War Cry by Wilbur Smith

Having read many of Wilbur Smith’s exciting fast-paced adventure novels such as Pharaoh and Golden Lion, I would like to read War Cry by Wilbur Smith. It is set in the 1930’s During Adolf Hitler’s rise to power and it concerns two families, one German one South African/British whose paths run in parellel until tumultuous world events beyond their control bring them together.

Saffron Courtney grows up on a sprawling Kenyan estate, under the watchful eye of her father, prominent businessman and distinguished war veteran Leon Courtney. Her childhood is idyllic, until a family tragedy forces her to grow up much faster than necessary. As she grows into a spirited teenager, her thirst for knowledge and adventure leads her to England, where she finds herself inevitably drawn into the heart of the gathering storm in the lead up to World War II.

Meanwhile Gerhard von Meerbach is the privileged and idealistic younger brother of Konrad von Meerbach, heir to an industrial fortune, and vocal supporter of the Nazi Party. Gerhard struggles to stay true to his principles in an increasingly cruel world. His friendship with a Jewish man places him in danger, and forces him to take a stand against the forces of evil that have overtaken his country and his family. But, unknown to him, he is caught in a trap that could cost him everything he holds dear As the Second World War looms over them all, Saffron and Gerhard’s worlds will collide – but there may be more to unite them than tear them apart.

Christopher Paolini

American author Christopher James Paolini was born November 17, 1983, in Los Angeles, California. He was raised in the area of Paradise Valley, Montana. His family members include his parents, Kenneth Paolini and Talita Paolini, and his younger sister, Angela Paolini. Homeschooled for the duration of his education, Paolini graduated from high school at the age of 15 through a set of accredited correspondence courses from the American School of Correspondence in Lansing, Illinois. He currently lives in Paradise Valley, Montana, where he wrote his first book.

Following his high school graduation, he started his work on what would become the novel Eragon, the first of the Inheritance four book series set in the mythical land of Alagaesia. Followed by, Eldest, Brisingr and Inheritance. In 2002, Eragon was published for the first time by Paolini International LLC, Paolini’s parents’ publishing company. To promote the book, Paolini toured over 135 schools and libraries, discussing reading and writing, all the while dressed in “a medieval costume of red shirt, billowy black pants, lace-up boots, and a jaunty black cap.” He drew the cover art for the first edition of Eragon, which featured Saphira’s eye, along with the maps on the inside covers of his books. In 2002, the stepson of author Carl Hiaasen found Eragon in a bookstore and loved it; this led to Hiaasen bringing it to the attention of his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf Who subsequently made an offer to publish Eragon and the rest of the Inheritance cycle. The second edition of Eragon was published by Knopf in August 2003. At the age of nineteen, Paolini became a New York Times bestselling author.

The Inheritance Cycle is Set in the fictional world of Alagaësia the novels focus on the adventures of a teenage boy named Eragon who finds himself thrust into an adventure after discovering what he thinks is a blue rock but which turns out to be a dragon egg. He discovers that an ancient order of Dragon Riders was originally created by elves and dragons millennia earlier, in order to bring peace to the world. However the dragon of One Dragon Rider named Galbatorix was killed by a group of Urgals, this pushed him to insanity, and denied another Dragon by the Council of Elder Riders, Galbatorix blamed the Council for the death of his dragon and sought to destroy the order. He made an alliance with an ambitious young rider, Morzan, and with his help slew another rider and took his next dragon captive, Shruikan. Using magic, he broke Shruikan’s will and forced the dragon to serve him. Gathering more Riders to his cause, he created the Thirteen Forsworn and with their help took over Ilirea, the capital of the Broddring Kingdom, and destroyed Vroengard, the center of the Dragon Riders. Galbatorix slew the Elders, their leader Vrael and took his sword, and most of the Dragon Riders. Elder Rider Oromis and his Dragon Glaedr fled to Ellesmera, the capital of the elves’ kingdom, while Morzan confronted his old friend Brom, slaying his Dragon luckily Brom,escaped. After the fall of the Riders, Galbatorix declared himself King over all of Alagaesia and is trying to destroy all the dragon egg aided by his followers The Forsworn.

