Glen Campbell

American singer, songwriter, musician, television host, and actor Glen Campbell sadly passed awayAugust 8, 2017. He was born April 22, 1936 IN in Billstown, near Delight in Pike County, Arkansas, to John Wesley (a sharecropper of Scottish ancestry) and Carrie Dell (Stone) Campbell. He started playing guitar as a youth and he credited his uncle Boo for teaching him that instrument. In 1954, Campbell moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to join his uncle’s band, known as Dick Bills and the Sandia Mountain Boys. He also appeared there on his uncle’s radio show and on K Circle B Time, the local children’s program on KOB television. In 1958, Campbell formed his own band, the Western Wranglers.

In 1960, Campbell moved to Los Angeles to become a session musician and joined the Champs. Campbell had worked at publishing company American Music, writing songs and recording demos. Because of these demos Campbell was soon working as a session musician and became part of a group of studio musicians later known as the Wrecking Crew. Campbell played on recordings by Bobby Darin, Ricky Nelson, Dean Martin, Nat King Cole, the Monkees, Nancy Sinatra, Merle Haggard, Jan and Dean, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Ronnie Dove, and Phil Spector. In 1961, he left the Champs and sgned with Crest Records, a subsidiary of American Music and released The song, “Turn Around, Look at Me”. Campbell also formed the Gee Cees with former bandmembers from the Champs, performing at the Crossbow Inn in Van Nuys. They released the instrumental “Buzz Saw”. In 1962, Campbell released the songs “Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry” and “Kentucky Means Paradise”. In 1964 Campbell began to appear on television as a regular on Star Route, hosted by Rod Cameron, ABC’s Shindig!, and Hollywood Jamboree. he was a touring member of the Beach Boys, filling in for Brian Wilson, playing bass guitar and singing falsetto harmonies. In 1965, he released the song  “Universal Soldier” and played guitar on the Beach Boys’ 1966 album Pet Sounds, among other recordings. He also played bass for Ricky Nelson on a Far East tour.

Between 1966 and 1967, he collaborated with producer Al de Lort on the songs “Burning Bridges”, “Gentle on My Mind”, By the Time I Get to Phoenix”, “I Wanna Live” and “Wichita Lineman”. Campbell also won four Grammy Awards for his performances on “Gentle on My Mind” and “By the Time I Get to Phoenix”. In 1967, Campbell was also the uncredited lead vocalist on “My World Fell Down” by Sagittarius. He also sung the 1969 song “True Grit” by composer Elmer Bernstein and lyricist Don Black, and co-starred in the movie True Grit, receiving nominations for the Academy Award for Best Song and the Golden Globe for Best Original Song and a nomination for Most Promising Newcomer.  His biggest hits in the late 1960s were: “By the Time I Get to Phoenix”, “Wichita Lineman”, “Galveston”, and “Where’s the Playground Susie”. After he hosted a 1968 summer replacement for television’s The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour variety show, Campbell hosted his own weekly variety show, The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, from  1969 to 1972. Where he hosted major names in music on his show, including The Beatles (on film), David Gates, Bread, The Monkees, Neil Diamond, Linda Ronstadt, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Roger Miller, and Mel Tillis. At the height of his popularity, a 1970 biography by Freda Kramer, The Glen Campbell Story, was published. An album of mainly Webb-penned compositions, Reunion: The Songs of Jimmy Webb, was also released in 1974. 

