Phil Lynott (Thin Lizzy)

Irish musician, singer and songwriter Phil Lynott was born 20 August 1949 in Hallam Hospital (now Sandwell General Hospital) in West Bromwich, England, and christened at St. Edwards Church in Selly Park, Birmingham. His parents were Philomena Lynott and Cecil Parris. When he was four years old, Philip went to live with his grandmother, Sarah Lynott, in Crumlin, Dublin. His mother stayed in Manchester, and later took over the management of the Clifton Grange Hotel in Whalley Range with her partner, Dennis Keeley. The hotel, nicknamed “The Biz”, became popular with showbusiness entertainers, and was later referred to in a song on Thin Lizzy’s debut album. Lynott had a happy childhood growing up in Dublin, and was a popular character at school and fronted several bands as a lead vocalist, most notably Skid Row alongside Gary Moore, before learning the bass guitar and forming hard rock band Thin Lizzy in Dublin in 1969.

Two of the founding members of Thin Lizzy, drummer Brian Downey and bass guitarist and lead vocalist Phil Lynott, met while still in school. Lynott led the group throughout their recording career of twelve studio albums, writing most of the material. Thin Lizzy’s most successful songs, “Whiskey in the Jar” (a traditional Irish ballad), “Jailbreak” and “The Boys Are Back in Town”,and  “Waiting for an Alibi”were all major international hits thanks to the combination of Lynott’s vocal and songwriting skills and the use of dual lead guitars. Lynott, Composed or co-composed of almost all of the band’s songs, and was a more insightful and intelligent writer than many of his ilk, preferring slice-of-life working-class dramas of love and hate influenced by Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, and Bruce Springsteen. Van Morrison, Jeff Beck and Jimi Hendrix were major influences during the early days of the band, and later influences included the pioneering twin lead guitars found in Wishbone Ash and American artists Little Feat and Bob Seger.

Thin Lizzy featured a number of critically acclaimed guitarists throughout their history, with Downey and Lynott as the rhythm section, on the drums and bass guitar. As well as being multiracial, the band drew their members not only from both sides of the Irish border but also from both the Catholic and Protestant communities during The Troubles. Their music reflects a wide range of influences, including blues, soul music, psychedelic rock, and traditional Irish folk music, but is generally classified as hard rock or sometimes heavy metal. Rolling Stone magazine describes the band as distinctly hard rock, “far apart from the braying mid-70s metal pack”.

Lynott also embarked upon a solo career, published two books of poetry, and after Thin Lizzy disbanded, he assembled and fronted the band Grand Slam until 1985. He subsequently had major UK success with Moore with the song “Out in the Fields”, followed by the minor hit “Nineteen”. Lynott sadly died 4 January 1986, following this tragedy, various incarnations of the band emerged over the years based initially around guitarists Scott Gorham and John Sykes, though Sykes left the band in 2009. Gorham later continued with a new line-up including Downey. In 2012, Gorham and Downey decided against recording new material as Thin Lizzy so a new band, Black Star Riders, was formed to tour and produce new releases such as their debut album All Hell Breaks Loose. Thin Lizzy plan to reunite for occasional concerts and Lynott remains a popular figure in the rock world, and in 2005, a statue to his memory was erected in Dublin.

Robert Plant (Led Zeppelin, Honeydrippers, Band of Joy

Former Vocalist with Rock band Led Zeppelin and successful solo artist Robert Plant, was born 20th August 1948. Led Zeppelin are widely considered to be one of the most successful, innovative and influential rock groups in the history of music and were formed in 1968 after former Yardbirds Guitarist Jimmy Page recruited vocalist Robert Plant, drummer John Bonham, and John Paul Jones. The name Led Zeppelin stemmed from an old joke by Keith Moon and John Entwistle, of “The Who”, and Page stuck with that name to use for his new band. The name was subsequently changed to “Led Zeppelin”, to avoid a mispronunciation of “Leed Zeppelin.”Jimmy Page had a very specific idea in mind as to what he wanted Led Zeppelin to be, and wanted to add acoustic textures. Zeppelin’s sound became a marriage of blues, hard rock and acoustic music topped with heavy choruses – a combination that had never been done back in the 1960′s. Led Zeppelin’s sound has since become a prototype for countless rock bands ever since, and was one of the major driving forces behind the rock sound of the 1970′s.

Led Zeppelin released relatively few singles, preferring their albums to be viewed as indivisible, whole listening experiences, helping to promote the concept of album-orientated rock. Their first two albums, with their heavy, guitar-driven blues rock sound, led to Led Zeppelin being regularly cited as one of the progenitors of heavy metal and hard rock, even though the band’s individualistic style drew from varied sources and transcends any single music genre. Their next two albums incorporated wider musical influences, particularly from folk music; the tracks “Stairway to Heaven“, and “Kashmir” are among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and cemented the status of the group as “superstars”.

Led Zeppelin broke up in 1980 following the death of drummer John Bonham, and Page refused to touch a guitar out of sadness for the loss of his friend Bonham, After the break up , Plant briefly considered teaching, but nevertheless embarked on a successful solo career beginning with Pictures at Eleven in 1982, followed by 1983′s The Principle of Moments. Popular tracks from this period include “Big Log” (a Top 20 hit in 1983), “In the Mood” (1983), “Little by Little” (from 1985′s Shaken ‘n’ Stirred), “Far Post” “Tall Cool One” and “I Believe”, another song written for and dedicated to his late son, Karac. In 1984, Plant formed a short-lived all-star group with Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck called The Honeydrippers, who had a No. 3 hit with a remake of the Phil Phillips’ tune, “Sea of Love” and a followup hit with a cover of Roy Brown’s “Rockin’ at Midnight”.