Meanwhile Brom created the Varden to oppose the Empire. He is aided by An Elf named Arya who is unfortunately captured by an evil servant of Galbatorix named Durza while delivering a dragon’s egg to Brom. Eragon learns of his own parentage and Brom teaches him Magic and Sword fighting. Then Eragon touches the blue rock which hatches a dragon which he names Saphira and he becomes a dragon rider. Eragon’s cousin, Roran, leaves for a job to earn money so he can start a family with his beloved, Katrina. His uncle, Garrow, is killed by King Galbatorix’s servants, the Ra’zac, and Eragon flees Carvahall with Brom to hunt down the Ra’zac, unaware that Brom is his father. Brom gives Morzan’s sword, Zar’roc, to Eragon. Eragon attempts to rescue Arya and they flee to the Vardan Stronghold of Tronjheim to join Varden’s leader, Ajihad, his daughter Nasuada, the dwarf King Hrothgar, and his foster son Orik, Eragon and Saphira are also tutored by Oromis and Glaedr in Ellesmera and During an elvish Blood-Oath Celebration, Eragon is changed by a symbolic dragon, giving him elf-like abilities to aid his quest to help defeat Galbatorix, Durza and his agents of evil.

Meanwhile Nasuada moves the Varden to Surda which is ruled by King Orrin, and Roran moves the villagers of Carvahall to Surda, after their village is attacked by the Ra’zac, who also capture Katrina. Roran is promoted to Captain while Nasuada allows the Urgals to join the ranks of the Varden. Eragon and Saphira confront Murtagh and Thorn, Murtagh takes Eragon’s sword Zar’roc. Eragon, Saphira, and Roran rescue Katrina. Eragon and Roran destroy much of Helgrind, slaying the Raz’ac while Saphira kills the Lethrblaka, the Raz’ac’s adult form. They then travel to the Beor mountains. Eragon goes back to Du Weldenvarden (the homeland of the elves)and creates his own sword Brisingr, which bursts into flames each time Eragon speaks its name, and learns from Oromis and Glaedr that Brom is his real father and also discovers the source of Galbatorix’s power. Elsewhere The Varden liberate several cities from the Empire, sadly Oromis and Glaedr are killed by Murtagh and Thorn. Eragon then travels to the Vault of Souls on the ruined Vroengard, Where he discovers a massive amount of secret Eldunarí and Dragon eggs hidden from Galbatorix. Unfortunately though Galbatorix also finds them…

Richard Fortus (Guns’n’Roses)

Richard Fortus, the current guitarist with rock band Guns N’ Roses was Born Novembr 17th 1966. Originally formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1985. The classic lineup, of Guns’n”Roses consisted of vocalist Axl Rose, lead guitarist Slash, rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin, bassist Duff McKagan, and drummer Steven Adler. Today, Axl Rose is the only remaining original member, in a lineup that comprises Use Your Illusion–era keyboardist Dizzy Reed, lead guitarists DJ Ashba and Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, lead and rhythm guitarist Richard Fortus, bassist Tommy Stinson, drummer Frank Ferrer and keyboard player Chris Pitman. The band has released six studio albums. Guns N’ Roses’ debut album Appetite for Destruction reached No. 1 on the Billboard 200, hit “Sweet Child o’ Mine“, became their only single to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and The album became the best-selling debut album of all time in the U.S. Thanks to songs like Paradise City and Welcome to the Jungle.

The success of their debut album was followed by the eight-song album G N’ R Lies. The twin albums Use Your Illusion I and Use Your Illusion II, which debuted at No. 2 and No. 1 on the Billboard 200. The cover album “The Spaghetti Incident?” was the band’s last studio album to feature Slash and McKagan. After more than a decade of work and many lineup changes, Guns N’ Roses released the long-awaited album Chinese Democracy in 2008 which, at an estimated fourteen million dollars in production costs, made it the most expensive album to ever be produced in music history. It debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200 but underwhelmed industry expectations, despite mostly positive critical reception.

Guns N’ Roses have been credited with reviving the mainstream popularity of rock ‘n’ roll, at a time when popular music was dominated by dance music and pop metal. Their late 1980s and early 1990s years have been described as the period in which they brought forth a “hedonistic rebelliousness” reminiscent of the early Rolling Stones, a reputation that had earned them the nickname “The Most Dangerous Band in the World” The band’s classic lineup, along with later members Reed and drummer Matt Sorum, were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, their first year of eligibility.

