progressive cross-sections through a length of molded wax and clay. Fischinger wrote to Ruttmann about his machine, who expressed interest. Moving to Munich, Fischinger licensed the wax slicing machine to Ruttmann, who used it to make some backgrounds for Lotte Reiniger’s Prince Achmed film. During this time Fischinger shot many abstract tests of his own using the machine. Some of these are distributed today under the assigned title Wax Experiments.

In 1924, Fischinger was hired by American entrepreneur Louis Seel to produce satirical cartoons that tended toward mature audiences. He also made abstract films and tests of his own, trying new and different techniques, including the use of multiple projectors. “In 1926 and 1927, Fischinger performed his own multiple projector film shows with various musical accompaniments. These shows were titled Fieber (Fever), Vakuum, Macht (Power) and later, R-1 ein Formspiel” In 2012, a multiple screen event, “Raumlichtkunst,” from the series first performed in Germany in 1926, was reconstructed by the Center for Visual Music and exhibited at the Whitney Museum and Tate Modern, London. Following financial difficulties, Fischinger borrowed from his family, and landlady until Finally leaving Munich for Berlin in June 1927. Taking only his essential equipment, he walked 350 miles through the countryside, shooting single frames that were released many decades later as the film Walking from Munich to Berlin.

Arriving in Berlin, Fischinger borrowed some money from a relative and set up a studio on Friedrichstraße. He soon was doing the special effects for various films and In 1928, he was hired to work on space epic Woman in the Moon (German: Frau im Mond), directed by Fritz Lang, which provided him a steady salary for a time. On his own time, he experimented with charcoal-on-paper animation. He produced a series of abstract Studies that were synchronized to popular and classical music. A few of the early Studies were synchronized to new record releases by Electrola, and screened at first-run theatres with a tail credit advertising the record, thus making them, in a sense, the very first music videos.

The Studies — Numbers 1 through 12 — were well received at art theatres and many were distributed to first-run theatres throughout Europe. Some of the Studies were distributed to theatres in Japan and the US. His Studie Nr. 5 screened at the 1931 “Congress for Colour-Music Research” to critical acclaim. In 1931, Universal Pictures purchased distribution rights to Studie Nr. 5 for the American public, and Studie Nr. 7 screened as a short with a popular movie in Berlin, and many other cities worldwide. The special effects Fischinger did for other movies led to his being called “the Wizard of Friedrichstraße”. In 1932, Fischinger married Elfriede Fischinger, a first cousin from his hometown of Gelnhausen.

By 1933, the abstract film and art communities quickly disappeared as the Nazis considered it “degenerate art”. His brother Hans Fischinger showed his absolute film “Tanz der Farben” (i.e. The Dance of Colors) in Hamburg in 1939. Oskar Fischinger continued to make films, and also found work producing commercials and advertisements, among them Muratti Greift Ein (translated as Muratti Gets in the Act, or Muratti Marches On) (1934), for a cigarette company, and Kreise (Circles) (1933-34), for an advert agency. The color Muratti commercial with its stop-motion dancing cigarettes screened all over Europe. Though Fischinger at times ran afoul of the Nazi authorities, he managed to complete his abstract work Komposition in Blau in 1935. It was well-received critically, and contrary to popular myth, was legally registered.[5] An agent from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer screened a print of Komposition in Blau and Muratti in a small art theatre in Hollywood, and Ernst Lubitsch was impressed by the films and the audience’s enthusiastic response to the shorts. An agent from Paramount Pictures telephoned Fischinger, asking if he was willing to work in the United States, and Fischinger promptly agreed.

After arriving in Hollywood in February 1936, Fischinger was given an office at Paramount, German-speaking secretaries, an English tutor, and a weekly salary of $250. He and Elfriede socialized with the émigré community, but felt out of place among the elites. As he waited for his assignment to begin, Fischinger sketched and painted.[6] He prepared a film which was originally named Radio Dynamics, tightly synchronized to Ralph Rainger’s tune “Radio Dynamics”. This short film was planned for inclusion in the feature film The Big Broadcast of 1937 (1936). However, Paramount only planned to release in black-and-white film, which was not communicated to Fischinger when he began his work. Paramount would not allow even a test in color of Fischinger’s film. Fischinger requested to be let out of his contract and left Paramount. Several years later, with the help of Hilla von Rebay and a grant from the Museum of Non-Objective Painting (later The Guggenheim), he was able to buy the film back from Paramount. Fischinger then redid and re-painted the cels and made a color version to his satisfaction which he then called Allegretto. This became one of the most-screened and successful films of visual music’s history, and one of Fischinger’s most popular films.

