Knights of the Damned

Being a fan of Game of Thrones, I have recently watched this exciting and rather Blood thirsty Television movie fantasy adventure to see how it compares. It is Set in the mythical kingdom of Nazroth which is being ravaged by dark forces and is being besieged by a fearsome dragon. So the reigning King Xalavadore of Nazroth sends twelve of his best Knights to defeat the dragon.

However this mission is fraught with many dangers as they must avoid being killed by the dragon, avoid being bewitched by sinister water sirens and avoid being eaten by an army of flesh eating undead zombies called Furies, who have been revived by sinister dark magic and are currently ravaging the land killing people.

On the way They also encounter a race of fearsome Barbarian warrior women who are also on a quest of their own for revenge against the King’s villainous Son who isn’t what he seems, and has a sinister agenda of his own concerning the dragon. So the Knights and the female warriors team up in an effort to stop the kingdom being overrun by zombies or being destroyed by the dragon. Meanwhile unseen sinister forces are also at work and soon there is even more to worry about. Knights of the Damned is part of a series and is followed by The Dark Kingdom.

MURDER AT THE UNIVERSITY by Faith Martin

I would like to read This gripping crime mystery novel, which is book two in the Hillary Greene series. It features DEtective Inspector Hillary Greene An attractive Police woman in her forties, who works for the Oxford Police department and has a thirst for justice. Hillary Greene has many years’ experience, and came up through the ranks. Consequently, she knows how the system works, and is fiercely loyal to the force without being blinkered to its faults. She is a long-standing friend of her immediate superior officer, ‘Mellow’ Mallow and enjoys a rather enigmatic relationship with the steely Superintendent Marcus Donleavy. Popular with the rank and file for her no-nonsense attitude and competence. However She is somewhat startled by the re-appearance of the investigating officer Paul, who was involved in her husbands misdemeanours and she’s worried that he may be investigating her again on the quiet Despite the fact that the previous internal investigation had cleared her of any collusion in her ex husband’s illegal dealings

Oxford is a city of two halves — town and gown. In the town, you have Cornmarket street full of shops and shoppers that could be found in any city in the country. But Oxford’s ‘dreaming spires’ are the real draw for the tourists, romantics and those with intellectual aspirations to wear the gowns of students and dons. In centuries-old quads, croquet can still be played on lawns as smooth as velvet. Here, ‘New’ College’s walls are actually over 500 years old, and Cotswold stone gleams in even the wateriest of winter sunlight. A city of bicycles, with undergraduates (and fellows) flapping about in faded, black gowns; the Martyrs’ Memorial, and fabled inns where the likes of J.R.R Tolkien sat and wrote about a Hobbit who lived in a hole in the ground. Everywhere you turn, you see history staring back at you. And of course there has always been murder! Edmund Crispin wrote his novels here, and it was here that Dorothy L. Sayers (who attended Somerville College) began to create her aristocratic sleuth, Lord Peter Wimsey. And of course, Oxford is the city of Morse. And now there’s been another murder within the walls of St Anselms!

Detective Hillary Greene is asked to look into a suspicious death at St Anselm’s, a private college in Oxford where a young French student has been found dead in her bed from an apparent drugs overdose. Everyone thinks it is another tragic case of accidental drug overdose. However Detective Hillary Greene has a nose for the truth and she quickly discovers that the student was involved in some very unusual activities With a shocking cause of death found, the case becomes a high-profile murder investigation.