Martin Scorsese

Widely regarded as one of the greatest directors of all time, the American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian Martin Scorsese was born November 17, 1942. Scorsese’s body of work addresses such themes as Italian American identity, Roman Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, machismo, modern crime, and violence. Scorsese is hailed as one of the most significant and influential filmmakers of all time, directing landmark films such as Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), and Goodfellas (1990) – all of which he collaborated on with actor and close friend Robert De Niro. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed (2006), having been nominated a previous six times.In 1990 he founded The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation, and in 2007 he founded the World Cinema Foundation. In 1998, the American Film Institute placed three Scorsese films on their list of the greatest movies in America: Raging Bull at #24, Taxi Driver at #47 and Goodfellas at #94. For their tenth anniversary edition of the list, Raging Bull was moved to #4, Taxi Driver was moved to #52 and Goodfellas was moved to #92.

During his long and distinguished ongoing career scorsese has beenen awarded many honours and awards . in 2001 Scorsese received the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic and in the same year AFI put two Scorsese films on their list of the most “heart-pounding movies” in American cinema: Taxi Driver at #22 and Raging Bull at #51. At a ceremony in Paris, France, Martin Scorsese was awarded the French Legion D’ Honeur in recognition of his contribution to cinema. is a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won an Academy Award, a Palme d’Or, Grammy Award, Emmys, Golden Globes, BAFTAs, and DGA Awards.During his career he has won many awards and honours including the AFI Life Achievement Award in 1997 and 2006, at the 48th Grammy Awards, Scorsese was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Long Form Music Video for No Direction Home.In 2007, Scorsese won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed, which also won Best Picture. On September 11, 2007, the Kennedy Center Honors committee, which recognizes career excellence and cultural influence, honoured Scorsese. On June 17, 2008, AFI put two of Scorsese’s films on the AFI’s 10 Top 10 list: Raging Bull at #1 for the Sports genre and Goodfellas at #2 for the Gangster genre.

Scorsese was the recipient of the 2010 Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 67th Golden Globe Awards.On September 18, 2011, at the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, Scorsese won in the category Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series, for his work on the series premiere of Boardwalk Empire.On January 15, 2012, at the 69th Golden Globe Awards, Scorsese won an award for Best Director on the 2011 movie Hugo. On February 12, 2012 at the 65th British Academy Film Awards, Scorsese was the recipient of the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award.
In 2012 Scorsese won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for Nonfiction Programming for his work on the documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World. He has also earned praise from many film legends including Ingmar Bergman, Frank Capra, Jean-Luc Godard, Werner Herzog, Elia Kazan Akira Kurosawa,David Lean, Michael Powell, Satyajit Ray, and François Truffault.

Peter Cook

l am a big fan of the late great English actor, satirist, writer and comedian Peter Cook who was born 17 November 1937. he is regarded as An extremely influential figure in modern British comedy & a leading light of the British satire boom of the 1960s & has been described by Stephen Fry as “the funniest man who ever drew breath”. Cook was closely associated with anti-establishment comedy which emerged in Britain and the United States in the late 1950s. Educated at Radley College and Pembroke College, Cambridge, Cook joined the Cambridge University Liberal Club & It was at Pembroke thatCook performed and wrote comedy sketches as a member of the Cambridge Footlights Club, of which he became president in 19which was60′s, & wrote for Kenneth Williams, before joining a four-man group satirical stage show, Beyond the Fringe, with Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett and Dudley Moore, which included Cook impersonating the Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan.In 1961 Cook opened the Establishment club in central London. Cook said it was a satirical venue modelled on “those wonderful Berlin cabarets… which did so much to stop the rise of Hitler and prevent the outbreak of the Second World War”. Cook befriended and supported Australian comedian and actor Barry Humphries, who began his British solo career at the club. Cook’s chiselled looks and languid manner led Humphries to observe that whereas most people take after their father or mother, Cook seemed more like an aunt. Dudley Moore’s jazz trio also played in the basement of the club during the early 1960s.