Although Plant avoided performing Led Zeppelin songs through much of this period (he occasionally would improvise his unique Zeppelin screams into his set), his tours in 1983 (with drummer Phil Collins) and 1985 were very successful, often performing to sold-out arena-sized venues. Plant and Page occasionally collaborated on various projects, including The Honeydrippers: Volume One album in 1984. In the spring 2 years later Robert performed at the Birmingham Heart Beat Charity Concert 1986. The pair again worked together in the studio on the 1988 Page solo effort, Outrider, and in the same year Page contributed to Plant’s album Now and Zen. Also, on 15 May 1988 Plant appeared with Page as a member of Led Zeppelin (and in his own right as a solo artist) at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert. Plant released the solo album Mighty Rearranger, and In 2007, Plant released Raising Sand, an album produced by T-Bone Burnett with American bluegrass soprano Alison Krauss, which won the 2009 Grammy Award for Album of the Year at the 51st Grammy Awards. Page also released “Band of Joy” in 2010 featuring the song “Little Angel Dance” and Plant’s latest album “Lullaby and the Ceaseless Roar” was released in 2014.

Throughout their career, Led Zeppelin also collected many honours and awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006. Among the band’s awards are an American Music Award in 2005, and the Polar Music Prize in 2006. Led Zeppelin were the recipient of a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005, and four of their recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. They have been awarded five Diamond albums, as well as fourteen Multi-Platinum albums, four Platinum albums and one Gold album in the United States, while in the UK they have five Multi-Platinum albums, six Platinum albums, one Gold album and four Silver albums.With a career spanning more than 40 years, Plant is regarded as one of the most significant singers in the history of rock music, and has influenced contemporaries and later singers such as Freddie Mercury and Axl Rose. In 2006, heavy metal magazine Hit Parader named Plant the “Greatest Metal Vocalist of All Time”. In 2009, Plant was voted “the greatest voice in rock” in a poll conducted by Planet Rock. In 2011, Plant was also first place of the Rolling Stone magazine’s “Best Lead Singers of All Time”, and was also honoured as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for his services to popular music in 2009. The band are ranked number one on VH1′s 100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock and Classic Rock’s “50 Best Live Acts of All Time”. They were awarded an Ivor Novello Award for “Outstanding Contribution to British Music” in 1977, as well as a “Lifetime Achievement Award” at the 42nd Annual Ivor Novello awards ceremony in 1997. The band were honoured with the “Best Live Act” prize for their one-off reunion at MOJO Awards 2008, where they were described as the “greatest rock and roll band of all time”.

Kraftwerk

Ralf Hütter, One of the founder members of Innovative Pioneering German Electronic Group Kraftwerk was born on 20th August in 1946. Kraftwerk , (meaning power plant or power station) are an influential electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. The group was formed by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider in 1970, and was fronted by them until Schneider’s departure in 2008. The signature Kraftwerk sound combines driving, repetitive rhythms with catchy melodies, mainly following a Western Classical style of harmony, with a minimalistic and strictly electronic instrumentation.Kraftwerk Were formed by Florian Schneider (flutes, synthesizers, violin) and Ralf Hütter (organ, synthesizers) who met as students at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf in the late 1960s, participating in the German experimental music and art scene of the time, which the Melody Maker jokingly dubbed “krautrock”. The duo originally performed together as part of the band Organisation. Organisation released one album, Tone Float in 1969, and split shortly afterwards.

Schneider became interested in synthesizers And acquired one in 1970. While visiting an exhibition about visual artists Gilbert and George, they saw “two men wearing suits and ties, claiming to bring art into everyday life. The same year, Hütter and Schneider start bringing everyday life into art and form Kraftwerk”. During the 1970’s Hütter and Schneider worked with around a half-dozen other musicians during the preparations for and the recording of three albums and sporadic live appearances, including guitarist Michael Rother and drummer Klaus Dinger, who left to form Neu! Schneider, played the flute; the violin and guitar, all processed through a varied array of electronic devices. Hütter, who left the band for eight months, played synthesizer and keyboards (including Farfisa organ and electric piano).

Their first three albums were free-form experimental music without the pop hooks or the more disciplined song structure of later work. Kraftwerk, released in 1970, and Kraftwerk 2, released in 1972, were mostly exploratory musical improvisations played on a variety of traditional instruments including guitar, bass, drums, organ, flute, and violin. Post-production modifications were used to distort the sound of the instruments, particularly audio-tape manipulation and multiple dubbings of one instrument on the same track. Both albums are purely instrumental. Live performances from 1972 to 1973 were made as a duo, using a simple beat-box-type electronic drum machine, with preset rhythms taken from an electric organ. In 1973, Wolfgang Flür joined the group for rehearsals, and they performed on the television show Aspekte.

From 1973, Kraftwerk began using synthesizers and drum machines. Although almost entirely instrumental, the album marks Kraftwerk’s first use of the vocoder. Kraftwerk’s futuristic and robotic sound was influenced by the ‘adrenalized insurgency’ of Detroit artists of the late ’60s such as MC5 and the Stooges. The input, expertise, and influence of producer and engineer Konrad “Conny” Plank was highly significant in the early years of Kraftwerk. Plank worked with members of Kraftwerk, Can, Neu!, Cluster, and Harmonia in 1970s and coproduced the first four Kraftwerk albums. In 1974 Kraftwerk released Autobahn, For which Hütter and Schneider had used newer technology such as the Minimoog and the EMS Synthi AKS, helping give Kraftwerk a newer, “disciplined” sound. Autobahn was a huge success in the US, where it peaked at number 5 in the Billboard top 200, Hütter and Schneider updated their studio, thus lessening their reliance on outside producers. The painter and graphic artist Emil Schult also became a regular collaborator, designing artwork, cowriting lyrics, and accompanying the group on tour.

in 1975 Kraftwerk embarked on a multi-date tour to promote the Autobahn album, a tour which took them to the US, Canada and the UK for the first time. The tour also saw a new, stable, live line-up in the form of a quartet. Hütter and Schneider continued playing keyboard synthesizers such as the Minimoog and ARP Odyssey, with Schneider’s use of flute diminishing. The pair also started singing live for the first time, Schneider processing his voice with a vocoder live. Wolfgang Flür and new recruit Karl Bartos performed on self-built electronic percussion instruments. Bartos also used a Deagan vibraphone on stage. The Hütter-Schneider-Bartos-Flür formation is now regarded as the classic live line-up of Kraftwerk. Emil Schult generally fulfilled the role of tour manager.