DCI Philip ‘Mellow’ Mallow also works with her at the station. Mel appreciates Hillary’s first-rate ability to solve her cases, and isn’t happy about her harassment by the officers from York. Known for his sartorial elegance and laid-back manners, he has a sharp mind, and an eye for the ladies. A good friend and ally for Hillary in her recent tribulations, he’s determined to keep his best investigator focused on the problems at hand. So Detective Inspector Hilary Greene and DCI Philip Mallow investigate the murder…

Vigilante Angles by Billy de Carlo

The boxed set of the complete Vigilante Angels trilogy is available in paperback, Kindle ebook, and audiobook. And is Available free gratis on Kindle Unlimited. Vigilante Angels is A dark, gritty, noir crime novel series, which concerns a retired cop and former Marine named Tommy, who has cancer and realizes he can kill without consequences, and he’s got a list, so he turns vigilante. His hit list Including A hateful, divisive presidential candidate, a pedophile priest, and a corrupt cop He also enlists the help of an unlikely cast of unusual fellow patients to target his hit list.

In book one of this trilogy, Tommy befriends a black ex-con who is a fellow patient. As both seek redemption for their past misdeeds, and with nothing to lose, they set their sights on a priest who is accused of molesting children. Unfortunately The hardest battles, the ones Tommy hadn’t counted on, are right in his own home: an alcoholic, unfaithful wife and bringing himself to accept his son’s sexuality.

In book two of this trilogy, Tommy finds himself under investigation by a racist, corrupt cop who torments Tommy and his family until the unthinkable happens. So Tommy partners with a one-eyed Korean martial-arts expert and a black motorcycle gang to seek revenge.

In the exciting conclusion of the Vigilante Angels trilogy, Tommy finds himself on the run and hiding in the Florida Keys. He’s prepared to let his disease claim him and die in peace. That is until he finds love and a mysterious rejuvenation. He begins to follow the meteoric rise of a politician that stands for everything he despises and sees one last chance to make the world a better place before dies. He battles alcoholism, love, cancer, FBI investigators, neo-Nazis, and many unexpected obstacles to complete one last mission In the race against time, which will prevail?

Freethought Day

Freethought Day is held annually on October 12, by freethinkers and secularists to commemorate the anniversary of the effective end of the Salem Witch Trials. The seminal event connected to Freethought Day is a letter written by then Massachusetts Governor William Phips in which he wrote to the Privy Council of the British monarchs, William and Mary, on this day in 1692. In this correspondence he outlined the quagmire that the trials had degenerated into, in part by a reliance on “evidence” of a non-objective nature and especially “spectral evidence” in which the accusers claimed to see devils and other phantasms consorting with the accused. Note that, contrary to what has been claimed by some, there was no specific order or edict by Phips to ban “spectral evidence” from all legal proceedings. Rather, this was one concern that brought about Phips’ stopping the proceedings.

When the trials ultimately resumed, “spectral evidence” was allowed but was largely discounted and those convicted were swiftly pardoned by Phips. In the time leading up to the trials being stopped, it was actually clerics including the famous Cotton Mather, often portrayed as the chief villain in the hysteria, who took the lead in advising cautions against the use of “spectral evidence.” The Rev. Increase Mather, Cotton’s father, specifically condemned “spectral evidence” in his book ‘Cases of Conscience’, in which he stated that, “It were better that ten suspected witches should escape, than that one Innocent Person should be Condemned.” It was this shift in sentiment, no doubt aided by the escalating hysteria and the fact that accusations were beginning to reach higher into the Massachusetts Bay Colony hierarchy, that led to Phips’ action.

Freethought Week is often observed during the week in which October 12th falls or Freethought Month during October. Organizers of these events are hoping to show the public that atheists are just like everyone else, that they are involved in the community and family-friendly. Since 2002, Freethought Day has been observed in Sacramento as a free event, open to the public and held outdoors. Dubbed a “festival of reason” the annual event often features live entertainment and speakers similar to a rally, and is funded through a dinner or reception. “(Freethought Day) is really all about the celebration of the separation of church and state. We also celebrate the First Amendment, and science, and reason and progress” according to the event’s organizer, David Diskin.