In 1962, the BBC commissioned a pilot for a television series of satirical sketches based on the Establishment club, cacook That Was The Week That Was ‘.Around this time, Cook provided financial backing for the satirical magazine Private Eye. For a time, the magazine was produced from the premises of the Establishment club. Cook ‘s first regular television spot was on Granada Television’s Braden Beat with Bernard Braden, where he featured his most enduring character: the static, dour and monotonal E.L. Wisty.Cook’s comedy partnership with Dudley Moore led to Not Only… But Also. Using few props, they created dry and absurd television. Cook played characters such as Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling and the two men created their Pete and Dud alter egos. Other sketches included “Superthunderstingcar”, a parody of the Gerry Anderson marionette TV shows, and Cook’s pastiche of 1960s trendy artsdocumentaries – satirised in a TV segment on Greta Garbo. A compilation of six half-hour programmes, The Best of What’s Left of Not Only…But Also. Cook and Moore began to act in films together such as With The Wrong Box (1966) and Bedazzled (1967) , the underlying story of Bedazzled is a comic parody of Faust, which stars Cook as George Spigott (The Devil) who tempts Stanley Moon (Moore), a frustrated, short-order chef, with the promise of gaining his heart’s desire – the unattainable beauty and waitress at his cafe, Margaret Spencer (Eleanor Bron) – in exchange for his soul, but repeatedly tricks him. The film features cameo appearances by Barry Humphries as Envy and Raquel Welch as Lust. Moore composed the soundtrack music and co-wrote (with Cook) the songs performed in the film. In 1968, Cook and Moore did four one-hour programmes entitled Goodbye Again with John Cleese ,which were based on the Pete and Dud characters.

ln 1970, Cook took over a a satirical film called The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer . As a reult Cook became a favourite of the chat show circuit sadly his own effort at hosting one for the BBC in 1971, Where Do I Sit? didn’t work and He was replaced by Michael Parkinson, which started Parkinson’s career as a chat show host. Cook and Moore used sketches from Not Only….But Also and Goodbye Again with new material for a stage revue called Behind the Fridge. Which proved very popular and won Tony and Grammy Awards. When it finished, Moore stayed in the U.S. to pursue a film career in Hollywood. Cook returned to Britain and recorded the more risqué humour of Pete and Dud like “Derek and Clive”. One of these audio recordings was also filmed Two further Derek and Clive albums were released, the last accompanied by a film.In 1978 Cook appeared on British music series Revolver where emerging punk and new wave acts played . Cook also played multiple roles on the 1977 concept album Consequences, which was A mixture of spoken comedy and progressive rock with an environmental subtext. Cook appeared at the first three fund-raising galas staged by humourists John Cleese and Martin Lewis on behalf of Amnesty International. The benefits were dubbed The Secret Policeman’s Balls, where he performed on all three nights of the first show in April 1976, A Poke in the Eye (with a Sharp Stick), as an individual performer and as a member of the cast of Beyond The Fringe, which reunited for the first time since the 1960s. He also appeared in a Monty Python sketch, taking the place of Eric Idle. Cook was on the cast album of the show and in the film, Pleasure At Her Majesty’s. He was in the second Amnesty gala in May 1977, An Evening Without Sir Bernard Miles. It was retitled The Mermaid Frolics. Cook performed monologues and skits with Terry Jones.

In June 1979, Cook performed all four nights of The Secret Policeman’s Ball – teaming with John Cleese. Cook also performed a couple of solo pieces and a sketch with Eleanor Bron, PLUS the “End Of The World” sketch from Beyond The Fringe., he also wrote and voiced radio commercials to advertise the film in the UK. He also hosted a spoof film awards ceremony that was part of the world première of the film in London in March 1982. Following Cook’s 1987 stage reunion with Moore for the annual U.S. benefit for the homeless, Comic Relief (not related to the UK Comic Relief benefits), Cook repeated the reunion for a British audience by performing with Moore at the 1989 Amnesty benefit The Secret Policeman’s Biggest Ball. In 1980, Cook moved to Hollywood and appeared as an uptight English butler to a wealthy American woman in a short-lived U.S. television sitcom The Two of Us, In 1980, Cook starred in l Peter Cook & Co. which included memorable, comedy sketches, such as a Tales of the Unexpected parody “Tales Of The Much As We Expected”. The cast included John Cleese, Rowan Atkinson, Beryl Reid, Paula Wilcox and Terry Jones. ln 1983 Cook played the role of Richard III in the first episode of Blackadder, “The Foretelling”, which parodies Laurence Olivier’s portrayal. He narrated the short film “Diplomatix” by Norwegian comedy trio Kirkvaag, Lystad and Mjøen, which won the “Special Prize of the City of Montreux” at the Montreux Comedy Festival in 1985. In 1986 he partnered Joan Rivers on her UK talk show. He appeared as Mr Jolly in 1987 in The Comic Strip Presents’ Mr Jolly Lives Next Door.In 1988, Cook appeared as a contestant on the improvisation comedy show, Whose Line Is It Anyway? Cook was declared the winner, his prize being to read the credits in the style of a New York cab driver. Cook returned to the BBC as Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling for an appearance with Ludovic Kennedy in A Life in Pieces. The 12 interviews saw Sir Arthur recount his life based on the Twelve Days of Christmas. Unscripted interviews with Cook as Streeb-Greebling and satirist Chris Morris were recorded in late 1993 and broadcast as Why Bother? on BBC Radio 3. On 17 December 1993, Cook appeared on Clive Anderson Talks Back as four characters – biscuit tester and alien abductee Norman House, football manager and motivational speaker Alan Latchley, judge Sir James Beauchamp and rock legend Eric Daley. he also read links for Arena’s “Radio Night”. He also appeared, in the 1993 Christmas special of One Foot in the Grave (“One Foot in the Algarve”), playing a muckraking tabloid journalist.