Following the 1975 Autobahn tour, Kraftwerk began work on the follow-up album, Radio-Activity (German title: Radio-Aktivität). After further investment in new equipment, the Kling Klang Studio became a fully working recording studio. With Emil Schult working on artwork and lyrics, Kraftwerk began to compose music for the new record. Radio Active Saw Kraftwerk become even more popular in Europe, earning them a gold disc in France. Kraftwerk made videos and performed several European live dates to promote the album. With the release of Autobahn and Radio-Activity, Kraftwerk left behind avant-garde experimentation and moved towards the electronic pop tunes for which they are best known.

In 1976, Kraftwerk toured in support of the Radio-Activity album. David Bowie was among the fans of the record and invited the band to support him on his Station to Station tour. Despite some innovations in touring, Kraftwerk took a break from live performances after the Radio-Activity tour of 1976 and began recording Trans-Europe Express (German: Trans-Europa Express) at the Kling Klang Studio. Hütter and Schneider also met David Bowie at the Kling Klang Studio. A collaboration was mentioned in an interview (Brian Eno) with Hütter, but it never materialised. The release of Trans-Europe Express in March 1977 was marked with an extravagant train journey used as a press conference by EMI France. The album won a disco award in New York later that year.In May 1978 Kraftwerk released The Man-Machine (German: Die Mensch-Maschine), recorded at the Kling Klang Studio and was the first Kraftwerk album where Karl Bartos was cocredited as a songwriter. The cover, produced in black, white and red, was inspired by Russian artist El Lissitzky and the Suprematism movement. Gunther Frohling photographed the group for the cover, a now-iconic image which featured the quartet dressed in red shirts and black ties.

In May 1981 Kraftwerk released Computer World (German: Computerwelt) recorded at Kling Klang Studio between 1978 and 1981. Kraftwerk modifiedthe studio to make it portable so the band could take it on tour. Some of the electronic vocals on Computer World were generated using a Texas Instruments language translator. “Computer Love” was released as a single backed with the Man-Machine track “The Model”. The Model reached number one in the UK and the Man-Machine album became hugely successful in the UK in 1982 as a result.The band’s live set encorporated greater use of vocals and the use of sequencing equipment for both percussion and music. In contrast to their cool and controlled image, the group used sequencers interactively, which allowed for live improvisation. Ironically Kraftwerk did not own a computer at the time of recording Computer World.

In 1981 Kraftwerk embarked on the Computer World tour and effectively packed up their entire Kling Klang studio and took it with themThey also made greater use of live visuals including back-projected slides and films synchronized with the music as the technology developed, the use of hand-held miniaturized instruments during the set (for example, during “Pocket Calculator”), and, perhaps most famously, the use of replica mannequins of themselves to perform on stage during the song “The Robots”.

In 1982 Kraftwerk began work on the album Techno Pop. One of the songs from these recording sessions was “Tour de France”, released in 1983. This song was a reflection of the band’s new-found obsession for cycling. After the physically demanding Computer World tour, Ralf Hütter had been looking for forms of exercise that fitted in with the image of Kraftwerk; subsequently he encouraged the group to become vegetarians and take up cycling. ” the song Tour de France” was also released, this included sounds including bicycle chains, gear mechanisms and the breathing of the cyclist. “aTour de France” was also featured in the 1984 film Breakin’. Sadly During the recording of “Tour de France”, Ralf Hütter was involved in a serious cycling accident. He suffered head injuries and remained in a coma for several days. During 1983 Wolfgang Flür was beginning to spend less time in the studio. Since the band began using sequencers his role as a drummer was becoming less frequent. He preferred to spend his time travelling with his girlfriend. Flür was also experiencing artistic difficulties with the band. After his final work on the 1986 album Electric Café (a.k.a. Techno Pop) he hardly returned to the Kling Klang Studio. In 1987 he left the band and was replaced by Fritz Hilpert.

During 1990 Kraftwerk played a few secret shows in Italy. Karl Bartos left the band shortly afterwards. The next proper tour was in 1991, for the album The Mix. Hütter and Schneider wished to continue the synth-pop quartet style of presentation, and recruited Fernando Abrantes as a replacement for Bartos. Abrantes left the band shortly after though, so long-time Kling Klang Studio sound engineer Henning Schmitz was recruited. In 1997 Kraftwerk appeared at the dance festival Tribal Gathering held in England. In 1998, Kraftwerk also toured the US and Japan Brazil and Argentina. In July 1999 the single “Tour de France” was reissued featuring slightly altered artwork. In 1999 Wolfgang Flür published his autobiography in Germany, Ich war ein Roboter. Later English-language editions of the book were titled Kraftwerk: I Was a Robot. The single “Expo 2000” was released in 1999 and was remixed and re-released as “Expo Remix” in 2000.

In 2003 Kraftwerk released the Tour de France Soundtrack, the first album of new material since 1986’s Electric Café and embarked on an extensive Minimum-Maximum world tour, using four customised Sony VAIO laptop computers, effectively leaving the entire Kling Klang studio at home in Germany. The group also obtained a new set of transparent video panels to replace its four large projection screens. This greatly streamlined the running of all of the group’s sequencing, sound-generating, and visual-display software which replaced manual playing With an interactive control of sequencing equipment. Hütter retained the most manual performance, still playing musical lines by hand on a controller keyboard and singing live vocals. Schneider’s live vocoding had been replaced by software-controlled speech-synthesis techniques. In 2003 the group made a surprising appearance at the MTV European Music Awards in Edinburgh, Scotland, performing “Aerodynamik”. The same year a promotional box set entitled 12345678 (subtitled The Catalogue) was issued, featuring remastered editions of the group’s eight core studio albums, from Autobahn to Tour de France Soundtracks.

in 2005 the band’s first-ever official live album, Minimum-Maximum,was released. compiled during the band’s tour of spring 2004 and containing reworked tracks from existing studio albums, plus a track titled “Planet of Visions” that was a reworking of “Expo 2000”. Kraftwerk also toured Serbia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Turkey, and Greece. and performed at festivals in Norway, Ireland, the Czech Republic, Spain, Belgium, and Germany. In 2008 the group played three shows in US cities Minneapolis, Milwaukee, and Denver, and were a coheadliner at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. They also performed in Ireland, Poland, Ukraine, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore.The touring quartet consisted of Ralf Hütter, Henning Schmitz, Fritz Hilpert, and video technician Stefan Pfaffe, who became an official member in 2008. Original member Florian Schneider was absent from the lineup. Hütter stated that he was working on other projects. In 2008 Florian Schneider also left Kraftwerk. In 2009, Kraftwerk performed concerts with special 3D background graphics in Wolfsburg, Germany; Manchester, UK; and Randers, Denmark. Members of the audience were able to watch this multimedia part of the show with 3D glasses, which were given out. During the Manchester concert (part of the 2009 Manchester International Festival) four members of the GB cycling squad (Jason Kenny, Ed Clancy, Jamie Staff and Geraint Thomas) rode around the Velodrome while the band performed “Tour de France”.

