International Free Hug Day

International Free Hugs day takes place annually on 1 July. It was instigated by The Free Hugs Campaign, a social movement involving individuals who offer hugs to strangers in public places. The hugs are meant to be random acts of kindness—selfless acts performed just to make others feel better. International Free Hugs Month is celebrated on the first Saturday of July and continues until August first. International Free hugs day is inspired by Jason Hunter’s mother who said to him, “Let everyone know that they are important person.” and she died. From his mother’s will, he thought free hug. The campaign was started in 2004 by an Australian man known only by the pseudonym “Juan Mann” and The campaign became famous internationally in 2006 as the result of a music video on YouTube by the Australian band Sick Puppies. Juan Mann started The Free Hugs campaign 2004. By giving out hugs in the Pitt Street Mall in central Sydney. In the months prior to this, Mann had been feeling depressed and lonely as a result of numerous personal difficulties. However, he discovered that a random hug from a stranger made an enormous difference and this inspired him. Mann carried the now iconic “FREE HUGS” sign from the outset. However, on his first attempt in his hometown, where he returned to find that he was the only person he knew, as his friends and family had moved away, he had to wait fifteen minutes before an elderly lady came up to him and gave him a hug

Initial distrust of Juan Mann’s motives eventually gave way to a gradual increase of people willing to be hugged, with other huggers (male and female) helping distribute them. In October 2005 police told them they must stop, as Mann had not obtained public liability insurance worth $25 million for his actions. Mann and his companions used a petition to attempt to convince authorities that his campaign should be allowed to continue without the insurance. His petition reached 10,000 signatures. He submitted it and was allowed to continue giving free hugs. Mann befriended Shimon Moore, lead singer for Sick Puppies, shortly after commencing his campaign, and over a two-month period in late 2005 Moore recorded video footage of Mann and his fellow huggers. Moore and his band moved to Los Angeles in March 2005 and nothing was immediately done with the footage. Meanwhile, Mann continued his campaign throughout 2005 and 2006 by appearing in Pitt Street Mall in Sydney most Thursday afternoons.

Sadly In 2006 Mann’s grandmother died, and in consolation Moore made the music video using the footage he had shot in 2004 to send to Mann as a gift. Then On October 30, 2006, Juan Mann appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show after after being spotted outside her studio, offering free hugs to the crowd waiting to see the taping of that day’s episode. On October 23, 2007, Juan Mann announced his residential address online and offered an open invitation to anyone to come over and chat on-camera as part of his ‘open-house project’. Mann hosted 80 guests over 36 days. On November 25, 2007, Mann’s landlord threatened him with eviction, so he launched an online appeal. In 2007, Juan Mann published an e-book as a free download. On November 22, 2008, at YouTube Live Sick Puppies did a performance of “All the Same” while Juan Mann gave hugs to crowd members. On February 13, 2009 a Free Hug Day took place.

A website that is generally recognized as the official site of the free hugs campaign, The Official Home of the Free Hugs Campaign, was launched in mid-2007. This site enables those involved in the campaign to better organize themselves and coordinate their efforts. Many initiatives resulted from these efforts. Juan Mann declared that the day would fall on the first Saturday following June 30 each year; this being the first date that Juan ever offered free hugs in Pitt Street Mall, Sydney in 2004. The first International Free Hugs Day was July 7, 2007, the second on July 5, 2008, and the third was on July 4, 2009. Juan Mann’s Official Blog remained dormant after his apparent retirement but has been updated at times; it proclaims itself as the “true home” of the Free Hugs Campaign and hosts interviews conducted with individuals holding Free Hugs Campaigns internationally. In Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, two men were arrested by the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice for offering free hugs in a public space. The move was criticized on Twitter, however others opposed the campaign altogether.

Roddy Bottum (Faith no More)

Roddy Bottum, American singer and keyboard player (Faith NoMore and Imperial Teen) was born 1 July 1963. Faith No More hail from San Francisco, California, and were regarded as one of the most influential metal/rock bands of the late 80s and early 90s, and credited for inventing alternative metal and as an influence on nu metal.

The band was formed originally as Faith No Man in 1981 by bassist Billy Gould, keyboardist Wade Worthington, vocalist M Morris, and drummer Mike Bordin.A year later when Worthington was replaced by keyboardist Roddy Bottum, who along with Gould and Bordin, formed Faith No More. After going through a series of singers which included Courtney Love, the band was joined by Chuck Mosley in 1983. The same year, Jim Martin was recruited to replace guitarist Mark Bowen. Faith No More underwent several line-up changes before releasing their first album, We Care a Lot, in 1985. Within a year the band signed up withSlash Records, and in 1987 their second album Introduce Yourself was released. Membership remained stable until vocalist Mosley was replaced by Mike Patton in 1988. In 1989, the band released their highly successful album, The Real Thing, which featured the songs“Epic, Falling To Pieces, From Out of Nowhere and Small Victory.