The 2007 event held at Waterfront Park started with a reading of the Phipps letter. Bands, speakers, bounce house and more, “It’s just a chance for us to show people we don’t have horns and tails” Mayer Heather Fargo issued a proclamation for Freethought Day in Sacramento. In 2016, the event was renamed “California Freethought Day” to reflect the growth of the event spanning the last 15 years. Several hundred attended in 2016, with the theme “#SecularPride”.

Luciano Pavarotti

Italian operatic tenor Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI was born 12 October 1932. After abandoning the dream of becoming a football goalkeeper, Pavarotti spent seven years in vocal training. Pavarotti’s earliest musical influences were his father’s recordings, most of them featuring the popular tenors of the day – Beniamino Gigli, Giovanni Martinelli, Tito Schipa, and Enrico Caruso. Pavarotti’s favourite tenor and idol was Giuseppe Di Stefano. He was also deeply influenced by Mario Lanza, saying, “In my teens I used to go to Mario Lanza movies and then come home and imitate him in the mirror”. At around the age of nine he began singing with his father in a small local church choir. He graduated from the Scuola Magistrale and After training to be a teacher he subsequently began teaching, but finally allowed his interest in music to win out and began the serious study of music in 1954 at the age of 19 with Arrigo Pola, a respected teacher and professional tenor in Modena who offered to teach him without remuneration.In 1955, he experienced his first singing success when he was a member of the Corale Rossini, a male voice choir from Modena that also included his father, which won first prize at the International Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales. He later said that this was the most important experience of his life, and that it inspired him to become a professional singer.At about this time Pavarotti first met Adua Veroni. They married in 1961.

Pavarotti began his career as a tenor in smaller regional Italian opera houses, making his debut as Rodolfo in La bohème at the Teatro Municipale in Reggio Emilia in April 1961.with Joan Sutherland in I puritani (1976). He made his first international appearance in La traviata in Belgrade, Yugoslavia anddebuted at the Vienna State Opera in the same role. In 1963 Pavarotti again played Rodolfo and Duca di Mantova in Rigoletto in vienna and also sang in Dundalk, Ireland for the St Cecilia’s Gramophone Society and made his Royal Opera House debut, as Rodolfo.He got a lucky break when Joan Sutherland (and her conductor husband, Richard Bonynge), were looking for a young tenor taller than herself to take along on her tour to Australia.With his commanding physical presence, Pavarotti proved ideal.The two sang some forty performances over two months, .Pavarotti made his American début with the Greater Miami Opera in February 1965, singing in Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor opposite Joan Sutherland on the stage of the Miami-Dade County Auditorium in Miami. Sutherland recommended the young Pavarotti as he was well acquainted with the role.,

Pavarotti made his La Scala debut in the revival of the famousFranco Zeffirelli production of La bohème, with his childhood friend Mirella Freni singing Mimi and Herbert von Karajan conducting. Karajan had requested the singer’s engagement. After an extended Australian tour, he returned to La Scala, where he added Tebaldo from I Capuleti e i Montecchi to his repertoire , with Giacomo Aragall as Romeo. His first appearance as Tonio in Donizetti’s La fille du régiment took place at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. It was his performances of this role that would earn him the title of “King of the High Cs”.He scored another major triumph in Rome when he sang in I Lombardi opposite Renata Scotto. Early commercial recordings included a recital of Donizetti (the aria from Don Sebastiano) and Verdi arias, as well as a complete L’elisir d’amore with Sutherland.His major breakthrough in the United States came on 17 February 1972, in a production of La fille du régiment at New York’sMetropolitan Opera, in which he drove the crowd into a frenzy with his nine effortless high Cs in the signature aria. He achieved a record seventeen curtain calls