in 1974 Campbell co-starred in a made-for-television movie, Strange Homecoming (1974), with Robert Culp and up-and-coming teen idol, Leif Garrett. He hosted a number of television specials, including 1976’s Down Home, Down Under with Olivia Newton-John. He co-hosted the American Music Awards from 1976–78 and headlined the 1979 NBC special Glen Campbell: Back to Basics with guest-stars Seals and Crofts and Brenda Lee. He was a guest on many network talk and variety shows, including: Donny & Marie, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, Cher, the Redd Foxx Comedy Hour, The Merv Griffin Show, The Midnight Special with Wolfman Jack, DINAH!, Evening at Pops with Arthur Fiedler and The Mike Douglas Show. In the mid-1970s, he had more hits with “Rhinestone Cowboy”, “Southern Nights”, “Sunflower” and “Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.)”. Rhinestone Cowboy” continues to be used in TV shows and films, including Desperate Housewives, Daddy Day Care, and High School High. It was the inspiration for the 1984 Dolly Parton/Sylvester Stallone movie Rhinestone. From 1971 to 1983, Campbell was the celebrity host of the Los Angeles Open, an annual professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour.

From 1982 to 1983, he hosted The Glen Campbell Music Show and also made a cameo appearance in the 1980 Clint Eastwood movie Any Which Way You Can, for which he recorded the title song. In 1991, he provided the voice of the Elvis Presley sound-alike rooster Chanticleer in the Don Bluth film Rock-a-Doodle. In 1999, Campbell was featured on VH-1’s Behind the Music, A&E Network’s Biography in 2001. Campbell ranked 29th on CMT’s 40 Greatest Men of Country Music in 2003. Campbell also made a techno/pop version of Rhinestone Cowboy in 2002 with UK artists Rikki & Daz and went to the top 10 in the UK with the dance version and related music video. In 2005, Campbell was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. in 2008 Campbell released his new album, Meet Glen Campbell Which covered tracks by artists such as Travis, U2, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Jackson Browne, Foo Fighters and a cover of Green Day’s “Good Riddance (Time of Your Life). Musicians from Cheap Trick and Jellyfish also contributed to the album. In 2011 Campbell released the album Ghost on the Canvas with contributions from Paul Westerberg (writer of the title track), The Wallflowers singer Jakob Dylan, Chris Isaak, Rick Nielsen and Billy Corgan of the Smashing Pumpkins.

 

Sadly in 2011 Glen Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s so he embarked on a final “Goodbye Tour”, with three of his children joining him in his backup band. His final show was in 2012 in Napa, California. After the end of the tour, Campbell entered the studio in his home town Nashville to record what would be his final album, Adiós, Campbell recorded, “I’m Not Gonna Miss You”, which is featured in the 2014 documentary, Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me, In 2015 Campbell and fellow songwriter Julian Raymond were nominated for Best Original Song at the 87th Academy Awards. In 2016, during the 10th Annual ACM Honors, Keith Urban, Blake Shelton and others performed a medley of Glen Campbell’s songs in tribute to him. His wife Kim Campbell accepted the Career Achievement Award on his behalf. In April 2017, Campbell’s final album, Adiós, was announced, featuring twelve songs from his final 2012–13 sessions. The album was released on June 9, 2017.

During his 50 years in show business, Campbell released more than 70 albums. He sold 45 million records and accumulated 12 RIAA gold albums, four platinum albums, and one double-platinum album. He placed a total of 80 different songs on either the Billboard Country Chart, Billboard Hot 100, or Adult Contemporary Chart, of which 29 made the top 10 and of which nine reached number one on at least one of those charts. Campbell made history in 1967 by winning four Grammys in the country and pop categories. For “Gentle on My Mind”, he received two awards in country and western, “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and received two awards in PoP. Three of his early hits later won Grammy Hall of Fame Awards (2000, 2004, 2008), while Campbell himself won the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He owns trophies for Male Vocalist of the Year from both the Country Music Association (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), and took the CMA’s top award as 1968 Entertainer of the Year. Wichita Lineman” (1968) was also selected as one of the greatest songs of the 20th century by Mojo magazine in 1997 and by Blender in 2001.