FAITH NO MORE THE REAL THING http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hiyvw5AD-C8

The band’s next album, 1992′s Angel Dust, was also highly successful and spawned the hit Midlife Crisis, , which became their sole #1 hit on the Modern Rock Tracks chart.The next album Angel Dust is widely considered to be one of the most influential albums of the 90′s. Faith No More however declined in popularity in the subsequent years. Longtime guitarist Jim Martin left the group in 1994 and was replaced by Mr. Bungle guitarist Trey Spruance. After the release of their next album, 1995′s King for a Day… Fool for a Lifetime, Spruance was replaced briefly by Dean Menta, who would eventually be replaced by their current guitarist Jon Hudson. After releasing one more album, Album of the Year, in 1997, Faith No More broke up in April 1998, and all members began work on side projects.

On February 24, 2009, Faith No More announced that they would be reforming for a Europan tour with the same lineup at the time of their breakup.In June 2009, they performed together for the first time in eleven years at the Brixton Academy in London, United Kingdom, as part of their The Second Coming Tour. Throughout 2010, the band continued to perform at multiple live venues. In September 2010, the band announced that the reunion tour would come to an end in December and plans for a new album had been scrapped, although bassist Billy Gould has said recently that the band might continue. Faith No More returned again in November 14th 2011 at the SWU Music and Arts Festival, in the Brazilian city of Paulínia, as well on three other dates. Trey Spruance joined the band onstage for the very first time to perform the King for a Day, Fool for a Lifetime album in its entirety in Santiago, Chile in November 2011.

Debbie Harry (Blondie)

Debbie Harry American singer with the band Blondie was born 1st July 1945. Blondie were founded by singer Deborah Harry and guitarist Chris Stein, and were pioneers in the early American New Wave and punk scenes of the mid-1970s. Their first two albums contained strong elements of these genres, and although successful in the United Kingdom and Australia, Blondie was regarded as an underground band in the United States until the release of Parallel Lines in 1978. Over the next three years, the band achieved several hit singles including “Call Me“, “Atomic” and Heart of Glass and became noted for its eclectic mix of musical styles incorporating elements of disco, pop, rap, and reggae, while retaining a basic style as a New Wave band.

Sadly though Blondie broke up after the release of their sixth studio album The Hunter in 1982. However Deborah Harry continued to pursue a solo career with varied results after taking a few years off to care for partner Chris Stein, who was diagnosed with pemphigus, a rare autoimmune disease of the skin. The band reformed in 1997, achieving renewed success and a number one single in the United Kingdom with “Maria” in 1999. During the following years The group toured and performed throughout the world, and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006. Blondie have sold 40 million records worldwide and are still active today. Their ninth studio album, Panic of Girls, was released in 2011. They have also played at Glastonbury Festival’s Sunday afternoon slot.

THE BEST OF BLONDIE http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=7ZM6UeOLing

Louis Blériot

French pilot, inventor and engineer Louis Charles Joseph Blériot was born 1 July 1872 Born at No.17h rue de l’Arbre à Poires (now rue Sadi-Carnot) in Cambrai. In 1882, aged 10, Blériot was sent as a boarder to the Institut Notre Dame in Cambrai, where he frequently won class prizes, including one for engineering drawing. When he was 15, he moved on to the Lycée at Amiens, where he lived with an aunt. After passing the exams for his baccalaureate in science and German, he determined to try to enter the prestigious École Centrale and Blériot spent a year at the Collège Sainte-Barbe in Paris. He passed the exam, placing 74th among the 243 successful candidates, and doing especially well in the tests of engineering drawing ability. After three years of demanding study at the École Centrale, Blériot graduated 113th of 203 in his graduating class. He then embarked on a term of compulsory military service, and spent a year as a sub-lieutenant in the 24th Artillery Regiment, stationed in Tarbes in the Pyrenees.