The group also played Bestival 2009 on the Isle of Wight and finally released The Catalogue box set on containing all eight remastered CDs in cardboard slipcases, as well as LP-sized booklets of photographs and artwork for each individual album. Ralf Hütter suggested that a second boxed set of their first three experimental albums—Kraftwerk, Kraftwerk 2 and Ralf and Florian could be released. Kraftwerk also released an iOS app called Kraftwerk Kling Klang Machine. The Lenbach House in Munich exhibited some Kraftwerk 3-D pieces in Autumn 2011. Kraftwerk performed three concerts to open the exhibit. In 2012 Kraftwerk played at Ultra Music Festival in Miami and The Museum of Modern Art of New York organized an exhibit titled Kraftwerk – Retrospective 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 where the band performed their studio discography from Autobahn to Tour de France over the course of eight days to sell-out crowds. Kraftwerk performed at the No Nukes 2012 Festival in Tokyo, Japan and the Way Out West in Gothenburg., Kraftwerk stated that they would be playing their Catalogue in Düsseldorf and at London’s Tate Modern. Kraftwerk tickets were priced at £60 in London, but angry fans compared that to the $20 ticket price for tickets at New York’s MoMA in 2012.

Kraftwerk also performed the eight albums of The Catalogue in Sydney, Kraftwerk also performed at the 47th Montreux Jazz Festival, plus a 3-D concert on 12 July at T in the Park – in Balado, Kinross, Scotland, at the Latitude Festival in Suffolk, and the Longitude Festival in Dublin. In 2013 Kraftwerk played four concerts, over two nights, at Evoluon in Eindhoven, Netherlands, a former technology museum of Philips Electronics, now a conference center which was chosen by Ralf Hütter, for its retro-futuristic UFO-like architecture. visuals of the building, with flying saucers descending from space, were displayed during the rendition of Spacelab.In 2014, Kraftwerk performed a four-night, 3D Catalogue tour at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and NYC’s United Palace Theatre. They also played at the Cirkus in Stockholm, Sweden, at the music festival Summer Sonic in Tokyo, Japan, at the brand new Fondation Louis-Vuitton in Paris, France and the iconic Paradiso concert hall in Amsterdam, Netherlands. After being told that the 2015 Tour de France would be starting that year in Utrecht, Ralf Hütter decided that Kraftwerk would perform during the “Grand Depart”.Kraftwerk also played three concerts in TivoliVredenburg performing “Tour de France Soundtracks” and visited the start of the Tour in-between. In 2017, Kraftwerk announced 3-D The Catalogue, a live album and video documenting performances of all eight albums in The Catalogue that was released 26 May 2017. It is available in multiple formats, the most extensive of which being a 4-disc Blu-ray set with a 236-page hardback book.

Isaac Hayes

American songwriter, musician, singer, actor, and voice actor Isaac Lee Hayes, Jr was born August 20, 1942,Hayes began his recording career in the early 1960s, as a session player for various acts of the Memphis-based Stax Records. He later wrote a string of hit songs with songwriting partner David Porter, including “You Don’t Know Like I Know”, “Soul Man”, “When Something Is Wrong with My Baby”, and “Hold On I’m Comin” for Sam & Dave. Hayes, Porter and Stax studio band Booker T. & the M.G.’s were also the producers for Sam & Dave, Carla Thomas and other Stax artists during the mid-1960s. Hayes-Porter contributed to the Stax sound made famous during this period, and Sam & Dave credited Hayes for helping develop both their sound and style. In 1968, Hayes released his debut album, Presenting Isaac Hayes, a jazzy, largely improvised effort that was commercially unsuccessful. His next album was Hot Buttered Soul, which was released in 1969 after Stax had gone through a major upheaval. The label had lost its largest star, Otis Redding, in a plane crash in December 1967. Stax lost all of its back catalog to Atlantic Records in May 1968. As a result, Stax executive vice president Al Bell called for 27 new albums to be completed in mid-1969; Hot Buttered Soul, was the most successful of these releases.This album is noted for Hayes’s image (shaved head, gold jewelry, sunglasses, etc.) and his distinct sound (extended orchestral songs relying heavily on organs, horns, and guitars, deep bass vocals, etc.). Also on the album, Hayes re-interprets “Walk On By” (which had been made famous by Dionne Warwick) into a 12-minute exploration. “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” starts with an eight-minute-long monologue before breaking into song, and the lone original number, the funky “Hyperbolicsyllabicsesquedalymistic” runs nearly ten minutes, a significant break from the standard three-minute soul/pop songs.”Walk On By” would be the first of many times Hayes would take a Burt Bacharach standard, generally made famous as three-minute pop songs by Dionne Warwick or Dusty Springfield, and transform it into a soulful, lengthy and almost gospel number.

In 1970, Hayes released two albums, The Isaac Hayes Movement and To Be Continued. The former stuck to the four-song template of his previous album. Jerry Butler’s “I Stand Accused” begins with a trademark spoken word monologue, and Bacharach’s “I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself” is re-worked. The latter spawned the classic “The Look Of Love”, another Bacharach song transformed into an 11-minute epic of lush orchestral rhythm (mid-way it breaks into a rhythm guitar jam for a couple of minutes before suddenly resuming the slow love song). An edited three-minute version was issued as a single. The album also featured the instrumental “Ike’s Mood,” which segued into his own version of “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”. Hayes released a Christmas single, “The Mistletoe and Me” (with “Winter Snow” as a B-side).In early 1971, Hayes composed music for the soundtrack of the blaxploitation film Shaft. (in the movie, he also appeared in a cameo role as the bartender of No Name Bar). The title theme, with its wah-wah guitar and multi-layered symphonic arrangement, would become a worldwide hit single, and spent two weeks at number one in the Billboard Hot 100 in November. The remainder of the album was mostly instrumentals covering big beat jazz, bluesy funk, and hard Stax-styled soul. The other two vocal songs, the social commentary “Soulville” and the 19-minute jam “Do Your Thing,” would be edited down to hit singles.

