Post-Apocalyptic Nomadic Warriors (A Duck & Cover Adventure Post-Apocalyptic Series Book 1) by Benjamin Wallace.

Being a big fan of both Discworld and Hitch Hikers guide to the Galaxy, I would like to read the post apocalyptic dystopian science-fiction spoof Post-Apocalyptic Nomadic Warriors. This is book one in the Duck & Cover Post-Apocalyptic Adventure Series by Benjamin Wallace. It is available Free gratis from Amazon Kindle Unlimited and sounds hilarious. This humorous story is Set in a Dystopian post apocalyptic town of New Hope, where post-apocalyptic life has been pretty good with significantly less traffic and pollution, until the peace is shattered when a group of Vicious raiders, turn up and run amok, threatening their peaceful existence with a giant death truck. So the locals turn to a post-apocalyptic warrior to help.

As luck would have it, two warriors have come looking for work. Logan is hired to protect the town while Jerry and his mastiff are turned away to face the perils of the wasteland. However Logan turns out to be rather different from what they were expecting is a somewhat reluctant road warrior. As if this wasn’t bad enough Logan also finds himself having to deal with super smart bears.

Architects of Destiny (Cadicle #1): by Amy DuBoff

I would like to readArchitects of Destiny which is book one of an epic space opera series which is availableFree Gratis on Amazon Kindle Unlimited. It is the first installment in the complete, seven-book Cadicle series by Amy Duboff, and is followed by the novels Veil of reality, Bonds of resolve, web of truth, Crossroads of Fate and Scions of change.

It is described as a modern-day space opera epic in the spirit of Heinlein, Herbert, and McCaffrey. This fast-paced space adventure with intrigue, coming-of-age, and romance is a short prequel to the defining events in Tararia’s history in the ensuing years. Tararia is a world run by 6 grand houses (industrial monopolies) and a priesthood who all claim to act as the voice of reason. The Agents of the Tararian Selective Service (TSS) use their telekinetic and telepathic abilities to maintain interstellar order, unbeknownst to those on the lost colony of Earth.

It features a chap named Cris Sietinen, who is heir to the most influential High Dynasty in the Taran empire, and was born with rare telekinetic gifts–abilities he refuses to ignore, regardless of the governing Priesthood’s decrees. Determined to be true to himself, and test the limits of his prohibited abilities,

So sixteen-year-old Cris decides to escape his stifled life of business and politics on Tararia and joins cargo ship Exler’s crew as navigator hoping to begin an exciting new life of adventure exploring the stars. Then Cris unexpectedly receives an invitation to join the Tararian Selective Service (TSS), the only organization to offer a sanctioned telekinesis training program, a new future awaits. It’s his dream opportunity to be among people like himself, free from the Priesthood and political objectives. However things are not what what they seem…

World Standards Day

World Standards Day (or International Standards Day) is celebrated internationally each year on 14 October, in order to recognize the efforts of the thousands of experts who develop voluntary standards within standards development organizations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

International standards are standards developed by international standards organizations. International standards are available for consideration and use worldwide. The most prominent organization is the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). One purpose of International standards Is to overcome technical barriers in international commerce caused by differences among technical regulations and standards developed independently and separately by each nation, national standards organization, or company. Technical barriers arise when different groups come together, each with a large user base, doing some well established thing which between them is mutually incompatible. Establishing international standards is one way of preventing or overcoming this problem.

International standards may be used either by direct application or by a process of modifying an international standard to suit local conditions. The adoption of international standards results in the creation of equivalent, national standards that are substantially the same as international standards in technical content, but may have (i) editorial differences as to appearance, use of symbols and measurement units, substitution of a point for a comma as the decimal marker, and (ii) differences resulting from conflicts in governmental regulations or industry-specific requirements caused by fundamental climatic, geographical, technological, or infrastructural factors, or the stringency of safety requirements that a given standard authority considers appropriate.