He got a job with Baguès, an electrical engineering company in Paris where he developed the world’s first practical headlamp for automobiles, using a compact integral acetylene generator. In 1897, Blériot opened a showroom for headlamps at 41 rue de Richlieu in Paris and soon began supplying his lamps to both Renault and Panhard-Levassor. In 1901 Bleriot married Alice Védères,

Blériot became interested in aviation while at the Ecole Centrale, inspired by seeing Clément Ader’s Avion III at the 1900 Exposition Universelle. In 1905, Blériot met Gabriel Voisin, then employed by Ernest Archdeacon to assist with his experimental gliders. Blériot was a spectator at Voisin’s first trials of the floatplane glider he had built on 8 June 1905. Cine photography was among Blériot’s hobbies, and he filmed the flight. Bleriot asked Voisin to build a simillar machine the Blériot II glider. However attempts to fly the aircraft ended in a crash in which Voisin nearly drowned, but this did not deter Blériot and he entered into partnership with Voisin and the two men established the Ateliers d’ Aviation Edouard Surcouf, Blériot et Voisin. Active between 1905 and 1906, the company built two unsuccessful powered aircraft, the Blériot III and the Blériot IV, powered with the lightweight Antoinette engines being developed by Léon Levavasseur. The Blériot IV was damaged in a taxiing accident at Bagatelle on 12 November 1906. This was made worse by the success of Alberto Santos Dumont later that day, when he managed to fly his 14-bis a distance of 220 metres (720 ft), at Bagatelle, winning the Aéro Club de France prize for the first flight of over 100 metres.

Blériot then established his own business, Recherches Aéronautiques Louis Blériot, where he started creating his own aircraft, experimenting with various configuration and creating the world’s first successful powered monoplane the Blériot V, in 1907. At first Blériot limited his experiments to ground runs, which resulted in damage to the undercarriage. Two further ground trials, also damaged the aircraft. The first successful flight was only of around 6 m (20 ft), after which he cut his engine and landed, slightly damaging the undercarriage. Then while travelling at a speed of around 50 kph (30 mph), the aircraft left the ground, Blériot over-responded when the nose began to rise, and the machine hit the ground nose–first, and somersaulted. The aircraft was largely destroyed, luckily Blériot was, unhurt. This was followed by the tandem wing Blériot VI, Which successfully flew a distance of 25–30 metres (84–100 ft), reaching an altitude of around 2 m (7 ft). Further successful flights took place, and he subsequently flew 150 m (490 ft). However the aircraft was damaged by a heavy landing having reached an altitude of 12 m (39 ft). He then fitted a 50 hp (37 kW) V-16 Antoinette engine which resulted in improved performance with the aircraft reaching an altitude of 25 m (82 ft), unfortunately the engine suddenly cut out and the aircraft went into a spiralling nosedive. Thanks to some quick thinking His only injuries were some minor cuts on the face, caused by fragments of glass from his broken goggles. After this crash Blériot abandoned the aircraft.

His next plane Blériot VII, was a monoplane with tail surfaces and differential elevators for lateral control which became the modern conventional layout. It first flew on 16 November 1907, and is recognised as the first successful monoplane. Blériot managed two flights of over 500 metres, including a successful U-turn. This was the most impressive achievement to date of any of the French pioneer aviators. Major Baden Baden-Powell, president of the Royal Aeronautical Society, was also interested. more successful flights were made , but the undercarriage collapsed and the aircraft overturned and was wrecked. Blériot’s next aircraft, the Blériot VIII was demonstrated in 1908. It was modified After a few teething trouble and made a cross-country flight, from Toury to Arteny and back, a total distance of 28 km (17 mi). Sadly Four days later, the aircraft was destroyed in a taxiing accident. Three different aircraft were displayed at the first Paris Aero Salon, held at the end of December: the Blériot IX monoplane, the Blériot X, a three-seat pusher biplane and the Blériot XI which used Antoinette engines, but never flew. The powerplant for Type XI was replaced by a REP engine and first flew in 1909 although the aircraft flew well, the engine overheated, so Blériot got in contact with engineer Alessandro Anzani, who had developed a successful motorcycle engines and aero-engines and also met Lucien Chauviere, who had designed a sophisticated laminated walnut propeller. The combination of a reliable engine and an efficient propeller would contribute greatly to the success of the Type XI. This was shortly followed by the Blériot XII, a high-wing two-seater monoplane which became the first plane to fly with two passenger. he made a flight lasting 15 minutes and 30 seconds, increasing it to over 36 minute. He then took part in an aviation meet at Douai, where he made a flight lasting over 47 minutes in the Type XII and also flew the Type XI for 50 minutes at another meet at Juvisy. he made a cross-country flight of 41 km (25 mi) from Etampes to Orléans but was slightly injureIn1909, Blériot and Voisin were jointly awarded the Prix Osiris, by the Institut de France for making the greatest contribution to science.

