Legacy of spies by John LeCarré

I would like to read Legacy of Spies, the latest exciting spy thriller by John LeCarré. It takes place 25 years after the Cold War ended and features Peter Guillam, once a staunch colleague and disciple of George Smiley of the British Secret Service, otherwise known as the Circus, who has retired to his family farmstead on the south coast of Brittany. However a letter from his old Service summons him to London, The reason? His Cold War past has come back to haunt him.

Now intelligence operations that were once the toast of secret London, and involved such characters as Alec Leamas, Jim Prideaux, George Smiley and Peter Guillam himself, are to be scrutinised under disturbing criteria by a generation with no memory of the Cold War and no patience with its justifications. Peter Guillam, soon finds himself on the wrong end of a post-modern Circus legal interrogation into the historical legacy of his former boss, George Smiley, during the height of the Cold War. Now Somebody must be made to pay for innocent blood once spilt in the name of the greater good

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Luciano Pavarotti

Italian operatic tenor Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI sadly died 6 September 2007 at the age of 71. He was born 12 October 1932. After abandoning the dream of becoming a football goalkeeper, Pavarotti spent seven years in vocal training. Pavarotti’s earliest musical influences were his father’s recordings, most of them featuring the popular tenors of the day – Beniamino Gigli, Giovanni Martinelli, Tito Schipa, and Enrico Caruso. Pavarotti’s favourite tenor and idol was Giuseppe Di Stefano. He was also deeply influenced by Mario Lanza, saying, “In my teens I used to go to Mario Lanza movies and then come home and imitate him in the mirror”. At around the age of nine he began singing with his father in a small local church choir. He graduated from the Scuola Magistrale and After training to be a teacher he subsequently began teaching, but finally allowed his interest in music to win out and began the serious study of music in 1954 at the age of 19 with Arrigo Pola, a respected teacher and professional tenor in Modena who offered to teach him without remuneration.In 1955, he experienced his first singing success when he was a member of the Corale Rossini, a male voice choir from Modena that also included his father, which won first prize at the International Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales. He later said that this was the most important experience of his life, and that it inspired him to become a professional singer.At about this time Pavarotti first met Adua Veroni. They married in 1961.

Pavarotti began his career as a tenor in smaller regional Italian opera houses, making his debut as Rodolfo in La bohème at the Teatro Municipale in Reggio Emilia in April 1961.with Joan Sutherland in I puritani (1976). He made his first international appearance in La traviata in Belgrade, Yugoslavia anddebuted at the Vienna State Opera in the same role. In 1963 Pavarotti again played Rodolfo and Duca di Mantova in Rigoletto in vienna and also sang in Dundalk, Ireland for the St Cecilia’s Gramophone Society and made his Royal Opera House debut, as Rodolfo.He got a lucky break when Joan Sutherland (and her conductor husband, Richard Bonynge), were looking for a young tenor taller than herself to take along on her tour to Australia.With his commanding physical presence, Pavarotti proved ideal.The two sang some forty performances over two months, .Pavarotti made his American début with the Greater Miami Opera in February 1965, singing in Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor opposite Joan Sutherland on the stage of the Miami-Dade County Auditorium in Miami. Sutherland recommended the young Pavarotti as he was well acquainted with the role.,

Pavarotti made his La Scala debut in the revival of the famousFranco Zeffirelli production of La bohème, with his childhood friend Mirella Freni singing Mimi and Herbert von Karajan conducting. Karajan had requested the singer’s engagement. After an extended Australian tour, he returned to La Scala, where he added Tebaldo from I Capuleti e i Montecchi to his repertoire , with Giacomo Aragall as Romeo. His first appearance as Tonio in Donizetti’s La fille du régiment took place at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. It was his performances of this role that would earn him the title of “King of the High Cs”.He scored another major triumph in Rome when he sang in I Lombardi opposite Renata Scotto. Early commercial recordings included a recital of Donizetti (the aria from Don Sebastiano) and Verdi arias, as well as a complete L’elisir d’amore with Sutherland.His major breakthrough in the United States came on 17 February 1972, in a production of La fille du régiment at New York’sMetropolitan Opera, in which he drove the crowd into a frenzy with his nine effortless high Cs in the signature aria. He achieved a record seventeen curtain calls