Hayes won an Academy Award for Best Original Song for the “Theme from Shaft”, and was nominated for Best Original Dramatic Score for the film’s score.Later in the year, Hayes released a double album, Black Moses, that expanded on his earlier sounds and featured The Jackson 5’s song “Never Can Say Goodbye”. Another single, “I Can’t Help It”, was not featured on the album.In 1972, Hayes would record the theme tune for the TV series The Men and enjoy a hit single (with “Type Thang” as a B-side).He released several other non-album singles during the year, such as “Feel Like Making Love”, “If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don’t Want To Be Right)”, and “Rolling Down a Mountainside”. Atlantic would re-release Hayes’s debut album this year with the new title In The Beginning. Hayes was back in 1973 with an acclaimed live double album, Live At Sahara Tahoe, and followed it up with the album Joy, with the eerie beat of the 15-minute title track. He moved away from cover songs with this album. An edited “Joy” would be a hit single.In 1974, Hayes was featured in the blaxploitation films Three Tough Guys and Truck Turner, and he recorded soundtracks for both.Tough Guys was almost devoid of vocals and Truck Turner yielded a single with the title theme. The soundtrack score was eventually used by filmmaker Quentin Tarantino in the Kill Bill film series and has been used for over 30 years as the opening score of Brazilian radio show Jornal de Esportes on the Jovem Pan station.Unlike most African-American musicians of the period, Hayes did not sport an Afro and instead chose to shave his head bald.

Hayes was one of the creative influences behind the southern soul music label Stax Records, where he served both as an in-house songwriter and as a record producer, teaming with his partner David Porter during the mid-1960s. Hayes, Porter, Bill Withers, the Sherman Brothers, Steve Cropper, and John Fogerty were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005 in recognition of writing scores of notable songs for themselves, the duo Sam & Dave,Carla Thomas, and others.The hit song “Soul Man”, written by Hayes and Porter and first performed by Sam & Dave, has been recognized as one of the most influential songs of the past 50 years by the Grammy Hall of Fame. It was also honored by The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, byRolling Stone magazine, and by the RIAA as one of the Songs of the Century.During the late 1960s, Hayes also began recording music and he had several successful soul albums such as Hot Buttered Soul (1969) and Black Moses (1971).

In addition to his work in popular music, he worked as a composer of musical scores formotion pictures.He is well known for his musical score for the film Shaft (1971). For the “Theme from Shaft”, he was awarded the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1972. He became the third African-American, after Sidney Poitier and Hattie McDaniel, to win anAcademy Award in any competitive field covered by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He also won two Grammy Awards for that same year. Later, he was given his third Grammy for his music album Black Moses.In 1992, in recognition of humanitarian work there, he was crowned the honorary king of the Ada, Ghana region. He also acted in motion pictures and television, such as in the movies Truck Turner and I’m Gonna Git You Sucka, and as Gandolf “Gandy” Fitch in the TV series The Rockford Files (1974–1980). From 1997 to 2005, he lent his distinctive, deep voice to the character “Chef” on the animated TV series South Park., but parted ways with the show after Matt Stone andTrey Parker lampooned Scientology ( Hayes being a devout Scientologist at this point)

Hayes influences included Percy Mayfield, Big Joe Turner, James Brown, Jerry Butler, Sam Cooke, Fats Domino, Marvin Gaye, Otis Redding, and psychedelic soul groups like The Chambers Brothers and Sly and the Family Stone. Allmusic.com says that Isaac Hayes is responsible for the evolution of disco and rap. On August 5, 2003, Hayes was honored as a BMI Icon at the 2003 BMI Urban Awards for his enduring influence on generations of music makers.Throughout his songwriting career, Hayes received five BMI R&B Awards, two BMI Pop Awards, two BMI Urban Awards and six Million-Air citations. Sadly though He sadly passed away 10 August 2008, however, his songs generated more than 12 million performances and still remain popular.

Dave Brock (Hawkwind)

Dave Brock, musician with Hawkwind was born 20 August 1941. Hawkwind are one of the earliest propnants of space rock, a hybrid of hard-rock and acid-rock which combines sonic power and free improvisation. Formed in November 1969, Hawkwind have gone through many changes and styles of music. Dozens of musicians, dancers and writers have worked with the group since their inception. The 1970 debut album was entltled Hawkwind. The began playing free concerts, benefit gigs, and festivals. Playing free outside the Bath Festival, they encountered the Pink Fairies, who shared similar interests in music and recreational activities; a friendship developed which led to the two bands becoming running partners and performing as “Pinkwind”. Their use of drugs, however, led to the departure of Harrison, who did not imbibe, to be replaced briefly by Thomas Crimble (about July ’70 – March ’71). Crimble played on a few BBC sessions before leaving to help organise the Glastonbury Free Festival 1971; Lloyd-Langton also quit, after a bad LSD trip at the Isle of Wight Festival led to a nervous breakdown.