In 1909 Bleriot stated his intention to cross the English Channel in an aeroplane, after The Daily Mail offered a prize of £1000 to the first person who flew across the English Channel. Blériot had three rivals for the prize, Charles de Lambert, a Russian aristocrat with French ancestry, and one of Wilbur Wright’s pupils, Arthur Seymour, an Englishman who reputedly owned a Voisin biplane and Hubert Latham. The event created great public interest: it was reported that there were 10,000 visitors at Calais, and a similar crowd gathered at Dover, and the Marconi Company set up a special radio link for the occasion, with one station on Cap Blanc Nez at Sangatte and the other on the roof of the Lord Warden Hotel in Dover. The crowds were in for a wait: the weather was windy, and Latham did not make an attempt until 19 July, but 6 miles (9.7 km) from his destination his aircraft developed engine trouble and was forced to make the world’s first landing of an aircraft on the sea. Latham was rescued by the French destroyer harpon. and taken back to France, where he was met by the news that Blériot had entered the competition. Blériot, accompanied by two mechanics and his friend Alfred Leblanc, arrived in Calais on Wednesday 21 July and set up their base at a farm near the beach at Les Baraques, between Calais and Sangatte. The following day a replacement aircraft for Latham was delivered from the Antoinette factory. The wind was too strong for an attempted crossing on Friday and Saturday, but on Saturday evening it began to drop, raising hopes in both camps.Leblanc went to bed at around midnight but was too keyed up to sleep well; at two o’clock, he was up, and judging that the weather was ideal woke Blériot who, unusually, was pessimistic and had to be persuaded to eat breakfast. His spirits revived, however, and by half past three, his wife Alice had been put on board the destroyer Escopette, which was to escort the flight.

Blériot first made a short trial flight and then, on a signal that the sun had risen (the competition rules required a flight between sunrise and sunset), he took off at 4.41 for the attempted crossing. Flying at approximately 45 mph (72 km/h) and an altitude of about 250 ft (76 m), he set off across the Channel. Not having a compass, Blériot took his course from the Escopette, which was heading for Dover, but he soon overtook the ship. Sadly The visibility deteriorted The grey line of the English coast, however, came into sight in his left; the wind had increased, and had blown him to the east of his intended course. Altering course, he followed the line of the coast about a mile offshore until he spotted Charles Fontaine, the correspondent from Le Matin waving a large Tricolour as a signal. He Landed on a patch of gently sloping land called Northfall Meadow, close to Dover Castle, where there was a low point in the cliffs. Once over land, he circled twice to lose height, and cut his engine at an altitude of about 20 m (66 ft), making a heavy landing due to the gusty wind conditions; the undercarriage was damaged and one blade of the propeller was shattered, but Blériot was unhurt. The flight had taken 36 minutes and 30 seconds.

Blériot’s success brought about an immediate transformation of the status of Recherches Aéronautiques Louis Blériot. By the time of the Channel flight, he had spent at least 780,000 francs on his aviation experiments. (To put this figure into context, one of Blériot’s skilled mechanics was paid 250 francs a month.) Now this investment began to pay off: orders for copies of the Type XI quickly came, and by the end of the year, orders for over 100 aircraft had been received, each selling for 10,000 francs.At the end of August, Blériot was one of the flyers at the Grande Semaine d’Aviation held at Reims, where he was narrowly beaten byGlenn Curtiss in the first Gordon Bennett Trophy. Blériot did, however, succeed in winning the prize for the fastest lap of the circuit, establishing a new world speed record for aircraft.Blériot followed his flights at Reims with appearances at other aviation meetings in Brescia, Budapest, Bucharest (making the first airplane flight in both Hungary and Romania. Up to this time he had had great good luck in walking away from accidents that had destroyed the aircraft, but his luck deserted him in December 1910 at an aviation meeting in Istanbul. Flying in gusty conditions to placate an impatient and restive crowd, he crashed on top of a house, breaking several ribs and suffering internal injuries: he was hospitalized for three weeks.

