Michael Shrieve (Santana)

Michael Shrieve, American composer, drummer, and percussionist with the band Santana was born 6 July 1949 .Shrieve’s first full-time band was called Glass Menagerie, he then joimed the house band of an R&B club, backing touring musicians including B.B. King and Etta James. At 16, Shrieve played in a jam session at the Fillmore Auditorium, where he attracted the attention of Santana’s manager, Stan Marcum. When he was 19, Shrieve jammed with Santana at a recording studio and was invited to join that day.The 2004 two-disc Legacy release of Santana features additional tracks recorded before Shrieve joined the band.

Lead singer Carlos Santana originally formed Santana at Bill Graham’s Fillmore West. During a Sunday matinee show, after Paul Butterfield was slated to perform there but was unable to do so as a result of being intoxicated. Graham assembled an impromptu band of musicians he knew primarily through his connections with Butterfield’s band and with the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane, but he had not yet chosen all the guitarists. Santana’s manager, Stan Marcum, immediately suggested to Graham that Santana join the impromptu band and Graham agreed. During the jam session, Santana’s guitar playing and solo gained the notice of both the audience and Graham. During the same year, Santana formed the Santana Blues Band, with fellow street musicians David Brown (bass guitar), Marcus Malone (percussion) and Gregg Rolie (lead vocals, Hammond Organ.

Santana, pioneered a fusion of rock and Latin American music. The band’s sound featured his melodic, blues-based guitar lines set against Latin and African rhythms featuring percussion instruments . With their highly original blend of Latin-infused rock, jazz, blues, salsa and African rhythms, the band (which quickly adopted their frontman’s name, Santana) gained an immediate following on the San Francisco club circuit. The band’s early success, capped off by a memorable performance at Woodstock in 1969, led to him signing a recording contract with Columbia Records, then run by Clive Davis. During the recording of their first album The drummer Bob Livingston was replaced with Mike Shrieve, who had a strong background in both jazz and rock. Percussionist Marcus Malone quit the band due to involuntary manslaughter charges, and the band re-enlisted Michael Carabello. Carabello brought with him percussionist Jose Chepito Areas. Bill Graham, a Latin Music aficionado, had been a fan of the band from its inception, and arranged for them to appear at the Woodstock Music and Art Festival before their debut album was even released. their set became legendary and later the exposure of their eleven-minute instrumental “Soul Sacrifice” in the Woodstock film and soundtrack album vastly increased their popularity and, troduced them to an international audience and garnered critical acclaim. Their first album, Santana, was released in August 1969 and became a huge hit, containing the catchy single “Evil Ways”

The band’s sudden success put pressure on the group, highlighting the different musical directions in which Rolie and Santana were starting to go. Rolie, along with some of the other band members, wanted to emphasize a basic hard rock sound which had been a key component in establishing the band from the start. Santana, however, was increasingly interested in moving beyond his love of blues and rock and wanted more jazzy, ethereal elements in the music, which were influenced by his fascination with Gábor Szabó, Miles Davis, Pharoah Sanders, and John Coltrane, as well as his growing interest in spirituality. At the same time, Chepito Areas was stricken with a near-fatal brain hemorrhage, however Michael Carabello, felt it was wrong to perform publicly without Areas. Cliques formed, and the band started to disintegrate.

On August 16, 1969, Santana played the Woodstock Festival, shortly after Shrieve’s twentieth birthday, but before the release of their eponymous first album (1969). Following their highly acclaimed live performance at the Woodstock Festival in August 1969 He continued with Santana for Abraxas (1970), which had a mix of rock, blues, jazz, salsa and other influences. Abraxas included two of Santana’s most enduring and well-known hits, “Oye Como Va”, and “Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen”. Santana III (1971),containing the hits “Everybody’s Everything” and “No One to Depend On”. Caravanserai (1972), Welcome (1973), Borboletta (1974) and the live Lotus (1974). He also co-wrote four of the tracks on Caravanserai, as well as co-produced the album.