The aim of World Standards Day is to raise awareness among regulators, industry and consumers as to the importance of standardization to the global economy. The date of 14 October was specifically chosen to mark the occasion, in 1946, when delegates from 25 countries first gathered in London and decided to create an international organization focused on facilitating standardization. Even though ISO was formed one year later, it wasn’t until 1970 that the first World Standards Day was celebrated.

Around the globe, various activities are chosen by national bodies to commemorate the date. The United States held a 2014 U.S. Celebration of World Standards Day on 23 October 2014. The Standards Council of Canada (SCC), Canada’s national accreditation body, celebrates World Standards Day together with the international community by observing the day near the dates of the international observance. In 2012 SCC celebrated World Standards Day on Friday, 12 October.

Benoit B.Mandelbrot

French American mathematician Benoît B. Mandelbrot Sadly died in a hospice in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on 14th October 2010 from pancreatic cancer, at the age of 85. He was born 20 November 1924 in Poland, but moved to France with his family when he was a child. Mandelbrot spent much of his life living and working in the United States, and he acquired dual French and American citizenship. Mandelbrot worked on a wide range of mathematical problems, including mathematical physics and quantitative finance, but is best known as the popularizer of fractal geometry. He coined the term fractal and described the Mandelbrot set. Mandelbrot also wrote books and gave lectures aimed at the general public. Mandelbrot spent most of his career at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and was appointed as an IBM Fellow. He later became a Sterling Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Yale University, where he was the oldest professor in Yale’s history to receive tenure. Mandelbrot also held positions at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Université Lille Nord de France, Institute for Advanced Study and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.From 1951 onward, Mandelbrot worked on problems and published papers not only in mathematics but in applied fields such as information theory, economics, and fluid dynamics. He became convinced that two key themes, fat tails and self- similar structure, ran through a situation of problems encountered in those fields.

Mandelbrot found that price changes in financial markets did not follow a Gaussian distribution, but rather Lévy stable distributions having theoretically infinite variance. He found, for example, that cotton prices followed a Lévy stable distribution with parameter α equal to 1.7 rather than 2 as in a Gaussian distribution. “Stable” distributions have the property that the sum of many instances of a random variable follows the same distribution but with a larger scale parameter.Mandelbrot also put his ideas to work in cosmology. He offered in 1974 a new explanation of Olbers’ paradox (the “dark night sky” riddle), demonstrating the consequences of fractal theory as a sufficient, but not necessary, resolution of the paradox. He postulated that if the stars in the universe were fractally distributed (for example, like Cantor dust), it would not be necessary to rely on the Big Bang theory to explain the paradox. His model would not rule out a Big Bang, but would allow for a dark sky even if the Big Bang had not occurred. In 1975, Mandelbrot coined the term fractal to describe these structures, and published his ideas in Fractals: Form, Chance and Dimension.While at Harvard University in 1979, Mandelbrot began to study fractals called Julia sets that were invariant under certain transformations of the complex plane. Building on previous work by Gaston Julia and Pierre Fatou, Mandelbrot used a computer to plot images of the Julia sets of the formula z2 − μ. While investigating how the topology of these Julia sets depended on the complex parameter μ he studied the Mandelbrot set fractal that is now named after him. (Note that the Mandelbrot set is now usually defined in terms of the formula z2 + c, so Mandelbrot’s early plots in terms of the earlier parameter μ are left– right mirror images of more recent plots in terms of the parameter c.) In 1982, Mandelbrot expanded and updated his ideas in The Fractal Geometry of Nature. This influential work brought fractals into the mainstream of professional and popular mathematics, as well as silencing critics, who had dismissed fractals as “program artifacts”.