 

Joe Orton

English playwright and author Joe Orton, was tragically killed 9 August 1967. He was Born 1 January 1933. His public career was short but prolific, lasting from 1964 until his death in1967. During this brief period he shocked, outraged, and amused audiences with his scandalous black comedies. The adjective Ortonesque is sometimes used to refer to work characterised by a similarly dark yet farcical cynicism. He attended a writing course at Clark’s College in Leicester from 1945 to 1947.He then began working as a junior clerk on £3 a week and became interested in performing in the theatre around 1949 and joined a number of different dramatic societies, including the prestigious Leicester Dramatic Society. While working on amateur productions he was also determined to improve his appearance and physique, buying bodybuilding courses, taking elocution lessons, and trying to redress his lack of education and culture. He applied for a scholarship at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in November 1950. He was accepted, and left the East Midlands for London. His entrance into RADA was delayed until May 1951 by appendicitis.

Orton met Kenneth Halliwell at RADA in 1951 and moved into a West Hampstead flat with him and two other students. Halliwell was seven years older than Orton and They quickly formed a strong relationship and became lovers.After graduating, both Orton and Halliwell went into regional repertory work: Orton spent four months in Ipswich and Halliwell in Llandudno, Wales. Both returned to London and became writers. They collaborated on a number of unpublished novels but had little success. The rejection of the novel The Last Days of Sodom, in 1957 led them to solo works.

From 1957–1959, Orton and Halliwell worked at Cadbury’s and moved into a small, austere flat at 25 Noel Road inIslington in 1959. Orton and his friends would often amuse themselves with pranks and hoaxes. Orton created the alter ego Edna Welthorpe, an elderly theatre snob, whom he would later revive to stir controversy over his plays. Orton chose the name as an allusion to Terence Rattigan’s “Aunt Edna”, Rattigan’s archetypal playgoer. They also stole books from the local library and modify the cover art or the blurbs before returning them to the library. A volume of poems by John Betjeman, for example, was returned to the library with a new dustjacket featuring a photograph of a nearly naked, heavily tattooed, middle-aged man. The couple decorated their flat with many of the prints. They were eventually discovered and prosecuted for stealing and damaging library books in May 1962 which was reported in Daily Mirror as “Gorilla in the Roses”.

They were sentenced to prison for six months (released September 1962) and fined £262, which they felt was unduly harsh “because we were queers”. However, prison would be a crucial formative experience for Orton; the isolation from Halliwell allowed him to see the corruptness, priggishness, and double standards of a purportedly liberal society in Britain. The book covers that Orton and Halliwell vandalised have subsequently become a valued part of the Islington Local History Centre collection and Some are exhibited in the Islington Museum. Orton began to write plays in the early 1960s. He wrote the Ruffian In 1963 which was broadcast on Radio and substantially rewritten for the stage in 1966, by which time he had completed his next play Entertaining Mr Sloane, Which premiered at the New Arts Theatre on 6 May 1964, And garnered critical praise from playwright Terence Rattigan, who invested £3,000 to ensure its survival and was performed at the Wyndham’s Theatre in the West End and the Queen’s Theatre. It tied for first in the Variety Critics’ Poll for “Best New Play” Orton also came second for “Most Promising Playwright.” And was performed in New York, Spain, Israel and Australia, as well as being made into a film and a television play.

Orton’s next performed work was Loot. Originally entitled Funeral Games, it is a wild parody of detective fiction, adding farce and jabs at established ideas on death, the police, religion, and justice. Despite being heavily rewritten Loot subsequently opened to scathing reviews in Brighton, Oxford, Bournemouth, Manchester, and Wimbledon Discouraged, Orton and Halliwell went on an 80-day holiday in Tangier, Morocco. Loot was revived in 1966 and Orton edited The play raising the tempo and improving the characters’ interactions. Additional cuts further improved Loot and It premiered in London on 27 September 1966, to rave reviews, before moving to the Criterion Theatre before winning several awards and firmly establishing Orton’s fame sadly though Loot flopped on Broadway. Orton next wrote What the Butler Saw, revised The Ruffian on the Stair and The Erpingham Camp for the stage as a double called Crimes of Passion. He also wrote Funeral Games; and the screenplay “Up Against It” for the Beatles, worked on What the Butler Saw and wrote “The Good and Faithful Servant”, which was Orton’s take on The Bacchae, and was broadcast 1966 as the ‘pride’ segment in the series Seven Deadly Sins. Orton rewrote Funeral Games as a segment for the series, The Seven Deadly Virtues, Which dealt with charity—especially Christian charity—in a confusion of adultery and murder, which was broadcast by Yorkshire Television in 1968