Their follow up album, 1971’s X In Search of Space, brought greater commercial success, reaching number 18 on the UK album charts, and also saw the band’s image and philosophy take shape, courtesy of graphic artist Barney Bubbles and underground press writerRobert Calvert, as depicted in the accompanying Hawklog booklet which would further be developed into the Space Ritual stage show. Science fiction author Michael Moorcock and dancer Stacia also started contributing to the band. Dik Mik left the band, replaced by sound engineer Del Dettmar, but chose to return for this album giving the band two electronics players. Bass player Dave Anderson, who had been in the German band Amon Düül II, had also joined and played on the album but departed before its release because of personal tensions with some other members of the band.Anderson and Lloyd-Langton then formed the short-lived band Amon Din. Meanwhile, Ollis left and bassist Ian “Lemmy” Kilmister and drummer Simon King joined

In 1972 Hawkwind played a benefit concert for the Greasy Truckers at The Roundhouse. A live album of the concert Greasy Truckers Party was released, and after re-recording the vocal, a single “Silver Machine” and album Doremi Fasol Latido  was released  Hawkind also embarked on the Space Ritual tour which featured dancers Stacia and Miss Renee, mime artist Tony Carrera and a light show by Liquid Len. in 1973, the band released the single “Urban Guerrilla” which coincided with an IRA bombing campaign in London, so the BBC refused to play it and the band’s management reluctantly decided to withdraw it fearing accusations of opportunism, despite the disc having already climbed to number 39 in the UK chart. Dik Mik and Calvert departed during 1973. so Simon House was recruited as keyboardist and violinist playing live shows, a North America tour and recording the 1974 album Hall of the Mountain Grill. Dettmar also left whilst Alan Powell deputised for King on the European tour, and later joined King. In 1975, the band recorded the album Warrior on the Edge of Time in collaboration with Michael Moorcock.

Then during a North America tour in May, Lemmy was caught in possession of amphetamine crossing the border from the USA into Canada. The border police mistook the powder for cocaine and he was jailed, forcing the band to cancel some shows. Fed up with his erratic behaviour, the band fired the bass player. replacing him with their long-standing friend and former Pink Fairies guitarist Paul Rudolph. Lemmy then teamed up with another Pink Fairies guitarist, Larry Wallis, to form Motörhead, named after the last song he had written for Hawkwind. Robert Calvert made a guest appearance with band for their headline set at the Reading Festival in August 1975, after which he chose to rejoin the band as a full-time vocalist and front man. Amazing Music is the first album of this era and highlights both Calvert’s well-crafted lyrics written with stage performance in mind and a greater proficiency and scope in the music. But on the eve of recording the follow-up Back on the Streets single, Turner was sacked for his erratic live playing and Powell was deemed surplus to requirements. After a tour to promote the single and during rehearsals for the next album, Rudolph was also sacked for allegedly trying to steer the band into a musical direction at odds with Calvert and Brock’s vision.

Adrian “Ade” Shaw, who as bass player for Magic Muscle had supported Hawkwind on the Space Ritual tour, came in for the 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. The band continued to enjoy moderate commercial success, but Calvert’s mental illness often caused problems. A manic phase saw the band abandon a European tour in France, while a depression phase during a 1978 North American tour convinced Brock to disband the group. In between these two tours. In 1977, Brock and Calvert had performed a one-off gig with Devon band Ark as the Sonic Assassins, and looking for a new project in 1978, bassist Harvey Bainbridge and drummer Martin Griffin were recruited from this event. Steve Swindells was recruited as keyboard player. The band was named Hawklords, and recording took place on a farm in Devon using a mobile studio, resulting in the album 25 Years On. King had originally been the drummer but quit and returned to London, while House, decided to join David Bowie, but nevertheless contributed violin to these sessions. Calvert, wanted King back in the band, fired Griffin, then promptly resigned himself, choosing to pursue a career in literature. Swindells also left to record a solo album

In 1979, Hawkwind reformed with Brock, Bainbridge and King being joined by Huw Lloyd-Langton and Tim Blake and embarking upon a UK tour resulting in the Live Seventy Nine album, quickly followed by the studio album Levitation. However,  King quit and Ginger Baker was drafted in for the sessions, but he chose to stay with the band for the tour, while Brock and Bainbridge Played synthesizers and sequencers themselves, with drummer Griffin from the Hawklords rejoining. This band headlined the 1981 Glastonbury Festival And appeared at the 1982 Donington Monsters of Rock Festival and the Stonehenge Free Festival.  Nik Turner returned for the 1982 Choose Your Masques tour and was invited back permanently. The Earth Ritual tour was filmed for Hawkwind’s first ever video release, Night of the Hawk. Then a young fan named Alan Davey sent a tape of his playing to Brock and Brock chose to oust Reeves moving Bainbridge from bass to keyboards in order to accommodate Davey. This experimental line-up played at the Stonehenge Free Festival in 1984.Subsequent personal and professional tensions Between Brock and Turner caused Turner to leave in 1985. Clive Deamer, was replaced in 1985 by Danny Thompson Jr, a friend of bassist Alan Davey, and remained almost to the end of the decade.

Hawkwind’s most ambitious project, The Chronicle of the Black Sword,based loosely around the Elric series of books by Michael Morcock . Moorcock contributed lyrics, but only performed some spoken pieces on some live dates. The tour was recorded and issued as an album Live Chronicles and video The Chronicle of the Black Sword. A headline appearance at the 1986 Reading Festival was followed by a UK tour which was filmed and released as Chaos. In 1988 the band recorded The Xenon Codex , then Lloyd-Langton and Thompson both departed. Drummer Richard Chadwick, joined and become the band’s drummer to the present day. violinist Simon House was re-instated into the lineup in 1989 and, Hawkwind embarked on a US Tour, Bridget Wishart also joined to become the band’s one and only frontwoman. In 1990 Hawkwind released Space Bandits and Palace Springs in 1991. They also filmed a 1-hour appearance for the Bedrock TVseries. Hawkwind tour the USA again in 1992. Meanwhile bassist Davey left, forming his own Middle-Eastern flavoured hard-rock group Bedouin and a Motörhead tribute act named Ace of Spades. And He was replaced by singer Tree and the band were joined full-time by lead guitarist Jerry Richards for the albums Distant Horizons and In Your Area. Rasta chanter Captain Rizz also joined the band for guest spots during live shows.”Hawkestra”—

A reunion event featuring appearances from past and present members intended to coincide with the band’s 30th anniversary and the release of the career spanning Epocheclipse – 30 Year Anthology set took place 21 October 2000 at the Brixton Academy with about 20 members taking part in a 3+ hour set which was filmed and recorded. Guests included Samantha Fox who sang “Master of the Universe.” The Hawkestra had set a template for Brock to assemble a core band of Tree, Brock, Richards, Davey, Chadwick and for the use of former members as guests on live shows and studio recordings. The 2000 Christmas Astoria show was recorded with contributions from House, Blake, Rizz, Moorcock, Jez Huggett and Keith Kniveton and released as Yule Ritual the following year. In 2001, Davey agreed to rejoin the band permanently, but only after the departure of Tree and Richards.Meanwhile, Turner organised further Hawkestra gigs resulting in the formation of xhawkwind.com, a band consisting mainly of ex-Hawkwind members and playing old Hawkwind songs. An appearance at Guilfest in 2002 led to confusion as to whether this actually was Hawkwind, sufficiently irking Brock into taking legal action to prohibit Turner from trading under the name Hawkwind. Turner lost the case and the band now performs as Space Ritual.