Mandelbrot left IBM in 1987, when IBM decided to end pure research in his division. He joined the Department of Mathematics at Yale, and obtained his first tenured post in 1999, at the age of 75. At the time of his retirement in 2005, he was Sterling Professor of Mathematical Sciences. His awards include the Wolf Prize for Physics in 1993, the Lewis Fry Richardson Prize of the European Geophysical Society in 2000, the Japan Prize in 2003, and the Einstein Lectureship of the American Mathematical Society in 2006.The small asteroid 27500 Mandelbrot was named in his honor. In November 1990, he was made a Knight in the French Legion of Honour. In December 2005, Mandelbrot was appointed to the position of Battelle Fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Mandelbrot was promoted to Officer of the Legion of Honour in January 2006. An honorary degree from Johns Hopkins University was bestowed on Mandelbrot in the May 2010 commencement exercises. Although Mandelbrot coined the term fractal, some of the mathematical objects he presented in The Fractal Geometry of Nature had been previously described by other mathematicians. Before Mandelbrot, they had often been regarded as isolated curiosities with unnatural and non-intuitive properties. Mandelbrot brought these objects together for the first time and turned them into essential tools for the long-stalled effort to extend the scope of science to non-smooth objects in the real world. He highlighted their common properties, such as self-similarity (linear, non-linear, or statistical), scale invariance, and a (usually) non-integer Hausdorff dimension.He also emphasized the use of fractals as realistic and useful models of many “rough” phenomena in the real world. Natural fractals include the shapes of mountains, coastlines and river basins; the structures of plants, blood vessels and lungs; the clustering of galaxies; and Brownian motion. Fractals are found in human pursuits, such as music, art, architecture, and stock market prices. Mandelbrot believed that fractals, far from being unnatural, were in many ways more intuitive and natural than the artificially smooth objects of traditional Euclidean geometry.

Mandelbrot has been called a visionary and a maverick. His informed & passionate style of writing and his emphasis on visual and geometric intuition (supported bythe inclusion of numerous illustrations) made The Fractal Geometry of Nature accessible to non-specialists. The book sparked widespread popular interest in fractals and contributed to chaos theory and other fields of science and mathematics.When visiting the Museu de la Ciència de Barcelona in 1988, he told its director that the painting The Face of War had given him “the intuition about the transcendence of the fractal geometry when making intelligible the omnipresent similitude in the forms of nature”. He also said that, fractally, Gaudí was superior to Van der Rohe.  The mathematician Heinz-Otto Peitgen said Mandelbrot’s impact inside mathematics, and applications in the sciences, made him one of the most important figures of the last 50 years.

Roger Moore KBE

English actor Sir Roger George Moore KBE  was born 14 October 1927 in Stockwell, London. He attended Battersea Grammar School, but was evacuated to Holsworthy, Devon, during the Second World War, and attended Launceston College school. He was further educated at Dr Challoner’s Grammar School in Amersham, Buckinghamshire and then attended the College of the Venerable Bede at the University of Durham, but did not graduate. At 18, shortly after the end of the Second World War, Moore was conscripted for national service. On 21 September 1946, he was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps as a second lieutenant. He was promoted to captain, commanding a small depot in West Germany and also oversaw entertainers for the armed oforces passing through Hamburg. Immediately prior to his national service, he studied for two terms at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, during which his fees were paid by film director Brian Desmond Hurst, who also used Moore as an extra in his film Trottie True. At RADA, Moore was a classmate of his future Bond co-star Lois Maxwell, (Miss Moneypenny) Moore left RADA after six months in order to seek paid employment as an actor. At the age of 17 Moore appeared as an extra in the film Caesar and Cleopatra alongside Stewart Granger (1945).

During the early 1950s, Moore worked as a model, appearing in print advertisements for knitwear (earning him the amusing nickname “The Big Knit”). Moore’s first television appearance was in 1949 in The Governess by Patrick Hamilton, portraying Bob Drew alongside Clive Morton and Betty Ann Davies. Moore signed with MGM in 1954, appearing in Interrupted Melody—billed third under Glenn Ford and Eleanor Parker—a biographical movie about an opera singer’s recovery from polio and in The King’s Thief starring Ann Blyth, Edmund Purdom, David Niven and George Sanders. He appeared In the 1956 film Diane, portraying Prince Henri alongside Lana Turner and Pedro Armendariz. He also appeared in an episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents in 1959 titled “The Avon Emeralds and starred in The Miracle (1959), alongside Carroll Baker. Moore Moore also appeared in “The Angry Young Man”, an episode of the television series The Third Man starring Michael Rennie as criminal mastermind Harry Lime.