Unfortunately During 1967 whilst Orton was working hard, energised and happy; Halliwell was becoming increasingly depressed, argumentative, and plagued with mystery ailments, culminating in 9 August 1967 with Orton’s brutal murder by Halliwell at his home in Noël Road, Islington, London, before Halliwell himself committed suicide with an overdose of 22 Nembutol tablets washed down with Grapefruit Juice. What The Butler Saw subsequently debuted posthumously in the West End in 1969 opening at the the Queen’s Theatre with Sir Ralph Richardson, Coral Browne, Stanley Baxter, and Hayward Morse to rave reviews.

Jerry Garcia (Gateful Dead)

The late great Jerry Garcia, musician with American rock band The Grateful Dead was Born 1st August 1942. formed in 1965 in the San Francisco Bay Area. The band were known for their unique and eclectic style, which fused elements of rock, folk, bluegrass, blues, reggae, country, improvisational jazz, psychedelia, and space rock, and long musical improvisation. “Their music,” writes Lenny Kaye, “touches on ground that most other groups don’t even know exists.” These various influences were distilled into a diverse and psychedelic whole that made the Grateful Dead “the pioneering Godfathers of the jam band world.” They were ranked 57th in the issue The Greatest Artists of all Time by Rolling Stone magazine. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 and their Barton Hall Concert at Cornell University was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry.The founding members of the Grateful Dead were Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals), Bob Weir (guitar, vocals), Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (keyboards, harmonica, vocals), Phil Lesh (bass, vocals), and Bill Kreutzmann (drums). Lesh was the last member to join the Warlocks before they became the Grateful Dead; he replaced Dana Morgan Jr., who had played bass for a few gigs.

With the exception of McKernan, who died in 1973, the core of the band stayed together for its entire 30-year history.Phil Lesh and Jerry Garcia were brought together by Gert Chiarito in 1964 to perform on The Midnight Special. The Grateful Dead began their career as the Warlocks, a group formed in early 1965 from the remnants of a jug band called Mother McCree’s Uptown Jug Champions, although The band changed its name after finding out that another band of the same name had signed a recording contract. The name “Grateful Dead” was chosen from a dictionary, The definition being that there was “the soul of a dead person, or his angel, showing gratitude to someone who, as an act of charity, arranged their burial.”One of the group’s earliest major performances in 1967 was at the Avalon Ballroom by the San Francisco Hare Krishna temple. The Grateful Dead performed at the event along with the Hare Krishna founder Bhaktivedanta Swami, poet Allen Ginsberg, bands Moby Grape and Big Brother and the Holding Company with Janis Joplin, donating proceeds to the Krishna temple. The band’s first LP, The Grateful Dead, was released in 1967. 1970 included tour dates in New Orleans, Louisiana, where the band performed at The Warehouse for two nights.

Mickey Hart quit the Grateful Dead in February 1971, leaving Kreutzmann once again as the sole percussionist. Hart rejoined the Grateful Dead for good in October 1974. Tom “TC” Constanten was added as a second keyboardist from 1968 to 1970, while Pigpen also played various percussion instruments and sang. Following the Grateful Dead’s “Europe ’72″ tour, Pigpen’s health had deteriorated to the point that he could no longer tour with the band. His final concert appearance was June 17, 1972 at the Hollywood Bowl, in Los Angeles and he died in March, 1973 of complications from alcohol abuse. The Grateful Dead formed their own record group, Grateful Dead Records & Later that year, they released their next studio album, the jazz influenced Wake of the Flood. It became their biggest commercial success thus far. During the late 1970s the band went back to the studio, and the next year released another album, Grateful Dead from the Mars Hotel. Not long after that album’s release however, the Grateful Dead decided to take a hiatus from live touring so that its members could focus on their solo careers. This hiatus was short lived, though, as they resumed touring in 1976, and released another album Terrapin Station in 1977.