Pavarotti sang his international recital début at William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, 1973, as part of the college’s Fine Arts Program, now known as the Harriman-Jewell Series.He began to give frequent television performances, starting with his performances as Rodolfo (La bohème) in the first Live from the Mettelecast in March 1977, and won many Grammy awards and platinum and gold discs for his performances.In 1976, Pavarotti debuted at the Salzburg Festival, appearing in a solo recital on 31 July, accompanied by pianist Leone Magiera. Pavarotti returned to the festival in 1978 with a recital and as the Italian singer in Der Rosenkavalier in 1983 with Idomeneo, and both in 1985 and 1988 with solo recitals.In 1979, he was profiled in a cover story in the weekly magazine Time. That same year saw Pavarotti’s return to the Vienna State Opera after an absence of fourteen years. With Herbert von Karajan conducting, Pavarotti sang Manrico in Il trovatore. In 1978, he appeared in a solo recital on Live from Lincoln Center.

In the 1980s, he set up The Pavarotti International Voice Competition for young singers, performing with the winners in 1982 in excerpts of La bohème and L’elisir d’amore. The second competition, in 1986, staged excerpts of La bohème and Un ballo in maschera. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of his career, he brought the winners to gala performances of La bohème in Modena and Genoa, and then to China where they staged performances of La bohème in Beijing (Peking). To conclude the visit, Pavarotti performed the inaugural concert in the Great Hall of the People before 10,000 people, receiving a standing ovation for nine effortless high Cs. The third competition in 1989 staged performances of L’elisir d’amore and Un ballo in maschera. The winners of the fifth competition accompanied Pavarotti in performances in Philadelphia in 1997.In the mid-1980s, Pavarotti returned to, the Vienna State Opera and La Scala. Vienna playing the role of Rodolfo in La bohème with Carlos Kleiber conducting and again Mirella Freni was Mimi; as Nemorino in L’elisir d’amore; he was also cast as Radames in Aida conducted by Lorin Maazel; as Rodolfo in Luisa Miller; and as Gustavo in Un ballo in maschera. In 1996, Pavarotti appeared for the last time at the Staatsoper in Andrea Chénier.In 1985, Pavarotti sang Radames at La Scala opposite Maria Chiara in a Luca Ronconi production conducted by Maazel, recorded on video. His performance of the aria “Celeste Aida” received a two-minute ovation on the opening night. He was reunited with Mirella Freni for the San Francisco Opera production of La bohème in 1988, also recorded on video. In 1992, La Scala saw Pavarotti in a new Zeffirelli production of Don Carlos, conducted by Riccardo Muti.

Pavarotti became even better known throughout the world in 1990 when his rendition of the aria “Nessun Dorma” from Giacomo Puccini’s Turandot was taken as the theme song of BBC’s TV coverage of the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy. The aria achieved pop status and remained his trademark song. This was followed by the hugely successful Three Tenors concert, held on the eve of the World Cup final at the ancient Baths of Caracalla in Rome with fellow tenors Plácido Domingo and José Carreras and conductor Zubin Mehta, which became the biggest selling classical record of all time. A highlight of the concert, in which Pavarotti hammed up a famous portion of di Capua’s “O Sole Mio” and was mimicked by Domingo and Carreras to the delight of the audience, became one of the most memorable moments in contemporary operatic history. Throughout the 1990s, Pavarotti appeared in many well-attended outdoor concerts, including his televised concert in London’s Hyde Park, which drew a record attendance of 150,000. In June 1993, more than 500,000 listeners gathered for his free performance on the Great Lawn of New York’s Central Park, while millions more around the world watched on television. The following September, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, he sang for an estimated crowd of 300,000. Following on from the original 1990 concert, the Three Tenors concerts were held during the Football World Cups: in Los Angeles in 1994, in Paris in 1998, and in Yokohama in 2002.In 1995, Pavarotti’s friends, the singer Lara Saint Paul (as Lara Cariaggi) and her husband showman Pier Quinto Cariaggi, who had produced and organised Pavarotti’s 1990 FIFA World Cup Celebration Concert at the PalaTrussardi in Milan produced and wrote the television documentary The Best is Yet to Come, in which Pavarotti spoke candidly about his life and career. On 12 December 1998, he became the first (and, to date, only) opera singer to perform on Saturday Night Live, singing alongsideVanessa L. Williams. He also sang with U2 in the band’s 1995 song “Miss Sarajevo” and with Mercedes Sosa in a big concert at theBoca Juniors arena La Bombonera in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