Cook made his last TV appearance in November 1994. Cook died on 9 January 1995, aged 57, having suffered a gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the intensive-care unit of the Royal Free Hospital in Hampstead, North London. Days earlier he had been taken in and announced, “I feel a bit poorly”. Dudley Moore attended Cook’s memorial service in London in May 1995 and he and Martin Lewis presented a two-night memorial for Cook in Los Angeles the following November, to mark what would have been Cook’s 58th birthday.Cook is acknowledged as the one of the main influence on British comedians from amateur dramatic clubs of British universities to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and then to the radio and television.ln 1999 the minor planet 20468 Petercook, in the main asteroid belt, was named after him.Ten years after his death, Cook was ranked at number one in the Comedians’ Comedian, a poll of 300 comics, comedy writers, producers and directors. Channel 4 broadcast Not Only But Always, a TV film dramatising the relationship between Cook and Moore, with Rhys Ifans portraying Cook. At the 2005 Edinburgh Festival Fringe a play, , examined the relationship from Moore’s view, Pete and Dud: Come Again. Tom Goodman-Hill played Cook.At the 2007 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Goodbye – the (after)life of Cook & Moore was presented at the Gilded Balloon. The play imagined the newly dead Moore meeting Cook in Limbo, also inhabited by other comic actors with whom they had worked, including Peter Sellers, Tony Hancock, Frankie Howerd and Kenneth Williams. In May 2009 the play was seen again in London’s West End at the Leicester Square Theatre ) with Jonathan Hansler as Cook, Adam Bampton Smith as Moore and Clive Greenwood as everyone else.A green plaque was unveiled by the Heritage Foundation at the site of the Establishment club on 15 February 2009.

Planet Stories

Planet Stories was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published by Fiction House between 1939 and 1955. It featured interplanetary adventures, both in space and on other planets, and was initially focused on a young readership. Malcolm Reiss was editor or editor-in-chief for all of its 71 issues. Planet Stories was launched at the same time as Planet Comics. Planet Stories also included stories from many well-known authors including Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Philip K.Dick and Clifford Simak.

Planet Stories two main writers are Leigh Brackett and Ray Bradbury, both of whom set many of their stories on a romanticized version of Mars that owed much to the depiction of Barsoom in the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Bradbury’s work for Planet included an early story in his Martian Chronicles sequence. Brackett’s best-known work for the magazine was a series of adventures featuring Eric John Stark, which began in the summer of 1949. Brackett and Bradbury collaborated on one story, “Lorelei of the Red Mist”, which appeared in 1946; it was generally well-received, although one letter to the magazine complained that the story’s treatment of sex, though mild by modern standards, was too explicit. The artwork also emphasized attractive women, with scantily clad damsels in distress or alien princesses on almost every cover.

Although science fiction (sf) had been published before the 1920s, it did not begin to coalesce into a separately marketed genre until the appearance in 1926 of Amazing Stories, a pulp magazine published by Hugo Gernsback. By the end of the 1930s the field was undergoing its first boom Fiction House, a major pulp publisher, had run into difficulties during the Depression, but after a relaunch in 1934 found success with detective and romance pulp titles. Fiction House’s first title with sf interest was Jungle Stories, which was launched in early 1939; it was not primarily a science fiction magazine, but often featured storylines with marginally science fictional themes, such as survivors from Atlantis. At the end of 1939 Fiction House decided to add an sf magazine to its lineup; it was titled Planet Stories, and was published by Love Romances, a subsidiary company that had been created to publish Fiction House’s romance titles. The first issue was dated Winter 1939. Two comics were launched at the same time: Jungle Comics and Planet Comics; both were published monthly, whereas Planet Stories was quarterly.