During the 1980s the bands sound transformed. Sadly though Garcia’s health began to decline. His drug habits caused him to lose his liveliness on stage. After kicking his drug habit in 1985, he slipped into a diabetic coma for several days in July 1986. After he recovered, the band released In the Dark in 1987, which resulted as their best selling studio album release, and also produced their only top-10 chart single, Touch of Grey. Inspired by Garcia’s improved health and a successful album, the band’s energy and chemistry peaked in the late 1980s and 1990. Performances were vigorous and as a result, every show exceeded its maximum audience capacity. Sadly The band’s “high time” came to a sudden halt when Mydland died after the summer tour in 1990. So Vince Welnick, joined on keyboards and vocals and Bruce Hornsby joined the band as the pianist and vocals on September 15, 1990.

Fans of the Grateful Dead, the “Deadheads” are known for their dedication and follow the band from concert to concert for years. From 2003 to 2009 former members of the Grateful Dead, along with other musicians, toured as The Dead and The Other Ones. There are many contemporary incarnations of the Dead, with the most prominent touring acts being Furthur and Phil Lesh & Friends and although Jerry Garcia passed away 9 August 1995, the music lives on and the Grateful Dead remain popular among “Deadheads”.

Whitney Houston

the late, great singer, actress an model Whitney Houston was Born 9th August in 1963 in Newark, New Jersey. Houston started performing at 11 as a soloist in the junior gospel choir at the New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, where she also learned to play the piano. When Houston was a teenager, she attended Mount Saint Dominic Academy, a Catholic girls’ high school in Caldwell, New Jersey, where she met her best friend Robyn Crawford, whom she described as the “sister she never had”. While Houston was still in school, her mother continued to teach her how to sing. Houston was also exposed to and influenced by, the music of Chaka Khan, Gladys Knight, and Roberta Flack. Houston spent some of her teenage years touring nightclubs where her mother Cissy was performing, and she would occasionally get on stage and perform with her. In 1977, at age 14, she became a backup singer on the Michael Zager Band’s single “Life’s a Party”. In 1978, Houston sang background vocals on Chaka Khan’s hit single “I’m Every Woman”, a song she would later turn into a larger hit for herself on her monster-selling The Bodyguard soundtrack album. She also sang back-up on albums by Lou Rawls and Jermaine Jackson.

In the 1980s, Houston worked as a fashion model after a photographer saw her at Carnegie Hall singing with her mother. She appeared in the magazines Seventeen, Glamour, Cosmopolitan and Young Miss,Her striking looks and girl-next-door charm made her one of the most sought after teen models and While modeling, Houston also recording was a duet with Teddy Pendergrass entitled “Hold Me” which appeared on his album, Love Language (1984). The Song also appeared on her debut album which was released in February 198 and also included the soulful ballad “You Give Good Love” Which did wellon the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and reached No. 1 on the Hot R&B chart.Houston promoted the album by touring US nightclubs AND performing on late-night television talk shows. Houston released The jazzy ballad “Saving All My Love for You” next and it became Houston’s first No. 1 single in both the US and the UK. The final single, “Greatest Love of All“, became Houston’s biggest hit thus far and Houston became No. 1 artist of the year and her self titled album was the No. 1 album of the year on the 1986 Billboard year-end charts and the best-selling debut album by a solo artist.Houston then embarked on her world tour, Greatest Love Tour. At the 1986 Grammy Awards, Houston was nominated for three awards including Album of the Year. She was not eligible for the Best New Artist category due to her previous hit R&B duet recording with Teddy Pendergrass in 1984. She won her first Grammy award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female for “Saving All My Love for You”. Houston’s performance of the song during the Grammy telecast later earned her an Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program. During 1986 &1987 Houston won seven American Music Awards and an MTV Video Music Award. The song “Greatest Love of All” received a Record of the Year nomination. Houston’s debut album is listed as one of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and on The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s Definitive 200 list.