Pavarotti sang his international recital début at William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, 1973, as part of the college’s Fine Arts Program, now known as the Harriman-Jewell Series.He began to give frequent television performances, starting with his performances as Rodolfo (La bohème) in the first Live from the Mettelecast in March 1977, and won many Grammy awards and platinum and gold discs for his performances.In 1976, Pavarotti debuted at the Salzburg Festival, appearing in a solo recital on 31 July, accompanied by pianist Leone Magiera. Pavarotti returned to the festival in 1978 with a recital and as the Italian singer in Der Rosenkavalier in 1983 with Idomeneo, and both in 1985 and 1988 with solo recitals.In 1979, he was profiled in a cover story in the weekly magazine Time. That same year saw Pavarotti’s return to the Vienna State Opera after an absence of fourteen years. With Herbert von Karajan conducting, Pavarotti sang Manrico in Il trovatore. In 1978, he appeared in a solo recital on Live from Lincoln Center.

In the 1980s, he set up The Pavarotti International Voice Competition for young singers, performing with the winners in 1982 in excerpts of La bohème and L’elisir d’amore. The second competition, in 1986, staged excerpts of La bohème and Un ballo in maschera. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of his career, he brought the winners to gala performances of La bohème in Modena and Genoa, and then to China where they staged performances of La bohème in Beijing (Peking). To conclude the visit, Pavarotti performed the inaugural concert in the Great Hall of the People before 10,000 people, receiving a standing ovation for nine effortless high Cs. The third competition in 1989 staged performances of L’elisir d’amore and Un ballo in maschera. The winners of the fifth competition accompanied Pavarotti in performances in Philadelphia in 1997.In the mid-1980s, Pavarotti returned to, the Vienna State Opera and La Scala. Vienna playing the role of Rodolfo in La bohème with Carlos Kleiber conducting and again Mirella Freni was Mimi; as Nemorino in L’elisir d’amore; he was also cast as Radames in Aida conducted by Lorin Maazel; as Rodolfo in Luisa Miller; and as Gustavo in Un ballo in maschera. In 1996, Pavarotti appeared for the last time at the Staatsoper in Andrea Chénier.In 1985, Pavarotti sang Radames at La Scala opposite Maria Chiara in a Luca Ronconi production conducted by Maazel, recorded on video. His performance of the aria “Celeste Aida” received a two-minute ovation on the opening night. He was reunited with Mirella Freni for the San Francisco Opera production of La bohème in 1988, also recorded on video. In 1992, La Scala saw Pavarotti in a new Zeffirelli production of Don Carlos, conducted by Riccardo Muti.

Pavarotti became even better known throughout the world in 1990 when his rendition of the aria “Nessun Dorma” from Giacomo Puccini’s Turandot was taken as the theme song of BBC’s TV coverage of the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy. The aria achieved pop status and remained his trademark song. This was followed by the hugely successful Three Tenors concert, held on the eve of the World Cup final at the ancient Baths of Caracalla in Rome with fellow tenors Plácido Domingo and José Carreras and conductor Zubin Mehta, which became the biggest selling classical record of all time. A highlight of the concert, in which Pavarotti hammed up a famous portion of di Capua’s “O Sole Mio” and was mimicked by Domingo and Carreras to the delight of the audience, became one of the most memorable moments in contemporary operatic history. Throughout the 1990s, Pavarotti appeared in many well-attended outdoor concerts, including his televised concert in London’s Hyde Park, which drew a record attendance of 150,000. In June 1993, more than 500,000 listeners gathered for his free performance on the Great Lawn of New York’s Central Park, while millions more around the world watched on television. The following September, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, he sang for an estimated crowd of 300,000. Following on from the original 1990 concert, the Three Tenors concerts were held during the Football World Cups: in Los Angeles in 1994, in Paris in 1998, and in Yokohama in 2002.In 1995, Pavarotti’s friends, the singer Lara Saint Paul (as Lara Cariaggi) and her husband showman Pier Quinto Cariaggi, who had produced and organised Pavarotti’s 1990 FIFA World Cup Celebration Concert at the PalaTrussardi in Milan produced and wrote the television documentary The Best is Yet to Come, in which Pavarotti spoke candidly about his life and career. On 12 December 1998, he became the first (and, to date, only) opera singer to perform on Saturday Night Live, singing alongsideVanessa L. Williams. He also sang with U2 in the band’s 1995 song “Miss Sarajevo” and with Mercedes Sosa in a big concert at theBoca Juniors arena La Bombonera in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