In 2005 the long anticipated new album Take Me to Your Leader was released. Recorded by the core band of Brock/Davey/Chadwick, contributors included new keyboardist Jason Stuart, Arthur Brown, tabloid writer and TV personality Matthew Wright, 1970s New Wave singer Lene Lovich, Simon House and Jez Huggett. This was followed in 2006 by the CD/DVD Take Me to Your Future. Alan Davey left in 2007 And was replaced by Roadie Mr Dibs”, a long-standing member of the road crew. The band performed at their annual Hawkfest festival and headlined the US festival Nearfest and played gigs in PA and NY. At the end of 2007, Tim Blake once again joined the band filling the lead role playing keyboards and theremin. The band played 5 Christmas dates, the London show being released as an audio CD and video DVD under the title Knights of Space. Sadly On 8 September 2008 keyboard player Jason Stuart died due to a brain haemorrhage. In October 2008, Niall Hone joined Hawkwind for their Winter 2008 tour playing guitar, along with returning synth/theremin player Tim Blake. During this period, Hone also occasionally played bass guitar alongside Mr Dibs and used laptops for live electronic improvisation.In 2009, the band began occasionally featuring Jon Sevink, from The Levellers as guest violinist at some shows. Later that year, Hawkwind embarked on a winter tour to celebrate the band’s 40th anniversary, including two gigs on 28 and 29 August marking the anniversary of their first live performances.

In 2010, Hawkwind held their annual Hawkfest at the site of the original Isle Of Wight Festival, marking the 40th anniversary of their appearance there. On 21 June 2010, Hawkwind released a studio album entitled Blood of the Earth. Since early 2011 Hone has primarily played bass onstage, while Mr. Dibs has moved to a more traditional lead singer role, supplemented with occasional cello work. April 2012 saw the release of a new album, Onward, on the Plastichead’s Eastworld Records imprint. Keyboardist Dead Fred rejoined Hawkwind for the 2012 tour in support of Onward and has continued to perform with the band on subsequent tours.In November 2012, a power trio subset (Brock, Chadwick and Hone) of the current touring line-up released an album under the name “Hawkwind Light Orchestra,” titled Stellar Variations, on the Esoteric Recordings sub-label of Cherry Red Records.At the end of March 2013, Hawkwind held a two-day festival, “Hawkeaster”, at Seaton Town Hall in Devon. The band chose the Town Hall in an effort to save the venue from closure. Hawkeaster 2013 included the first two Hawkwind performances of The Warrior 2013 Tour, in which the band perform their 1975 album Warrior On The Edge Of Time in its entirety to celebrate the album’s 40th anniversary re-release.

H. P. Lovecraft

American author Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born August 20, 1890, known as H. P. Lovecraft he wrote mostly horror, fantasy, poetry and science fiction, especially the subgenre known as weird fiction. Lovecraft’s guiding aesthetic and philosophical principle was what he termed “cosmicism” or “cosmic horror”, the idea that life is incomprehensible to human minds and that the universe is fundamentally inimical to the interests of humankind. As such, his stories express a profound indifference to human beliefs and affairs. Lovecraft is the originator of the Cthulhu Mythos story cycle and the Necronomicon, a fictional magical textbook of rites and forbidden lore.

PrintSome of Lovecraft’s work was inspired by his own nightmares. His interest started from his childhood days when his grandfather would tell him Gothic horror stories. Lovecraft’s biggest influence was Edgar Allan Poe and forbidden knowledge Is often a central theme in many of Lovecraft’s works.Many of his characters are driven by curiosity or scientific endeavor, and in many of his stories the knowledge they uncover proves Promethean in nature, either filling the seeker with regret for what they have learned, destroying them psychically, or completely destroying the person who holds the knowledge. Some critics argue that this theme is a reflection of Lovecraft’s contempt of the world around him, causing him to search inwardly for knowledge and inspiration. The beings of Lovecraft’s mythos often have human (or mostly human) servants; Cthulhu, for instance, is worshiped under various names by cults amongst both the Eskimos of Greenlandand voodoo circles of Louisiana, and in many other parts of the world.These worshipers served a useful narrative purpose for Lovecraft. Many beings of the Mythos were too powerful to be defeated by human opponents, and so horrific that direct knowledge of them meant insanity for the victim. When dealing with such beings, Lovecraft needed a way to provide exposition and build tension without bringing the story to a premature end. Human followers gave him a way to reveal information about their “gods” in a diluted form, and also made it possible for his protagonists to win paltry victories. Lovecraft, like his contemporaries, envisioned “savages” as closer to supernatural knowledge unknown to civilized man. Another recurring theme in Lovecraft’s stories is the idea that descendants in a bloodline can never escape the stain of crimes committed by their forebears, at least if the crimes are atrocious enough. Descendants may be very far removed, both in place and in time (and, indeed, in culpability), from the act itself, and yet, they may be haunted by the revenant past, e.g. “The Rats in the Walls”, “The Lurking Fear”, “Arthur Jermyn”, “The Alchemist”, “The Shadow Over Innsmouth”, “The Doom that Came to Sarnath” and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

Often in Lovecraft’s works the protagonist is not in control of his own actions, or finds it impossible to change course. Many of his characters would be free from danger if they simply managed to run away; but are being prevented by some outside force, such as in “The Colour Out of Space” and “The Dreams in the Witch House”. Often his characters are subject to a compulsive influence from powerful malevolent or indifferent beings. As with the inevitability of one’s ancestry, eventually even running away, or death itself, provides no safety (“The Thing on the Doorstep”, “The Outsider”, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, etc.). In some cases, humanity itself is doomed and no escape is possible (“The Shadow Out of Time”). Lovecraft was also familiar with the work of the German conservative-revolutionary theorist Oswald Spengler, whose pessimistic thesis of the decadence of the modern West formed a crucial element in Lovecraft’s overall anti-modern worldview. Spenglerian imagery of cyclical decay is present in At the Mountains of Madness. The book H. P. Lovecraft: The Decline of the West, places Spengler at the center of his discussion of Lovecraft’s political and philosophical ideas.