Houston’s second album, Whitney, was released in June 1987 debuting at number one on the Billboard 200 albums chart, Houston became the first artist to enter the albums chart at number one in both the US and UK. The album featured the singles, “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)“, “Didn’t We Almost Have It All”, “So Emotional”, and “Where Do Broken Hearts Go” which all peaked at number one on the US Hot 100 chart, giving her a total of seven consecutive number one hits, breaking the record of six previously shared by The Beatles and The Bee Gees. Houston became the first female artist to have Four number one singles on one album which was also certified 9× Platinum in the US and has sold a total of 20 million copies worldwide. In 2009, the Guinness World Records cited her as the most-awarded female act of all-time. Houston was one of the world’s best-selling music artists, having sold over 170 million albums, singles and videos worldwide. She released seven studio albums and three movie soundtrack albums, all of which have diamond, multi-platinum, platinum or gold certification. Houston’s crossover appeal on the popular music charts, as well as her prominence on MTV, starting with her video for “How Will I Know”, influenced several African American female artists to follow in her footsteps. Houston is the only artist to chart seven consecutive No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hits. She is the second artist behind Elton John and the only female artist to have two number-one Billboard 200 Album awards (formerly “Top Pop Album”) on the Billboard magazine year-end charts. Houston’s 1985 debut album Whitney Houston was named Rolling Stone’s best album of 1986 Ranking at 254 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Her second studio album Whitney (1987) became the first album by a female artist to debut at number one on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

Houston’s first acting role was as the star of the feature film The Bodyguard (1992). The film’s original soundtrack won the 1994 Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Its lead single “I Will Always Love You“, became the best-selling single by a female artist in music history. With the album, Houston became the first act (solo or group, male or female) to sell more than a million copies of an album within a single week period under Nielsen SoundScan system. The album makes her the top female act in the top 10 list of the best-selling albums of all time, at number four. Houston continued to star in movies and contribute to their soundtracks, including the films Waiting to Exhale (1995) and The Preacher’s Wife (1996) which became the best-selling gospel album in history. Her sad demise left fans around the world in shock. The I Will Always Love You and Saving All My Love singer won multiple Grammys including album and record of the year, selling millions of albums and singles worldwide. She also carried her success into the film industry, appearing in hit movies including The Bodyguard. Sadly Whitney Houston, tagically died on the 11th February 2012, at the age of 48.

International Day of the world’s Indigenous people

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s indigenous population. This event also recognizes the achievements and contributions that indigenous people make to improve world issues such as environmental protection. It was first pronounced by the General Assembly of the United Nations in December 1994, marking the day of the first meeting of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Subcommission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights, in 1982.

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples was first pronounced by the General Assembly of the United Nations in December 1994, to be celebrated every year during the first International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People (1995–2004). In 2004, the Assembly proclaimed a Second International Decade, from 2005–2015, with the theme of “A Decade for Action and Dignity”. People from different nations are encouraged to participate in observing the day to spread the UN’s message on indigenous peoples. Activities may include educational forums and classroom activities to gain an appreciation and a better understanding of indigenous peoples.

By resolution 49/214 of 23 December 1994, the United Nations General Assembly decided that the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People shall be observed on 9 August every year during the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous People. The date marks the day of the first meeting, in 1982, of the UN Working Group on Indigenous Populations of the Subcommission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights.

Artwork by Rebang Dewan, a Chakma boy from Bangladesh, was chosen as the visual identifier of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. It has also been seen on material to promote the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. It features two ears of green leaves facing each other and cradling a globe resembling planet earth. Within the globe is a picture of a handshake (two different hands) in the middle and above the handshake is a landscape background. The handshake and the landscape background are encapsulated by blue at the top and bottom within the globe.