He has received an enormous number of awards and honours, including Grammy Legend Award. and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2001. He also holds two Guinness World Records: one for receiving the most curtain callsand another for the best-selling classical album (In Concert by The Three Tenors). (The latter record is thus shared by fellow tenors Plácido Domingo and José Carreras.)In late 2003, he released his final compilation—and his first and only “crossover” album, Ti Adoro. Most of the 13 songs were written and produced by Michele Centonze, who had already helped produce the “Pavarotti & Friends” concerts between 1998 and 2000.[20] The tenor described the album as a wedding gift to Nicoletta Mantovani. That same year he was made a Commander of Monaco’s Order of Cultural Merit.[21]Pavarotti began his farewell tour in 2004, at the age of 69, performing one last time in old and new locations, after more than four decades on the stage. On 13 March 2004, Pavarotti gave his last performance in an opera at the New York Metropolitan Opera, for which he received a long standing ovation for his role as the painter Mario Cavaradossi in Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca. On 1 December 2004, he announced a 40-city farewell tour. Pavarotti and his manager, Terri Robson, commissioned impresario Harvey Goldsmith to produce the Worldwide Farewell Tour.

His last full-scale performance was at the end of a two-month Australasian tour in Taiwan in December 2005.In March 2005, Pavarotti underwent neck surgery to repair two vertebrae. In early 2006, he underwent further back surgery and contracted an infection while in the hospital in New York, forcing cancellation of concerts in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K.On 10 February 2006, Pavarotti sang “Nessun Dorma” at the 2006 Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Turin, Italy, at his final performance. In the last act of the opening ceremony, his performance received the longest and loudest ovation of the night from the international crowd. Leone Magiera, who directed the performance, revealed in his 2008 memoirs, Pavarotti Visto da Vicino, that the performance was prerecorded weeks earlier. “The orchestra pretended to play for the audience, I pretended to conduct and Luciano pretended to sing. The effect was wonderful,” he wrote. Pavarotti’s manager, Terri Robson, said that the tenor had turned the Winter Olympic Committee’s invitation down several times because it would have been impossible to sing late at night in the subzero conditions of Turin in February. The committee eventually persuaded him to take part by prerecording the song.

Pavarotti annually hosted the “Pavarotti and Friends” charity concerts in Modena in Italy, joining with singers including Andrea Bocelli, Jon Bon Jovi, Bryan Adams, Bono, James Brown, Mariah Carey, Eric Clapton,Sheryl Crow, Céline Dion, Anastacia, Elton John, Deep Purple, Meat Loaf, Queen, George Michael, Sting and the Spice Girls, to raise money for several UN causes. Concerts were held for War Child, and victims of war and civil unrest in Bosnia, Guatemala, Kosovo and Iraq. After the war in Bosnia, he financed and established the Pavarotti Music Centre in the southern city of Mostar to offer Bosnia’s artists the opportunity to develop their skills. For these contributions, the city of Sarajevo named him an honorary citizen. He performed at benefit concerts to raise money for victims of tragedies such as the Spitak earthquake that killed 25,000 people in northern Armenia in December 1988, and sang Gounod’s Ave Maria with legendary French pop music star and ethnic Armenian Charles Aznavour.He was a close friend of Diana, Princess of Wales. They raised money for the elimination of land mines worldwide. He was invited to sing at her funeral service, but declined to sing, as he felt he could not sing well “with his grief in his throat”. Nonetheless, he attended the service.