H. P. Lovecraft’s writing, particularly the so-called Cthulhu Mythos, has influenced fiction authors including modern horror and fantasy writers such as Stephen King, Ramsey Campbell, Bentley Little, Joe R. Lansdale, Alan Moore, Junji Ito, F. Paul Wilson, Brian Lumley, Caitlín R. Kiernan, and Neil Gaiman, have cited Lovecraft as one of their primary influences. Beyond direct adaptation, Lovecraft and his stories have had a profound impact on popular culture. Some influence was direct, as he was a friend, inspiration, and correspondent to many of his contemporaries, such as August Derleth, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch and Fritz Leiber. Many later figures were influenced by Lovecraft’s works, including author and artist Clive Barker, prolific horror writer Stephen King, comics writers Alan Moore and Mike Mignola, film directors John Carpenter, Stuart Gordon, Guillermo Del Toro and artist H. R. Giger.

Japan has also been significantly inspired and terrified by Lovecraft’s creations and thus even entered the manga and anime media. Chiaki J. Konaka is an acknowledged Lovecraft disciple and has participated in Cthulhu Mythos, expanding several Japanese versions. Anime scriptwriter Cascade also tends to add horror elements and is credited for spreading the popularity of Lovecraft among anime base. Manga artist Junji Ito is also inspired by Lovecraft.

Although Lovecraft’s readership was limited during his lifetime, his reputation has grown over the decades, and he is now regarded as one of the most influential horror writers of the 20th century. According to Joyce Carol Oates, an award-winning author, Lovecraft—as with Edgar Allan Poe in the 19th century—has exerted “an incalculable influence on succeeding generations of writers of horror fiction”. Science fiction and fantasy authorStephen King called Lovecraft “the twentieth century’s greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale. King has made it clear in his non-fiction book danse Macabre that Lovecraft was responsible for King’s own fascination with horror and the macabre, and was the single largest figure to influence his fiction writing. Sadly though in 1936, Lovecraft was diagnosed with cancer of the small intestine, and as a result he suffered from malnutrition. He lived in constant pain until his death on March 15, 1937, in Providence. However Lovecraft’s legacy lives on and his stories have been adapted into plays, films and games, such as Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth and id Software’s Quake.

World Mosquito Day

World Mosquito Day, is observed annually on 20 August, to commemorate British doctor Sir Ronald Ross, who in 1897, discovered that female mosquitoes transmit malaria between humans. Ross is responsible for the annual observance, having declared shortly after his discovery that the day should be known as World Mosquito Day in the future. The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine also holds Mosquito Day celebrations every year, including events such as parties and exhibitions, in a tradition dating back to as early as the 1930s.

Mosquitoes are small, midge-like flies that constitute the family Culicidae. Females of most species are ectoparasites, whose tube-like mouthparts (called a proboscis) pierce the hosts’ skin to consume blood. The word “mosquito” (formed by mosca and diminutive -ito is Spanish for “little fly”. Thousands of species feed on the blood of various kinds of hosts, mainly vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and even some kinds of fish. Some mosquitoes also attack invertebrates, mainly other arthropods. Though the loss of blood is seldom of any importance to the victim, the saliva of the mosquito often causes an irritating rash that is a serious nuisance. Much more serious though, are the roles of many species of mosquitoes as vectors of diseases. In passing from host to host, some transmit extremely harmful infections such as malaria, yellow fever, Chikungunya, West Nile virus, dengue fever, filariasis, Zika virus and other arboviruses, rendering it the deadliest animal family in the world.

The oldest known mosquito with an anatomy similar to modern species was found in 79-million-year-old Canadian amber from the Cretaceous. An older sister species with more primitive features was found in Burmese amber that is 90 to 100 million years old. Two mosquito fossils have been found that show very little morphological change in modern mosquitoes against their counterpart from 46 million years ago. These fossils are also the oldest ever found to have blood preserved within their abdomens.

Despite no fossils being found earlier than the Cretaceous, recent studies suggest that the earliest divergence of mosquitoes between the lineages leading to Anophelinae and Culicinae occurred 226 million years ago. The Old and New World Anopheles species are believed to have subsequently diverged about 95 million years ago. Over 3,500 species of the Culicidae have already been described. They are generally divided into two subfamilies which in turn comprise some 43 genera. These figures are subject to continual change, as more species are discovered, and as DNA studies change the taxonomy of the family. The two main subfamilies are the Anophelinae and Culicinae, these two subfamilies tend to transmit different diseases. Culicine species tend to transmit arboviral diseases such as yellow fever and dengue. Some species transmit various species of avian malaria, and various forms of filariasis, likemany Simuliidae do. Anopheline mosquitoes, sometimes bear pathogenic arboviruses, and are likely to transmit Human Malaria.

Mosquitoes are members of a family of nematocerid flies: the Culicidae (from the Latin culex, genitive culicis, meaning “midge” or “gnat”) Superficially, mosquitoes resemble crane flies (family Tipulidae) and chironomid flies (family Chironomidae). In particular, the females of many species of mosquitoes are blood-eating pests and spread many dangerous diseases, whereas members of the similar-looking Chironomidae and Tipulidae are not. Many species of mosquitoes are not blood eaters and of those that are, many create a “high to low pressure” in the blood to obtain it and do not transmit disease. Also, in the bloodsucking species, only the females suck blood. even among mosquitoes that do carry diseases, not all of them transmit the same kinds of diseases, nor do they all transmit the diseases under the same circumstances; as their habits differ. So far Over 3,500 species of mosquitoes have already been described. Some mosquitoes that bite humans spread a number of infectious diseases affecting millions of people per year. Others that do not routinely bite humans, but spread animal diseases, may spread new diseases when their habitats are disturbed, for instance by sudden deforestation.