Between 1909 and the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Blériot produced about 900 aircraft, most of them variations of the Type XI model. Blériot monoplanes and Voisin-type biplanes, with the latter’s Farman derivatives dominated the pre-war aviation market.There were concerns about the safety of monoplanes in general, both in France and the UK. However trials supported Blériot’s analysis of the problem and led to a strengthening of the landing wiresAlong with five other European aircraft builders, from 1910, Blériot was involved in a five-year legal struggle with the Wright Brothers . From 1913 or earlier,Blériot’s aviation activities were handled by Blériot Aéronautique, based at Suresnes, which continued to design and produce aircraft up to the nationalisation of most of the French aircraft industry in 1937, when it was absorbed intoSNCASO. In 1913, a consortium led by Blériot bought the Société pour les Appareils Deperdussin aircraft manufacturer and he became the president of the company in 1914. He renamed it the Société Pour L’Aviation et ses Dérivés (SPAD); this company produced World War Ifighter aircraft such as the SPAD S.XIII.Before World War I, Blériot had opened British flying schools at Brooklands, in Surrey and at Hendon Aerodrome.[34] Realising that a British company would have more chance to sell his models to the British government, in 1915, he set up the Blériot Manufacturing Aircraft Company Ltd. The hoped for orders did not follow, as the Blériot design was seen as outdated. Following an unresolved conflict over control of the company, it was wound up on 24 July 1916. Even before the closure of this company Blériot was planning a new venture in the UK. Initially named Blériot and SPAD Ltd and based in Addlestone, it became the Air Navigation and Engineering Company (ANEC) in May 1918. ANEC survived in a difficult aviation climate until late 1926, producing Blériot Whippet cars as well as several light aircraft.

In 1927, Blériot, long retired from flying, was present to welcome Charles Lindbergh when he landed at Le Bourget field completing his transatlantic flight. The two men, separated in age by 30 years, had each made history by crossing famous bodies of water. Together, they participated in a famous photo opportunity in Paris.In 1934, Blériot visited Newark Airport in New Jersey and predicted commercial overseas flights by 1938.Blériot remained active in the aviation business until his death on 1 August 1936 in Paris of a heart attack. After a funeral with full military honours at Les Invalides he was buried in the Cimetière des Gonards in Versailles. t3to honour his legacy the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale established the “Louis Blériot medal” in 1936. The medal may be awarded up to three times a year to record setters in speed, altitude and distance categories in light aircraft, and is still being awarde. On 25 July 2009, the centenary of the original Channel crossing, Frenchman Edmond Salis took off from Blériot Beach in an exact replica of Blériot’s monoplane. He landed successfully in Kent at the Duke of York’s Royal Military School.

Canada Day

Canada day takes place annually on 1 July. Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres (3.85 million square miles), making it the world’s second-largest country by total area and the fourth-largest country by land area. Canada’s sole border with the United States is the world’s longest bi-national land border. The majority of the country has a cold or severely cold winter climate, but southerly areas are warm in summer. Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land territory being dominated by forest and tundra and the Rocky Mountains. It is highly urbanized with 82 per cent of the 35.15 million people concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. One third of the population lives in the three largest metropolitan areas: Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. Its capital is Ottawa, and other major urban areas include Calgary, Edmonton, Quebec City, Winnipeg and Hamilton.

Various indigenous peoples had inhabited what is now Canada for thousands of years prior to European colonization. Beginning in the 16th century, British and French claims were made on the area, with the colony of Canada first being established by the French in 1535 during Jacques Cartier’s second voyage to New France. As a consequence of various conflicts, Great Britain gained and lost territories within British North America until it was left, in the late 18th century, with what mostly geographically comprises Canada today. Pursuant to the British North America Act, on July 1, 1867, the colonies of Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia joined to form the semi-autonomous federal Dominion of Canada. This began an accretion of provinces and territories to the mostly self-governing Dominion to the present ten provinces and three territories forming modern Canada.

In 1931, Canada achieved near-total independence from the United Kingdom with the Statute of Westminster 1931, but at the time, Canada decided to allow the British Parliament to temporarily retain the power to amend Canada’s constitution, on request from the Parliament of Canada. With the Constitution Act 1982, Canada took over that authority (as the conclusion of Patriation), removing the last remaining ties of legal dependence on the British Parliament, giving the country full sovereignty.

Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II being the head of state. The country is officially bilingual at the federal level. It is one of the world’s most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many other countries. Its advanced economy is the eleventh-largest in the world, relying chiefly upon its abundant natural resources and well-developed international trade networks. Canada’s long and complex relationship with the United States has had a significant impact on its economy and culture.

Canada is a developed country and has the tenth-highest nominal per capita income globally as well as the ninth-highest ranking in the Human Development Index. It ranks among the highest in international measurements of government transparency, civil liberties, quality of life, economic freedom, and education. Canada is a realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, a member of the Francophonie, and part of several major international and intergovernmental institutions or groupings including the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the G7 (formerly G8), the Group of Ten, the G20, the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.