In 1998, he was appointed the United Nations Messenger of Peace, using his fame to raise awareness of UN issues, including theMillennium Development Goals, HIV/AIDS, child rights, urban slums and poverty.In 1999, Pavarotti performed a charity benefit concert in Beirut, to mark Lebanon’s reemergence on the world stage after a brutal 15 year civil war. The largest concert held in Beirut since the end of the war, it was attended by 20,000 people who travelled from countries as distant as Saudi Arabia and Bulgaria.In 2001, Pavarotti received the Nansen Medal from the UN High Commission for Refugees for his efforts raising money on behalf ofrefugees worldwide. Through benefit concerts and volunteer work, he has raised more than any other individual.Other honours he received include the “Freedom of London Award” and The Red Cross “Award for Services to Humanity”, for his work in raising money for that organization, and the 1998 “MusiCares Person of the Year”, given to humanitarian heroes by the National Academy of Recording Arts and SciencesHe was a National Patron of Delta Omicron, an international professional music fraternity.

While undertaking an international “farewell tour,” in 2006 Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The tenor had major abdominal surgery and made plans for the resumption and conclusion of his singing commitments. However he eventually succumbed. his manager, Terri Robson, noted in an e-mail statement, “The Maestro fought a long, tough battle against the pancreatic cancer which eventually took his life. In fitting with the approach that characterized his life and work, he remained positive until finally succumbing to the last stages of his illness”. Pavarotti’s funeral was held in Modena Cathedral. Romano Prodi and Kofi Annan attended. The Frecce Tricolori aerobatic demonstration team of the Italian Air Force, flew overhead, leaving green-white-red smoke trails. After a funeral procession through the centre of Modena, Pavarotti’s coffin was taken to Montale Rangone, a village part of Castelnuovo Rangone, and was entombed in the Pavarotti family crypt.

Roger Waters (Pink Floyd)

Roger Waters was born on 6 September 1943, in Great Bookham, Surrey. He attended Morley Memorial Junior School in Cambridge and then the Cambridgeshire High School for Boys (now Hills Road Sixth Form College) with Syd Barrett, while his future musical partner, David Gilmour, lived nearby on the city’s Mill Road, and attended the Perse School.At 15, Waters was chairman of the Cambridge Youth Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (YCND), having designed its publicity poster and participated in its organisation.Though he was a keen sportsman and a highly regarded member of the high school’s cricket and rugby teams. Whereas Waters knew Barrett and Gilmour from his childhood in Cambridge, he met future Pink Floyd founder members Nick Mason and Richard Wright in London at the Regent Street Polytechnic (later the University of Westminster) school of architecture. Waters enrolled there in 1962, and initially considered a career in mechanical engineering.

However By September 1963, Waters and Mason had lost interest in their studies; they had moved into the lower flat of Stanhope Gardens, owned by Mike Leonard, a part-time tutor at the Regent Street Polytechnic.15] Waters, Mason and Wright first played music together in the autumn of 1963, in a band formed by vocalist Keith Noble and bassist Clive Metcalfe. They usually called themselves Sigma 6, but also used the name the Meggadeaths. Waters played rhythm guitar and Mason played drums, Wright played on any keyboard. In the early years the band performed during private functions and rehearsed in a tearoom in the basement of Regent Street Polytechnic. When Metcalfe and Noble left to form their own group in September 1963, the remaining members asked Barrett and guitarist Bob Klose to join. Waters switched to the bass and by January 1964, the group became known as the Abdabs, the Screaming Abdabs, Leonard’s Lodgers, Spectrum Five, the Tea Set and finally Pink Floyd. By early 1966 Barrett was Pink Floyd’s front-man, guitarist, and songwriter.