He has received an enormous number of awards and honours, including Grammy Legend Award. and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2001. He also holds two Guinness World Records: one for receiving the most curtain callsand another for the best-selling classical album (In Concert by The Three Tenors). (The latter record is thus shared by fellow tenors Plácido Domingo and José Carreras.)In late 2003, he released his final compilation—and his first and only “crossover” album, Ti Adoro. Most of the 13 songs were written and produced by Michele Centonze, who had already helped produce the “Pavarotti & Friends” concerts between 1998 and 2000.[20] The tenor described the album as a wedding gift to Nicoletta Mantovani. That same year he was made a Commander of Monaco’s Order of Cultural Merit.[21]Pavarotti began his farewell tour in 2004, at the age of 69, performing one last time in old and new locations, after more than four decades on the stage. On 13 March 2004, Pavarotti gave his last performance in an opera at the New York Metropolitan Opera, for which he received a long standing ovation for his role as the painter Mario Cavaradossi in Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca. On 1 December 2004, he announced a 40-city farewell tour. Pavarotti and his manager, Terri Robson, commissioned impresario Harvey Goldsmith to produce the Worldwide Farewell Tour.

His last full-scale performance was at the end of a two-month Australasian tour in Taiwan in December 2005.In March 2005, Pavarotti underwent neck surgery to repair two vertebrae. In early 2006, he underwent further back surgery and contracted an infection while in the hospital in New York, forcing cancellation of concerts in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K.On 10 February 2006, Pavarotti sang “Nessun Dorma” at the 2006 Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Turin, Italy, at his final performance. In the last act of the opening ceremony, his performance received the longest and loudest ovation of the night from the international crowd. Leone Magiera, who directed the performance, revealed in his 2008 memoirs, Pavarotti Visto da Vicino, that the performance was prerecorded weeks earlier. “The orchestra pretended to play for the audience, I pretended to conduct and Luciano pretended to sing. The effect was wonderful,” he wrote. Pavarotti’s manager, Terri Robson, said that the tenor had turned the Winter Olympic Committee’s invitation down several times because it would have been impossible to sing late at night in the subzero conditions of Turin in February. The committee eventually persuaded him to take part by prerecording the song.

Pavarotti annually hosted the “Pavarotti and Friends” charity concerts in Modena in Italy, joining with singers including Andrea Bocelli, Jon Bon Jovi, Bryan Adams, Bono, James Brown, Mariah Carey, Eric Clapton,Sheryl Crow, Céline Dion, Anastacia, Elton John, Deep Purple, Meat Loaf, Queen, George Michael, Sting and the Spice Girls, to raise money for several UN causes. Concerts were held for War Child, and victims of war and civil unrest in Bosnia, Guatemala, Kosovo and Iraq. After the war in Bosnia, he financed and established the Pavarotti Music Centre in the southern city of Mostar to offer Bosnia’s artists the opportunity to develop their skills. For these contributions, the city of Sarajevo named him an honorary citizen. He performed at benefit concerts to raise money for victims of tragedies such as the Spitak earthquake that killed 25,000 people in northern Armenia in December 1988, and sang Gounod’s Ave Maria with legendary French pop music star and ethnic Armenian Charles Aznavour.He was a close friend of Diana, Princess of Wales. They raised money for the elimination of land mines worldwide. He was invited to sing at her funeral service, but declined to sing, as he felt he could not sing well “with his grief in his throat”. Nonetheless, he attended the service.