Malcolm Reiss edited Planet Stories from the beginning, and retained editorial oversight and control throughout its run, though he was not always the named editor on the masthead; when other editors were involved, his title was “managing editor” The first of these sub-editors was Wilbur S. Peacock, who worked from 1942 until 1945, after which he was replaced by Chester Whitehorn for three issues, and then by Paul L. Payne, from 1946 to Spring 1950. Published science-fiction writer Jerome Bixby, edited the next issue together with Jungle Stories and did much to improve the magazine, persuading the established writers to find unusual variations on the interplanetary adventure theme such as Poul Anderson’s “Duel on Syrtis” which is about an Earthman tracking an alien on Mars, and Theodore Sturgeon’s “The Incubi on Planet X”, which is about aliens who kidnap Earth women. Bixby was replaced by Malcolm Reiss in 1951. Following Bixby’s departure Planet’s major contributor was Philip K. Dick, who wrote five stories including “Beyond Lies the Wub” and “James P. Crow”, in which a human suffers discrimination in a world of robots. Jack O’Sullivan took over in 1952.

The letter column in Planet was titled “The Vizigraph”; it was also very active, with long letters from an engaged readership. It often printed letters from established writers, and from fans who would go on to become well known professionally. Most editions of Planet Stories initially focused on interplanetary adventures,often taking place in primitive societies that would now be regarded as “sword and sorcery” settings, and were a mixture space opera, planetary romances and tales of action and adventure on alien planets and in interplanetary space. Brackett and Bradbury set many of their stories on a romanticized version of Mars that owed much to the Barsoom of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Leigh Brackett wrote a series of stories featuring adventurer Eric John Stark, which began with “Queen of the Martian Catacombs”. Ray Bradbury also wrote “The Million Year Picnic” which was included into The Martian Chronicles and also co-wrote “Lorelei of the Red Mist” with Leigh Brackett. Ray Bradbury often demonstrated his reservations about the advance of technology, particularly in “The Golden Apples of the Sun”. Several other well-known writers appeared in Planet Stories, including Clifford Simak, James Blish, Fredric Brown, Damon Knight and Isaac Asimov whose story, originally titled “Pilgrimage”, appeared in 1942 as “Black Friar of the Flame”.

Almost every story that appeared in Planet could be described as space opera, basic themes included Earth being threatened by aliens or Earthmen being drawn into conflicts on alien worlds, such as Carl Selwyn’s “Venus Has Green Eyes”, which features a Venusian princess who hates humans. Many of Leigh Brackett’s female heroines were also head strong, hot tempered but brave and intelligent and would fight alongside the hero. Stories like “Lorelei of the Red Mist”, also depicted sexuality which caused controversy among readers. As did what the characters were wearing with functional spacesuits worn by the men, while the women wore transparent suits through which bikinis could be seen, this was sarcastically referred to as “sexual dimorphism in space” by many, with many of the covers also emphasizing sex. Hannes Bok contributed much of the interior artwork, and the covers were often by Allen Anderson during the early years. Later, Kelly Freas became a frequent cover artist. One of the best artists to work on Planet was Alexander Leydenfrost, whose work, epitomized much of what Planet Stories represented in the 1940s”. Sadly though despite it’s popularity the Summer 1955 issue was the final edition of Planet Stories.

Mani (Primal Scream/Stone Roses)

