International Day of the Girl Child

International Day of the Girl Child is held annually on 11 October to increase awareness of issues faced by girls around the world such as educating girls which helps reduce the rate of child marriage, disease and helps strengthen the economy by helping girls have access to higher paying jobs. However Many global development plans,do not include or consider girls, and their issues become “invisible.”More than 62 million girls around the world have no access to education. Worldwide and collectively, girls ages 5 to 14 spend more than 160 million hours more on household chores than boys of the same age do. Globally, one in four girls are married before age 18. On October 11, 2016, Emma Watson, who is also the United Nations Women’s Goodwill Ambassador, urged countries and families worldwide to end child marriage. Many girls around the world are vulnerable to acts of sexual violence and the perpetrators often go unpunished

The International Day of the Girl Child initiative began as a project of Plan International, a non-governmental organization that operates worldwide.The idea for an international day of observance and celebration grew out of Plan International’s Because I Am a Girl campaign, which raises awareness of the importance of nurturing girls globally and in developing countries in particular. Plan International representatives in Canada approached the Canadian federal government to seek to the coalition of supporters raised awareness of the initiative internationally. Eventually, Plan International urged the United Nations to become involved.

International Day of the Girl Child was formally proposed as a resolution by Canada in the United Nations General Assembly. Rona Ambrose, Canada’s Minister for the Status of Women, sponsored the resolution; a delegation of women and girls made presentations in support of the initiative at the 55th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. On December 19, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly voted to pass a resolution adopting October 11, 2012 as the inaugural International Day of the Girl Child. The resolution states that the Day of the Girl recognizes

The empowerment of and investment in girls, is critical for economic growth, the achievement of all Millennium Development Goals, including the eradication of poverty and extreme poverty, as well as the meaningful participation of girls in decisions that affect them, are key in breaking the cycle of discrimination and violence and in promoting and protecting the full and effective enjoyment of their human rights, and recognizing also that empowering girls requires their active participation in decision-making processes and the active support and engagement of their parents, legal guardians, families and care providers, as well as boys and men and the wider community

Each year’s Day of the Girl has a theme; the first was “ending child marriage”, the second, in 2013, was “innovating for girl’s education”,the third, in 2014, was “Empowering Adolescent Girls: Ending the Cycle of Violence.” and the fourth, in 2015 was “The Power of Adolescent Girl: Vision for 2030”. The 2016 theme is “Girls’ Progress = Goals’ Progress: What Counts for Girls.”The 2017 theme is “EmPOWER Girls: Before, during and after crises”.

Various events to promote the Day of the Girl are held in a number of countries. Some are sponsored by the United Nations, such as a concert in Mumbai, India. Non-governmental organizations, such as the Girl Guides Australia, are supporting events and activities for International Day of the Girl Child. Local organizations have developed their own events, such as Girls and Football South Africa, who will distribute T-shirts on International Day of the Girl Child to commemorate the 1956 Black Sash march by 20,000 women. An all-day event was held on London’s South Bank in 2013, which included theatre and film performances produced by Body Gossip, an organisation that campaigns on body image and mental health issues. For the first Day of the Girl, a virtual event was developed by Sage Girl and iTwixie to bring thousands of individuals and organizations together online.

national Coming-Out Day

National Coming Out Day (NCOD) is an annual LGBTQ awareness day observed on October 11 and October 12 in some parts of the world. Founded in the United States in 1988, the initial idea was grounded in the feminist and gay liberation spirit of the personal being political, and the emphasis on the most basic form of activism being coming out to family, friends and colleagues, and living life as an openly lesbian or gay person. The foundational belief is that homophobia thrives in an atmosphere of silence and ignorance, and that once people know that they have loved ones who are lesbian or gay, they are far less likely to maintain homophobic or oppressive views. In more recent years, the idea of the “lesbian and gay community” has been largely subsumed into the idea of the LGBT community, and the idea of “coming out” expanded to not only include the voluntary self-disclosure of a lesbian, gay, or bisexual sexual orientation, but also transgender, genderqueer, or other non-mainstream gender identity.

NCOD was founded in 1988 by Robert Eichberg and Jean O’Leary. Eichberg, who died in 1995 of complications from AIDS, was a psychologist from New Mexico and founder of the personal growth workshop, The Experience. O’Leary was an openly lesbian political leader and long-time activist from New York, and was at the time the head of the National Gay Rights Advocates in Los Angeles. Queer activists, including Eichberg and O’Leary, did not want to respond defensively to anti-LGBT action because they believed it would be predictable. This caused them to found NCOD in order to maintain positivity and celebrate coming out. The date of October 11 was chosen because it is the anniversary of the 1987 National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights.

National Coming Out Day is observed annually to celebrate coming out and to raise awareness of the LGBT community and civil rights movement. The first decades of observances were marked by private and public people coming out, often in the media, to raise awareness and let the mainstream know that everyone knows at least one person who is lesbian or gay. In more recent years, when coming out as a lesbian or gay man is now far less risky in most Western countries, the day is more of a holiday. Participants often wear pride symbols such as pink triangles and rainbow flags.

National Coming Out Day is also observed in Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States, where the Human Rights Campaign sponsors NCOD events under the auspices of their National Coming Out Project, offering resources to LGBT individuals, couples, parents, and children, as well as straight friends and relatives, to promote awareness of LGBT families living honest and open lives. Candace Gingrich became the spokesperson for NCOD in April 1995. Since 1999, the Human Rights Campaign has announced a theme to go with every NCOD. The following is a list of most of the themes from 1999 to 2014

International Newspaper Carrier Day

International Newspaper Carrier Day is celebrated annually on 11 October. It was created by the Newspaper Association of America and celebrated in October. The day is scheduled in association with the Newspaper Association Managers’ National Newspaper Week. National Newspaper Week is celebrated during the first full week in October (Sun-Sat), and Newspaper Carrier Day is observed on the Saturday of that week. Newspapers Canada (the national association representing the newspaper industry in Canada) also observes this particular date, noting newspapers may choose to observe the day by running an ad, or organizing special events or activities. The purpose of National Newspaper Week and Newspaper Carrier Day is to highlight the contributions that newspapers, their staff and carriers make to gather and deliver the news to their communities.

The Paperboy (Papergirl) was an iconic role of youngsters, often their first job. A paperboy’s task was to distribute printed newspapers to homes or offices of subscribers on a regular route, usually by bicycle or automobile. This has often been a before-school or after-school job for adolescents. (Contrast with the newsboy or newspaper hawker, now extremely rare in Western nations, who would sell newspapers to passersby on the street, often with very vocal promotion. They were common when multiple daily papers in every city—as many as 50 in New York City—competed for sales each day.)

The position of paperboy occupies a prominent place in the popular culture of many countries, including the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and Japan. This is because it has long been the first paying job available to young teenagers, often male. The number of paperboys has declined dramatically in recent years. This is due partly to the disappearance of afternoon newspapers, whose delivery times worked better for school-aged children than did those of morning papers which were typically delivered before 6 a.m. The numbers have also been affected by changing demographics, the availability of news and newspapers on the internet, employment laws and concern about the safety of un-escorted children, all of which have led many newspapers to switch to delivery by adults. Today, they are mainly used by weekly community newspapers and free shopper papers, which still tend to be delivered in the afternoons. Alternatively, sometimes paperboys are only employed once a week to deliver the paper on Sunday. Newspaper industry lore suggests that the first paperboy, hired in 1833, was 10-year-old Barney Flaherty who answered an advertisement in the New York Sun, which read “To the Unemployed a number of steady men can find employment by vending this paper.”