He wrote or co-wrote all but one track of their debut LP The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, released in 1967.Waters contributed the song “Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk”. Unfortunately Barrett’s deteriorating mental health and increasingly erratic behaviour, rendered him “unable or unwilling” to continue in his capacity as Pink Floyd’s singer-songwriter and lead guitarist and in 1968 Barrett agreed to leave Pink Floyd and David Gilmour arrived In April 1968. After Barrett’s departure in March 1968, Waters began to chart Pink Floyd’s artistic direction. He became the principal songwriter, lyricist and co-lead vocalist (along with Gilmour, and at times, Wright), and would remain the band’s dominant creative figure until his departure in 1985. He wrote the lyrics to the five Pink Floyd albums starting with The Dark Side of the Moon (1973) and ending with The Final Cut (1983), exerting progressively more creative control over the band and its music. The Dark Side of the Moon became one of the most commercially successful rock albums ever. It was followed by Wish You Were Here (1975), Animals (1977) and The Wall (1979) and The Final Cut (1983). He often referred to the cost of war and the loss of his father throughout his work, from “Corporal Clegg” (A Saucerful of Secrets, 1968) and “Free Four” (Obscured by Clouds, 1972) to “Us and Them” from The Dark Side of the Moon, “When the Tigers Broke Free”, first used in the feature film, The Wall (1982) and the “The Fletcher Memorial Home”. The last band performance of The Wall was on 16 June 1981, at Earls Court London, and this was Pink Floyd’s last appearance with Waters until the band’s brief reunion at 2 July 2005 Live 8 concert in London’s Hyde Park, 24 years later. In March 1983, the last Waters–Gilmour–Mason collaboration, The Final Cut, was released. The album was subtitled: “A requiem for the post-war dream by Roger Waters, The lyrics were critical of the Conservative Party government of the day.

Amidst a power struggle and creative differences within the group, Waters left Pink Floyd in 1985, and began a bitter legal battle with the remaining band members regarding their continued use of the name and material. In October 1986, he initiated High Court proceedings to formally dissolve the Pink Floyd partnership, referring to Pink Floyd as a “spent force creatively”. Gilmore and Mason opposed the application and announced their intention to continue as Pink Floyd. A settlement was finally reached 1987. Waters was released from his contractual obligation and he retained the copyrights to The Wall concept and the inflatable Animals pig. Subsequently Pink Floyd released three studio albums without Waters: A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987), The Division Bell (1994) and The Final Cut.

Following the release of The Final Cut, Waters embarked on a solo career that produced three concept albums and a movie soundtrack. In 1984 he released The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, which features guitarist Eric Clapton, jazz saxophonist David Sanborn, and artwork by Gerald Scarfe. In 1986, Waters contributed songs and a score to the soundtrack of the animated movie When the Wind Blows, based on the Raymond Briggs book of the same name. His backing band featuring Paul Carrack was credited as The Bleeding Heart Band. In 1987, Waters released Radio K.A.O.S., a concept album based on a mute man named Billy from an impoverished Welsh mining town who has the ability to physically tune into radio waves in his head. Billy first learns to communicate with a radio DJ, and eventually to control the world’s computers. Angry at the state of the world in which he lives, he simulates a nuclear attack.

In November 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, and in July 1990 Waters staged one of the largest and most elaborate rock concerts in history, The Wall – Live in Berlin, on the vacant terrain between Potsdamer Platz and the Brandenburg Gate. The show reported an official attendance of 200,000, with one billion television viewers. Leonard Cheshire asked him to do the concert to raise funds for charity. Waters’ group of musicians included Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Cyndi Lauper, Bryan Adams, Scorpions, and Sinéad O’Connor. Waters also used an East German symphony orchestra and choir, a Soviet marching band, and a pair of helicopters from the US 7th Airborne Command and Control Squadron.

On 1992 He released his third studio album, Amused to Death, Which is heavily influenced by the events of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 and the Gulf War, and a critique of the notion of war becoming the subject of entertainment, particularly on television. The title was derived from the book Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman. It featured Jeff Beck on lead guitar on many of the album’s tracks. The album also garnered some comparison to his previous work with Pink Floyd. Waters described the record as, a “stunning piece of work”, ranking the album with Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall as one of the best of his career. It featured the song “What God Wants, Pt. 1”.

In 1999, after a 12-year hiatus from touring, and a seven-year absence from the music industry, Waters embarked on the In the Flesh tour, performing both solo and Pink Floyd material. A concert film was released on CD and DVD, named In the Flesh – Live. During the tour, he played two new songs “Flickering Flame” and “Each Small Candle”In June 2002, he performed in front of 70,000 people at the Glastonbury Festival of Performing Arts, playing 15 Pink Floyd songs and five songs from his solo catalogue.