Moore appeared as, Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe, in the TV 1958–59 series Ivanhoe, adapted from Sir Walter Scott’s 1819 romantic novel. Set during the era of Richard the Lionheart, and focussing on Ivanhoe’s conflict with Prince John. The series also featured Robert Brown as the squire Gurth, Peter Gilmore as Waldo Ivanhoe, Andrew Keir as villainous Prince John, and Bruce Seton as noble King Richard. Christopher Lee and John Schlesinger were also among the show’s guest stars. Moore also portrayed “Silky” Harris in the 1959–60 western The Alaskans, set during the Klondike Gold Rush around 1896, alongside Dorothy Provine as Rocky, Jeff York as Reno and Ray Danton as Nifty. He then appeared as “14 Karat John” in the two-part episode “Right Off the Boat” in the drama The Roaring 20s, with Rex Reason, John Dehner, Gary Vinson and Dorothy Provine.

Moore was then cast as Beau Maverick, the English cousin of frontier gamblers Bret Maverick (James Garner), Bart Maverick (Jack Kelly) and Brent Maverick (Robert Colbert) in the series Maverick, debuting as Beau Maverick in “The Bundle From Britain”. He also appeared with Garner, as a different character in a retooling of Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s 1775 comedy of manners play entitled “The Rivals”. Director Robert Altman wrote and directed the episode “Bolt from the Blue” featuring Will Hutchins as a frontier lawyer plus Lee Van Cleef and John Carradine as vicious bank robbers. Leading ladies included Kathleen Crowley Mala Powers, Roxane Berard, Fay Spain, Merry Anders, Andra Martin and Jeanne Cooper. In 1962 Lew Grade cast Moore as Simon Templar in a new and highly successful adaptation of The Saint, based on the novels by Leslie Charteris. This gave Moore international stardom and established his suave, quipping style. Moore also directed several episodes of the later series. The Saint ran from 1962 for six seasons and 118 episodes. Moore also appeared in two films: Crossplot, and The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970) Directed by Basil Dearden. Between 1971 and 1972 Moore starred alongside Tony Curtis in 24 episodes of The Persuaders! Featuring the adventures of two millionaire playboys across Europe. Both True Entertainment andChannel 4 have since repeated The Avengers and The Persuaders!

In 1964 Moore made a guest appearance as suave British Secret Agent James Bond in the comedy series Mainly Millicen. By 1966 Moore became aware that he might be a contender for the role. However, George Lazenby was cast in 1969’s On Her Majesty’s Secret Service and Connery played Bond again in Diamonds Are Forever 1971. Moore was approached, took over the role of Bond from Sean Connery in 1972, and made his first appearance as 007 in Live and Let Die becoming the third actor to portray Bond, after Sean Connery and George Lazenby. Moore portrayed Bond as a debonair playboy with of sense of humour and a skilled detective with a cunning mind. Following Live and Let Die, Moore continued to portray Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974); The Spy Who Loved Me (1977); Moonraker (1979); For Your Eyes Only (1981); Octopussy (1983); and A View to a Kill (1985). In 2004, Moore was voted ‘Best Bond’ in an Academy Awards poll, and he won with 62% of votes in another poll in 2008. In 1987 he hosted Happy Anniversary 007: 25 Years of James Bond.