In 1998, he was appointed the United Nations Messenger of Peace, using his fame to raise awareness of UN issues, including theMillennium Development Goals, HIV/AIDS, child rights, urban slums and poverty.In 1999, Pavarotti performed a charity benefit concert in Beirut, to mark Lebanon’s reemergence on the world stage after a brutal 15 year civil war. The largest concert held in Beirut since the end of the war, it was attended by 20,000 people who travelled from countries as distant as Saudi Arabia and Bulgaria.In 2001, Pavarotti received the Nansen Medal from the UN High Commission for Refugees for his efforts raising money on behalf ofrefugees worldwide. Through benefit concerts and volunteer work, he has raised more than any other individual.Other honours he received include the “Freedom of London Award” and The Red Cross “Award for Services to Humanity”, for his work in raising money for that organization, and the 1998 “MusiCares Person of the Year”, given to humanitarian heroes by the National Academy of Recording Arts and SciencesHe was a National Patron of Delta Omicron, an international professional music fraternity.

While undertaking an international “farewell tour,” in 2006 Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The tenor had major abdominal surgery and made plans for the resumption and conclusion of his singing commitments. However he eventually succumbed And Pavarotti sadly died 6 September 2007 at the age of 71 following a long, tough battle against pancreatic cancer. In fitting with the approach that characterized his life and work, he remained positive until finally succumbing to the last stages of his illness”. Pavarotti’s funeral was held in Modena Cathedral. Romano Prodi and Kofi Annan attended. The Frecce Tricolori aerobatic demonstration team of the Italian Air Force, flew overhead, leaving green-white-red smoke trails. After a funeral procession through the centre of Modena, Pavarotti’s coffin was taken to Montale Rangone, a village part of Castelnuovo Rangone, and was entombed in the Pavarotti family crypt.

Rick Parfitt OBE

The late great Rick Parfitt OBE was born 12 October 1948. He is best known for being a singer and rhythm guitarist in the English rock band Status Quo. Born in Woking, Surrey, Parfitt attended Goldsworth School, Woking and first met band member Francis Rossi in 1965 in Butlin’s Minehead whilst he was playing as Ricky Harrison in a musical trio called ‘The Highlights’. Rossi was playing with the Spectres (forerunner of Status Quo) at the time and Parfitt was sufficiently impressed to approach him with a view to working together. Nothing came of the meeting until 1967 when Parfitt joined Rossi, Alan Lancaster, John Coghlan and Roy Lynes to form the first lineup of the band under the name “Status Quo”. Their music was characterized by their distinctive brand of boogie rock . After a number of lineup changes, the band became The Status Quo in 1967 and Status Quo in 1969. They have had over 60 chart hits in the UK, starting with 1967’s Psychedelic Rock hit Pictures Of Matchstick Men, ”.

Parfitt has been a continuous member of the group, and has penned some of their greatest hits, sometimes in collaboration with the group’s keyboard player Andy Bown, among them “Whatever You Want”, “Again and Again”, and “Rain”. He recorded a solo album in 1985, but it was never released. Among musicians on the record were bassist John Edwards and drummer Jeff Rich, formerly with the Climax Blues Band and Judie Tzuke. He has earned the nickname ‘The WOMORR’ (The Wild Old Man of Rock ‘n’ Roll). Parfitt is known for his trademark white Fender Telecaster – a 1965 model . In 2006, Parfitt released his invention, the “guitar facelift” which has the backing of guitar manufacturer Fender .On 16 June 2007, the presenters of the British children’s television show, Tiswas, reunited for a special one-off show. Parfitt performed with the rest of Status Quo on the show (all of whom were constantly plagued by the show’s trademark practical jokes during their performance), and presenter Chris Tarrant alleged that during a broadcast of the show in the early 1980s, Parfitt was smoking cannabis on live children’s television.On 15 September 2007, Parfitt and Rossi appeared on Celebrity Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, earning £50,000 for charity.