Most of Fischinger’s filmmaking attempts in America suffered difficulties. He composed An Optical Poem (1937) to Franz Liszt’s Second Hungarian Rhapsody for MGM, but received no profits due to studio bookkeeping systems. He designed the J. S. Bach Toccata and Fugue in D Minor sequence for Walt Disney’s Fantasia (1940), but quit without credit because Disney altered his designs to be more representational. According to William Moritz, Fischinger contributed to the effects animation of the Blue Fairy’s wand in Pinocchio (1940).[7] In the 1950s, Fischinger created several animated TV advertisements, including one for Muntz TV. The Museum of Non-Objective Painting commissioned him to synchronize a film with a march by John Philip Sousa in order to demonstrate loyalty to America, and then insisted that he make a film to Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, even though he wanted to make a film without sound in order to affirm the integrity of his non-objective imagery. Secretly, Fischinger composed the silent movie Radio Dynamics (1942).

Frustrated in his filmmaking, Fischinger turned increasingly to oil painting as a creative outlet. Although the Guggenheim Foundation specifically requested a cel animation film, Fischinger made his Bach film Motion Painting No. 1 (1947) as a documentation of the act of painting, taking a single frame each time he made a brush stroke—and the multi-layered style merely parallels the structure of the Bach music without any tight synchronization. Although he never again received funding for any of his personal films (only some commercial work), the Motion Painting No. 1 won the Grand Prix at the Brussels International Experimental Film Competition in 1949. Three of Fischinger’s films also made the 1984 Olympiad of Animation’s list of the world’s greatest films.

Fischinger’s papers, films, photographs, and many animation drawings are in the collection of Center for Visual Music (CVM), Los Angeles, which owns and manages the films. They maintain a vimeo channel with excerpts and VOD films, and are releasing the second DVD compilation of his works in late 2017. CVM also has the papers of Elfriede Fischinger and Fischinger’s biographer Dr. William Moritz. CVM has preserved many of Fischinger’s films including Spirals, Wax Experiments, early tests and experiments, Squares, Study no. 5, Study no. 7, Allegretto, Radio Dynamics and others, and also reconstructed his 1926 Raumlichtkunst project which has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum, NY; Tate Modern, London and other museums worldwide. The Fischinger Trust in California administers Fischinger’s paintings, and their official art dealer representing the painting estate is Peyton-Wright Gallery, Santa Fe.

In the late 1940s Fischinger invented the Lumigraph (patented in 1955) which some have mistakenly called a type of color organ. Like other inventors of color organs, Fischinger hoped to make the Lumigraph a commercial product, widely available for anyone, but this did not happen. The instrument produced imagery by pressing against a rubberized screen so it could protrude into a narrow beam of colored light. As a visual instrument, the size of its screen was limited by the reach of the performer. Two people were required to operate the Lumigraph: one to manipulate the screen to create imagery, and a second to change the colors of the lights on cue.

The device itself was silent, but was performed accompanying various music. Fischinger gave several performances in Los Angeles and one in San Francisco in the early 1950s, performing various classical and popular music pieces, and many were impressed by the machine’s spectacular images. In 1964 the Lumigraph was used in the science fiction film The Time Travelers, in which it became a ‘lumichord’, although this was not Fischinger’s intent, but the decision of the film’s producers. Fischinger’s son Conrad even built two more machines in different sizes.

Sadly Fischinger died in Los Angeles in 31 January 1967. After his death, his widow Elfriede and daughter Barbara gave performances with the Lumigraph, along with William Moritz, in Europe and the US. Today one of the instruments is in the collection of the Deutsches Filmmuseum in Frankfurt, and the other two are in California. In February 2007 Barbara Fischinger performed on the original Lumigraph in Frankfurt, and in 2012 in Amsterdam. Film and video documentation of Elfriede’s Lumigraph performances are at the Center for Visual Music in Los Angeles, as well as documentation of Barbara’s 2012 rehearsal, showing how the Lumigraph is operated.