Moore also starred in Gold alongside Susannah York, and also portrayed an adventurer in Africa opposite Lee Marvin in Shout at the Devil (1976), a commando alongside Richard Burton, Stewart Granger and Richard Harris in the The Wild Geese (1978), a counter-terrorism expert opposite Anthony Perkins in the thriller North Sea Hijack (1979), an obsessed millionaire who looks like Roger Moore in Cannonball Run (1981) and posed as a famous movie star, in Curse of the Pink Panther (credited as “Turk Thrust II). In1990 he appeared in the films My Riviera and Bed & Breakfast. He also appeared in the The Quest and portrayed the Chief in Spice World. Between 1998 and 2002 he starred in all four ITV Pantos: Jack and the Beanstalk; Cinderella; Aladdin and Dick Whittington as Baron Wasteland; the Master of Ceremonies; Widow Twankey and The Mayor And played an amorous homosexual man in Boat Trip. The British comedy show Spitting Image also parodied Roger Moore in the spoof, The Man with the Wooden Delivery, featuring James Bond, Margaret Thatcher and Mikhail Gorbachev. Moore appeared in an advertisement for the Post Office in 2009 and portrayed a secret agent in the Victoria Wood Christmas Special whose mission was to eliminate another agent who looked like Pierce Brosnan. In 2010 Moore provided the voice for Lazenby in Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore. In 2011 Moore co-starred in the film A Princess for Christmas with Katie McGrath and Sam Heughan and also guest-hosted Have I Got News For You.

In 1991 he was Appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and was the voice of Father Christmas or ‘Santa’ in the 2004 UNICEF cartoon The Fly Who Loved Me. He was created a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE), and advanced to Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE) on 14 June 2003. The citation on the knighthood was for Moore’s charity work. In 2008, the French government appointed Moore a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and he also receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 7007 Hollywood Boulevard becoming the 2,350th star installed. In 2012, Moore was awarded an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Hertfordshire, for his outstanding contributions to the UK film and television industry for over 50 years. Moore was also named one of GQ’s fifty best dressed British men and he read Hans Christian Andersen’s “Little Claus and Big Claus” for the children’s fairytales app GivingTales in aid of UNICEF, together with a number of other British celebrities, including Michael Caine, Ewan McGregor, Joan Collins, Stephen Fry, Joanna Lumley, David Walliams, Charlotte Rampling and Paul McKenna. Moore was also involved in the production of a video for PETA that protests against the production and wholesale of foie gras. Sadly Moore was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 2013, which left him unable to drink martinis. He had to learn to walk again after a bout of pneumonia, and had a pacemaker fitted after collapsing on stage. Moore tragically died 23 May 2017 following a short battle with cancer.

Battle of Hastings

The Battle of Hastings took place on14 October 1066, In England on Senlac Hill, seven miles from Hastings, during which the Norman forces of William the Conqueror and Duke William II of Normandy defeated the English army and killed Anglo-Saxon King Harold II of England. The Battle took place approximately 7 miles (11 kilometres) north-west of Hastings, close to the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex, and was a decisive Norman victory.

The background to the battle was the death of the childless King Edward the Confessor in January 1066, which set up a succession struggle between several claimants to his throne. Harold was crowned king shortly after Edward’s death, but faced invasions by William, his own brother Tostig and the Norwegian King Harald Hardrada (Harold III of Norway). Hardrada and Tostig defeated a hastily gathered army of Englishmen at the Battle of Fulford on 20 September 1066, and were in turn defeated by Harold at the Battle of Stamford Bridge five days later. The deaths of Tostig and Hardrada at Stamford left William as Harold’s only serious opponent. While Harold and his forces were recovering from Stamford, William landed his invasion forces in the south of England at Pevensey on 28 September 1066 and established a beachhead for his conquest of the kingdom. Harold was forced to march south swiftly, gathering forces as he went.

Williams invasion force numbered approximately 10,000 against about Harold’s 7000 Soldiers. Harold appears to have tried to surprise William, but scouts found his army and reported its arrival to William, who marched from Hastings to the battlefield to confront Harold. The battle lasted from about 9 am to dusk. Early efforts of the invaders to break the English battle lines had little effect, therefore the Normans adopted the tactic of pretending to flee in panic and then turning on their pursuers. Harold’s death, probably near the end of the battle, led to the retreat and defeat of most of his army. After further marching and some skirmishes, William was crowned as king on Christmas Day 1066. Although there continued to be rebellions and resistance to William’s rule, Hastings effectively marked the culmination of William’s conquest of England. Some historians estimate that 2000 invaders died along with about twice that number of Englishmen. William founded a monastery at the site of the battle, the high altar of the abbey church supposedly placed at the spot where Harold died.