In December 2009, Parfitt teamed up with Rolf Harris for the single “Christmas in the Sun”. This follows on from the 2008 Status Quo hit “It’s Christmas Time”, which Parfitt wrote with current songwriting partner Wayne Morris. Twenty two of their songs have reached the UK Top Ten and In 1991, Status Quo received a Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. Status Quo starred in their first feature film Bula Quo! which was released to cinemas in July 2013. The film coincided with the release of the soundtrack album Bula Quo!. The first single from the album, the track Bula Bula Quo was released in June 2013, and is Status Quo’s one hundredth single release.

Rick Parfitt tragically passed away 23 December 2016 at a hospital in Marbella, Spain as a result of a severe infection, having been admitted to hospital on Thursday evening following complications to a shoulder injury incurred by a previous fall. Rick is survived by his wife Lyndsay, their twins Tommy and Lily and Rick’s adult children Rick Jnr and Harry.

Hitch hikers guide to the the Galaxy

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (sometimes referred to as HG2G,HHGTTG or H2G2 was originally published 11 October 1979. The novels are described as “a trilogy in five parts”, having been described as a trilogy on the release of the third book, and then a “trilogy in four parts” on the release of the fourth book. The US edition of the fifth book was originally released with the legend “The fifth book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhiker’s Trilogy” on the cover.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
In The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (published in 1979), the characters visit the legendary planet Magrathea, home to the now-collapsed planet-building industry, and meet Slartibartfast, a planetary coastline designer who was responsible for the fjords of Norway. Through archival recordings, he relates the story of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who built a computer named Deep Thought to calculate the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. When the answer was revealed to be 42, Deep Thought explained that the answer was incomprehensible because the beings didn’t know what they were asking. It went on to predict that another computer, more powerful than itself would be made and designed by it to calculate the question for the answer. (Later on, referencing this, Adams would create the 42 Puzzle, a puzzle which could be approached in multiple ways, all yielding the answer 42.)

The computer, often mistaken for a planet (because of its size and use of biological components), was the Earth, and was destroyed by Vogons to make way for a hyperspatial express route five minutes before the conclusion of its 10-million-year program. Two members of the race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who commissioned the Earth in the first place disguise themselves as Trillian’s mice, and want to dissect Arthur’s brain to help reconstruct the question, since he was part of the Earth’s matrix moments before it was destroyed, and so he is likely to have part of the question buried in his brain. Trillian is also human but had left Earth six months previously with Zaphod Beeblebrox, President of the Galaxy. The protagonists escape, setting course for “The Restaurant at the End of the Universe”.

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (published in 1980), Zaphod is separated from the others and finds he is part of a conspiracy to uncover who really runs the Universe. Zaphod meets Zarniwoop, a conspirator and editor for The Guide, who knows where to find the secret ruler. Zaphod becomes briefly reunited with the others for a trip to Milliways, the restaurant of the title. Zaphod and Ford decide to steal a ship from there, which turns out to be a stunt ship pre-programmed to plunge into a star as a special effect in a stage show. Unable to change course, the main characters get Marvin to run the teleporter they find in the ship, which is working other than having no automatic control (someone must remain behind to operate it), and Marvin seemingly sacrifices himself. Zaphod and Trillian discover that the Universe is in the safe hands of a simple man living on a remote planet in a wooden shack with his cat.

Ford and Arthur, meanwhile, end up on a spacecraft full of the outcasts of the Golgafrinchan civilisation. The ship crashes on prehistoric Earth; Ford and Arthur are stranded, and it becomes clear that the inept Golgafrinchans are the ancestors of modern humans, having displaced the Earth’s indigenous hominids. This has disrupted the Earth’s programming so that when Ford and Arthur manage to extract the final readout from Arthur’s subconscious mind by pulling lettered tiles from a Scrabble set, it is “What do you get if you multiply six by nine?” Arthur then comments, “I’ve always said there was something fundamentally wrong with the universe.”