Waters played a prominent roll In the 2004 aBroadway Production of The Wall , this contained original tracks from The Wall, and songs from Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here and other Pink Floyd albums, as well as new material. In July 2004, Waters also released two new tracks on the Internet: “To Kill the Child”, inspired by the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and “Leaving Beirut”, an anti-war song “inspired by his travels in the Middle East as a teenager”. In 2005, Waters reunited with Mason, Wright, and Gilmour for what would be their final performance together at the 2005 Live 8 concert in London’s Hyde Park, Pink Floyd’s only appearance with Waters since their final performance of The Wall at Earls Court London 24 years earlier. They played a 23-minute set consisting of “Speak to Me/Breathe”/”Breathe (Reprise)”, “Money”, “Wish You Were Here”, and “Comfortably Numb”. In November 2005, Pink Floyd were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame by Pete Townshend of the Who.

In September 2005, Waters released Ça Ira French for “it will be fine”; Waters added the subtitle, “There is Hope”), an opera in three acts translated from the late Étienne Roda-Gil’s French libretto based on the historical subject of the French Revolution. featuring baritone Bryn Terfel, soprano Ying Huang and tenor Paul Groves. Set during the early French Revolution, the original libretto was co-written in French by Roda-Gil and his wife Nadine Delahaye. Waters had begun rewriting the libretto in English in 1989. In June 2006, Waters commenced The Dark Side of the Moon Live tour, a two-year, world-spanning effort that began in Europe in June and North America in September. The first half of the show featured both Pink Floyd songs and Waters’ solo material, while the second half included a complete live performance of the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon, using elaborate staging as well as laser lights, fog machines, pyrotechnics, psychedelic projections, and inflatable floating puppets (Spaceman and Pig) controlled by a “handler” dressed as a butcher, and a full 360-degree quadraphonic sound system was used. Nick Mason joined Waters for The Dark Side of the Moon set and the encores on select 2006 tour dates. In March 2007, Waters also wrote the song, “Hello (I Love You)” for the science fiction film The Last Mimzy. He also performed at California’s Coachella Festival in April 2008 and was to be among the headlining artists performing at Live Earth 2008 in Mumbai, India in December 2008,but that concert was cancelled in light of the 26 November terrorist attacks in Mumbai.

n June 2010, Waters released a cover of “We Shall Overcome”, a protest song rewritten and arranged by Guy Carawan and Pete Seeger at the Highlander Folk School possibly derived either from the refrain of a gospel hymn published by Charles Albert Tindley in 1901, but more likely from Louise Shropshire’s hymn, “If My Jesus Wills.” He performed with David Gilmour at the Hoping Foundation Benefit Evening in July 2010, plating: “To Know Him Is to Love Him”,”Wish You Were Here”, “Comfortably Numb”, and “Another Brick in the Wall (Part Two)”.Waters also commenced The Wall Live tour, an updated version of the original Pink Floyd shows, featuring a complete performance of The Wall Which has been described as one of the most ambitious and complex rock shows ever . At The O2 Arena in London on 12 May 2011, Gilmour and Mason once again appeared with Waters and Gilmour performing “Comfortably Numb”, and Gilmour and Mason joining Waters for “Outside the Wall”. Waters also performed at the Concert for Sandy Relief at Madison Square Garden on 12 December 2012 and headlined the Newport Folk Festival in Newport, Rhode Island in 2015 accompanied by the band My Morning Jacket and two singers from the group Lucius.

As a member of Pink Floyd, Waters was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. That same year he released Ça Ira, an opera in three acts translated from Étienne and Nadine Roda-Gils’ libretto about the French Revolution. Later that year, he reunited with Pink Floyd bandmates Mason, Wright and David Gilmour for the Live 8 global awareness event; it was the group’s first appearance with Waters since 1981. He has toured extensively as a solo act since 1999 and played The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety for his world tour of 2006–2008. In 2010, he began The Wall Live and in 2011 Gilmour and Mason appeared with him during a performance of the double album in London. As of 2013, the tour is the highest-grossing of all time by a solo artist.