Gary “Mani” Mounfield, bass player with seminal British Alternative Rock bands The Stone Roses and Primal Scream was Born November 16th 1962. Formed in Manchester in 1983 The Stone Roses were one of the pioneering groups of the Madchester movement . The band’s most successful lineup consists of vocalist Ian Brown, guitarist John Squire, bassist Gary “Mani” Mounfield, and drummer Alan “Reni” Wren. The band released their debut album,The Stone Roses, in 1989. The album was a breakthrough success for the band so the Stone Roses decided to capitalise on their success by signing to a major label, however their current record label Silvertone would not let them out of their contract,which led to an acrimonious and lengthy legal dispute. they eventually signed a deal with Geffen in 1991, and released their second album Second Coming in 1994. Sadly this wasn’t as successful and after several lineup changes throughout the supporting tour, The group disbanded Reni going first, followed by Squire. In 2011 John Squire, Ian Brown, bassist Gary ‘Mani’ announce that they had reunited and would perform a reunion tour of the world in 2012, including three shows at Heaton Park which became the fastest selling rock concerts in UK history, after 150,000 tickets sold out just 14 minutes after going on sale. As a result A further date was added and the remaining 75,000 tickets sold out soon afterwards. The band, have also said that it was their intention was to ‘uplift’ the national mood in hard times and that today’s music was ‘boring’ and ‘corporate’. There are also persistent rumours that they are recording a third album, and a new film which is set during the Stone Roses 1990 Spike Island show.

SCREAMADELICA http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dJEvF7dPMNM

As well as being a member of the Stone Roses Gary “Mani” Mounfield, ( Born November 16th 1962,) was also a member of Scottish alternative rock band Primal Scream. Who were originally formed in 1982 in Glasgow by Bobby Gillespie (vocals) and Jim Beattie and now based in London. The current lineup consists of Gillespie, Andrew Innes (guitar), Martin Duffy (keyboards), and Darrin Mooney (drums). Barrie Cadogan has toured and recorded with the band since 2006 as a replacement after the departure of guitarist Robert “Throb” Young. Primal Scream career not take off until Gillespie left his position as drummer of The Jesus and Mary Chain. The band were a key part of the mid-1980s indie pop scene, but eventually moved away from their more jangly sound, taking on more psychedelic and then garage rock influences, before incorporating a dance music element to their sound. Their 1991 album Screamadelica broke the band into the mainstream with songs like, “Loaded“, which became the band’s first major hit, reaching number 16 on the UK Singles Chartand “Come Together“, which reached number 19. They released two more singles, “Higher Than The Sun” and “Don’t Fight It, Feel It”, both of which were successful. The band began work on their fourth album “Give out but Dont Give up”.In March 1994, the first single from the new album, “Rocks”, was released & became the band’s highest charting single to date,Two more singles were released from the album, “Jailbird” and “(I’m Gonna) Cry Myself Blind”, both of which charted progressively lower.

ScreamadelicaAfter a short hiatus, the band returned with a new lineup. Gary “Mani” Mounfield, fresh from the well-publicised break-up of his previous band, The Stone Roses, was added as the band’s new bassist, and Paul Mulraney was added as their new drummer. The arrival of Mani revitalized the group, who were considering disbanding after the failure of Give Out but released a new album Vanishing Point which had a complex shoegazing dance/dub rhythm, harking back to the crossover success of Screamadelica, yet sounding significantly darker. Some songs on the album were inspired by cult 1971 film Vanishing Point; Gillespie said that they wanted to create an alternative soundtrack for the film.the band’s sixth album XTRMNTR had a harsher and angrier musical direction. Many of the songs they wrote had overtly political lyrics, Gillespie said the band wished to convey “what it’s like to be in Britain in this day and age The album featured mulitiple guest appearances, including the Chemical Brothers, New Order’s Bernard Sumner, and former My Bloody Valentine guitarist Kevin Shields, who had become a semi-permanent member.

The first single from XTRMNTR, was entitled “Swastika Eyes. their seventh album, Evil Heat, was released in 2002. On the album Kate Moss sang professionally for the first time with single “Some Velvet Morning” and The album also featured another guest appearance, Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant. In 2003 the double CD album Dirty Hits was released containing the better known works and some previously unheard versions and remixes of those tunes.The next album Riot City Blues contained “euphoric rock ‘n’ roll songs” which was intended to capture the energy of Primal Scream’s live performances.The album’s first single, “Country Girl”, was released on 22 May 2006. The album, Riot City Blues, was released in June also released their first DVD, Riot City Blues Tour, which featured clips of the band’s performance in London, as well as all their music videos and an interview with Gillespie and Mani. Primal Scream spent most of 2011 touring in support of 20th Anniversary of Screamadelica, on 18 October Mani revealed he had left the band to follow his dream due to the reformation of his original band The Stone Roses. Primal Scream also supported The Stone Roses at their Heaton Park concert in Manchester in 2012. Primal Scream remain commercially successful and continue to tour and record.