Sadly Tension between members of the band continued, Along with musical differences, drug use became a problem Growing resentments between Santana and Michael Carabello over lifestyle issues resulted in his departure on bad terms and James Mingo Lewis was hired David Brown also left due to substance abuse problems. A South American tour was cut short in Lima, Peru.In January 1972, Santana, Schon, Escovedo, and Lewis joined former Band of Gypsys drummer, Buddy Miles, for a concert at Hawaii’s Diamond Head Crater, which was recorded for the album Carlos Santana & Buddy Miles! Live!. Santanas next album Caravanserai was. Released in 1972, and marked a change in musical direction towards jazz fusion. In 1972, Santana also became interested in the pioneering fusion band The Mahavishnu Orchestra and its guitarist, John McLaughlin. Aware of Santana’s interest in meditation, McLaughlin introduced Santana, and his wife Deborah, to his guru, Sri Chinmoy. Chinmoy accepted them as disciples in 1973. Santana was given the name Devadip, meaning “The lamp, light and eye of God”. Santana and McLaughlin recorded an album together, Love, Devotion, Surrender (1973) with members of Santana and The Mahavishnu Orchestra, along with percussionist Don Alias and organist Larry Young, both of whom had made appearances, along with McLaughlin, on Miles Davis’ classic 1969 album Bitches Brew.

In 1973, having obtained legal rights to the band’s name, Carlos Santana, formed a new version of the band with Armando Peraza and Chepito Areas on percussion, Doug Rauch on bass, Michael Shrieve on drums, and Tom Coster and Richard Kermode on keyboards. Santana also recruited jazz vocalist Leon Thomas for a tour in Japan on July 3 and 4, 1973, which was recorded for the live, sprawling, high-energy triple vinyl LP fusion album Lotus. In 1973 The group recorded Welcome which further reflected Santana’s interests in jazz fusion and his increasing commitment to the spiritual life of Sri Chinmoy.A collaboration with John Coltrane’s widow, Alice Coltrane, Illuminations (1974), followed. Featuring avant-garde esoteric free jazz, Eastern Indian and classical influences with other ex-Miles Davis sidemen Jack DeJohnette and Dave Holland. This was followed by the album Borboletta, which was released in 1974. Shrieve played on their albums from 1969–1974. When he was 20, Shrieve was one of the youngest musicians to perform at Woodstock in 1969. His drum solo during “Soul Sacrifice” in the Woodstock film has been described as “electrifying”.

Shrieve left the original Santana band to pursue solo projects. He moved to London, England to record the 1976 album Automatic Man with guitarist Pat Thrall, bass guitarist Doni Harvey and keyboardist Todd Cochran (billed as Bayete). While in London Shrieve was part of the fusion supergroup Go with Stomu Yamashta, Steve Winwood, Al Di Meola and Klaus Schulze, releasing two studio albums Go (1976) and Go Too (1977) and the live album Go Live from Paris (1976). He played in the band Hagar Schon Aaronson Shrieve (with Sammy Hagar, Neal Schon, and Kenny Aaronson). Later, he played drums on (former Supertramp member) Roger Hodgson’s first solo album, In the Eye of the Storm. Between 1979 amd 1984, Shrieve collaborated as a percussionist in Richard Wahnfried, a side project of Klaus Schulze (another drummer turned electronic composer) while recording with Schulze his own first “solo” album of electronic music, Transfer Station Blue, in 1984.

Shrieve was also credited for playing percussion on the 1980 album Emotional Rescue by The Rolling Stones and in 1984, he played on Mick Jagger’s She’s the Boss album. When Jagger, Nile Rodgers and Shrieve were mixing the album at The Power Station (now Avatar Studios) in New York City. In 1997, Shrieve joined former Santana musicians Neal Schon, Gregg Rolie, José “Chepito” Areas, Alphonso Johnson, and Michael Carabello to record Abraxas Pool.Shrive has also collaborated with David Beal, Andy Summers, Steve Roach, Jonas Hellborg, Buckethead, Douglas September, and others. He has served as a session player on albums by Todd Rundgren and Jill Sobule. In 2004, Shrive appeared on the track “The Modern Divide” on the Revolution Void album Increase the Dosage.  Shrieve also plays in a fusion jazz group, Spellbinder, at The White Rabbit, Seattle, with Danny Godinez, Joe Doria, John Fricke, and Farko Dosumov and has composed music for several films, most notably Paul Mazursky’s Tempest and Apollo 13. In 1998 Carlos Santana, alongside the classic Santana lineup of their first two albums, was inducted as an individual, into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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