It all started around 911 after the French Carolingian ruler Charles the Simple allowed a group of Vikings under their leader Rollo to settle in Normandy. Their settlement proved successful, and they quickly adapted to the indigenous culture, renouncing paganism, converting toChristianity, and intermarrying with the local population. Over time, the frontiers of the duchy expanded to the west. In 1002 KingÆthelred II of England married Emma, the sister of Richard II, Duke of Normandy.Their son Edward the Confessor, who spent many years in exile in Normandy, succeeded to the English throne in 1042. This led to the establishment of a powerful Norman interest in English politics, as Edward drew heavily on his former hosts for support, bringing in Norman courtiers, soldiers, and clerics and appointing them to positions of power, particularly in the Church. Childless and embroiled in conflict with the formidable Godwin, Earl of Wessex and his sons, Edward may also have encouraged Duke William of Normandy’s ambitions for the English throne.

Following King Edward’s death on 5 January 1066, the lack of a clear heir led to a disputed succession in which several contenders laid claim to the throne of England. Edward’s immediate successor was the Earl of Wessex, Harold Godwinson, the richest and most powerful of the English aristocrats and son of Godwin, Edward’s earlier opponent. Harold was elected king by the Witenagemot of England and crowned by the Archbishop of York, Ealdred, although Norman propaganda claimed the ceremony was performed byStigand, the uncanonically elected Archbishop of Canterbury. Harold was at once challenged by two powerful neighbouring rulers. Duke William claimed that he had been promised the throne by King Edward and that Harold had sworn agreement to this.Harald III of Norway, commonly known as Harald Hardrada, also contested the succession. His claim to the throne was based on an agreement between his predecessor Magnus I of Norway, and the earlier King of England Harthacanute, whereby if either died without heir the other would inherit both England and Norway. William and Harald immediately set about assembling troops and ships for separate invasions.

Early In 1066, Harold’s exiled brother Tostig Godwinson raided south-eastern England with a fleet he had recruited in Flanders, later joined by other ships from Orkney. Threatened by Harold’s fleet, Tostig moved north and raided in East Anglia and Lincolnshire. He was driven back to his ships by the brothers Edwin, Earl of Mercia, and Morcar, Earl of Northumbria. Deserted by most of his followers, he withdrew to Scotland, where he spent the middle of the year recruiting fresh forces. Meanwhile King Harald III of Norway invaded northern England in early September, leading a fleet of more than 300 ships carrying perhaps 15,000 men. Harald’s army was further augmented by the forces of Tostig, who supported the Norwegian king’s bid for the throne. Advancing on York, the Norwegians occupied the city after defeating a northern English army under Edwin and Morcar on 20 September at the Battle of Fulford.

Winnie the Pooh

The children’s book Winnie-the-Pooh, by A. A. Milne, was first published 14 October 1926.Winnie-the-Pooh, also called Pooh Bear, is a fictional anthropomorphic bear created by A. A. Milne. The first collection of stories about the character was the book Winnie-the-Pooh (1926), and this was followed by The House at Pooh Corner (1928). Milne also included a poem about the bear in the children’s verse book When We Were Very Young (1924) and many more in Now We Are Six (1927). All four volumes were illustrated by E. H. Shepard. The Pooh stories have been translated into many languages, includingAlexander Lenard’s Latin translation, Winnie ille Pu, which was first published in 1958, and, in 1960, became the only Latin book ever to have been featured on The New York Times Best Seller list. In popular film adaptations, Pooh Bear has been voiced by actors Sterling Holloway, Hal Smith and Jim Cummings in English, Yevgeny Leonov in Russian, and Shun Yashiro and Sukekiyo Kameyama in Japanese.