Life, the Universe and Everything
In Life, the Universe and Everything (published in 1982), Ford and Arthur travel through the space-time continuum from prehistoric Earth to Lord’s Cricket Ground. There they run into Slartibartfast, who enlists their aid in preventing galactic war. Long ago, the people of Krikkit attempted to wipe out all life in the Universe, but they were stopped and imprisoned on their home planet; now they are poised to escape. With the help of Marvin, Zaphod and Trillian, they prevent the destruction of life in the Universe and go their separate ways.

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
In So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (published in 1984), Arthur returns home to Earth, rather surprisingly since it was destroyed when he left. He meets and falls in love with a girl named Fenchurch, and discovers this Earth is a replacement provided by the dolphins in their Save the Humans campaign. Eventually he rejoins Ford, who claims to have saved the Universe in the meantime, to hitch-hike one last time and see God’s Final Message to His Creation. Along the way, they are joined by Marvin, the Paranoid Android, who, although 37 times older than the universe itself (what with time travel and all), has just enough power left in his failing body to read the message and feel better about it all before expiring

Mostly Harmless
Finally, in Mostly Harmless (published in 1992), Vogons take over The Hitchhiker’s Guide (under the name of InfiniDim Enterprises), to finish, once and for all, the task of obliterating the Earth. After abruptly losing Fenchurch and travelling around the galaxy despondently, Arthur’s spaceship crashes on the planet Lamuella, where he settles in happily as the official sandwich-maker for a small village of simple, peaceful people. Meanwhile, Ford Prefect breaks into The Guide’s offices, gets himself an infinite expense account from the computer system, and then meets The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Mark II, an artificially intelligent, multi-dimensional guide with vast power and a hidden purpose. After he declines this dangerously powerful machine’s aid (which he receives anyway), he sends it to Arthur Dent for safety.

Trillian uses DNA that Arthur donated for travelling money to have a daughter, and when she goes to cover a war, she leaves her daughter Random Frequent Flyer Dent with Arthur. Random, a more than typically troubled teenager, steals The Guide Mark II and uses it to get to Earth. Arthur, Ford, Trillian, and Tricia McMillan (Trillian in this alternate universe) follow her to a crowded club, where an anguished Random becomes startled by a noise and inadvertently fires her gun at Arthur. The shot misses Arthur and kills a man (the ever-unfortunate Agrajag). Immediately afterwards, The Guide Mark II causes the removal of all possible Earths from probability. All of the main characters, save Zaphod, were on Earth at the time and are apparently killed, bringing a good deal of satisfaction to the Vogons.

And Another Thing…by Eoin Colfer
The story begins as death rays bear down on Earth, and the characters awaken from a virtual reality. Zaphod picks them up shortly before they are killed, but completely fails to escape the death beams. They are then saved by Bowerick Wowbagger, the Infinitely Prolonged, whom they agree to help kill. Zaphod travels to Asgard to get Thor’s help. In the meantime, the Vogons are heading to destroy a colony of people who also escaped Earth’s destruction, on the planet Nano. Arthur, Wowbagger, Trillian and Random head to Nano to try to stop the Vogons, and on the journey, Wowbagger and Trillian fall in love, making Wowbagger question whether or not he wants to be killed.

Zaphod arrives with Thor, who then signs up to be the planet’s God. With Random’s help, Thor almost kills Wowbagger. Wowbagger, who merely loses his immortality, then marries Trillian. Thor then stops the first Vogon attack, and apparently dies. Meanwhile, Constant Mown, son of Prostetnic Jeltz, convinces his father that the people on the planet are not citizens of Earth, but are, in fact, citizens of Nano, which means that it would be illegal to kill them. As the book draws to a close, Arthur is on his way to check out a possible university for Random, when, during a hyperspace jump, he is flung across alternate universes, has a brief encounter with Fenchurch, and ends up exactly where he would want to be. However the Vogons turn up again.