Milne named the character Winnie-the-Pooh after a teddy bear owned by his son,Christopher Robin Milne, who was the basis for the character Christopher Robin. Christopher’s toys also lent their names to most of the other characters, except for Owl,Rabbit, and Gopher. Gopher was added to the Disney version. Christopher Robin’s toy bear is now on display at the Main Branch of the New York Public Library in New York City. Christopher Milne had named his toy bear after Winnie, a Canadian black bear which he often saw at London Zoo, and “Pooh”, a swan they had met while on holiday. The bear cub was purchased from a hunter for $20 by Canadian Lieutenant Harry Colebourn in White River, Ontario, Canada, while en route to England during the First World War. He named the bear “Winnie” after his adopted hometown in Winnipeg, Manitoba. “Winnie” was surreptitiously brought to England with her owner, and gained unofficial recognition as The Fort Garry Horse regimental mascot. Colebourn left Winnie at the London Zoo while he and his unit were in France; after the war she was officially donated to the zoo, as she had become a much loved attraction there. Pooh the swan appears as a character in its own right in When We Were Very Young.

The Winnie-the-Pooh stories are set in Ashdown Forest, Sussex, England. The forest is a large area of tranquil open heathland on the highest sandy ridges of the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty situated 30 miles (50 km) south of London. In 1925 Milne, a Londoner, bought a country home a mile to the north of the forest at Cotchford Farm, near Hartfield. According to Christopher Milne, while his father continued to live in London. Most of his father’s visits to the forest at this time were, he noted, family expeditions on foot . Christopher added that, inspired by Ashdown Forest, his father had made it “the setting for two of his books, finishing the second little over three years after his arrival”.

Many locations are inspired by real places in and around the forest, such as the fictional “Hundred Acre Wood” which is in reality Five Hundred Acre Wood; Galleon’s Leap was inspired by the prominent hilltop of Gill’s Lap, while a clump of trees just north of Gill’s Lap became Christopher Robin’s The Enchanted Place because no-one had ever been able to count whether there were sixty-three or sixty-four trees in the circle. The landscapes depicted in E.H. Shepard’s illustrations for the Winnie-the-Pooh books were directly inspired by the distinctive landscape of Ashdown Forest, with its high, open heathlands of heather, gorse, bracken and silver birch punctuated by hilltop clumps of pine trees. Many of Shepard’s illustrations can be matched to actual views, allowing for a degree of artistic licence. Shepard’s sketches of pine trees and other forest scenes are held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.The game of Poohsticks was originally played by Christopher Milne on a footbridge across a tributary of the River Medway in Posingford Wood, close to Cotchford Farm. The wooden bridge is a tourist attraction, and it has become traditional to play the game there using sticks gathered in nearby woodland. When the footbridge recently had to be replaced, the engineer designed a new structure based closely on the drawings of the bridge by E. H. Shepard in the original books, as the bridge did not originally appear as the artist drew it.

Christopher Robin’s teddy bear, Edward, made his character début in a poem called “Teddy Bear” in Milne’s book of children’s verse When We Were Very Young (6 November 1924) although his true first appearance was in the 13 February 1924 edition of Punch magazine, which contained the same poem along with other stories by Milne and Shepard. Winnie-the-Pooh first appeared by name on 24 December 1925, in a Christmas story commissioned and published by the London newspaper The Evening News. It was illustrated by J. H. Dowd. The first collection of Pooh stories appeared in the book Winnie-the-Pooh. The Evening News Christmas story reappeared as the first chapter of the book. At the beginning, it explained that Pooh was in fact Christopher Robin’s Edward Bear, who had been renamed by the boy. He was renamed after a black bear at London Zoo called Winnie who got her name from the fact that she had come from Winnipeg, Canada. The book was published in October 1926 by the publisher of Milne’s earlier children’s work, Methuen, in England, and E. P. Dutton in the United States.