Seen and not Seen by William Bowden

I would like to read Seen and not Seen by William Bowden, an exciting fast-paced technological thriller set in the near future. It is available free gratis on Amazon Kindle and is first book in the trilogy by the same name, and is part of the Veil series, a collection of interconnected stories looking at the folly of Man, the Earth’s stretched resources, what it means to be human, the endeavors undertaken to preserve our way of life and the dark road that some elements of the Human Race would have us take and how they are all interconnected.

It Features a clandestine government agency who are investigating a mysterious organisation known as The Veil. The Veil are impartial and play all sides, sometimes in our best interests, sometimes not. Now they have secretly deposited something at the United Nations—the victim of a horrifying crime against humanity. But is she a pawn or a terrifying weapon? They remain unaware that the answer lies at the center of one man’s dramatic spiral into an abyss of mania and despair that is already playing out on the world stage.

World Television Day

The United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 November as World Television Day commemorating the date on which the first World Television Forum was held in 1996 it brought together leading figures from the media industry to analyze the growing impact that TV had on decision-making and public opinion when it comes to issues of worldwide peace and security. In December 1996 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed the 21st of November World Television Day, the same year the first World Television Forum was held. Acording to the United Nations, this decision was taken in order to give recognition of the increasing impact television has had on decision-making by bringing various conflicts and threats to peace and security to the world’s attention, as well as its coverage of other major issues, including economic and social.

World Television Day is not meant to be so much a celebration of the electronic medium itself, but rather of the philosophy which it represents–a philosophy of openness and transparency of world issues. Television has long been thought to represent communication and globalization in the contemporary world. However, not all of the government representatives present saw matters quite that way. The delegation from Germany said, “Television is only one means of information and an information medium to which a considerable majority of the world population has no access… That vast majority could easily look at World Television Day as a rich man’s day. They do not have access to television. There are more important information media and here I would mention radio in particular.”

World Television Day can be marked by watching television. However instead of watching vulgar reality shows offering little to no value of any kind to their audience it may be a good opportunity to rewatch and relive some of the greatest moments of television such as David Attenborough, or some other groundbreaking series such as Cosmos, Important Televised Events like the moon landing, Royal Events or Live Aid which that helped bring the reality of a rapidly technologically advancing world into people’s homes, forever changing their lives and how they perceived the world. 1954 marked the launch of Disney’s “Wonderful World of Color”, a family-friendly variety program that mixed iconic cartoons, drama and documentary programming. The very first televised presidential debate between Republican Vice President Richard Nixon and his challenger, relatively unknown Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy in 1960 changed the presidential elections forever. For the first time ever, American voters actually saw the candidates present their ideas, which worked greatly in favor of the young and handsome Kennedy, who went on to win the election. And few moments, if any, in television history could ever surpass Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Ed “Buzz” Aldrin’s moon landing in 1969, which many people consider to be a pivotal moment in their lives until this very day–after that, nothing was going to be impossible again.

World Television Day was established as a way of bringing focus back to these issues on an annual basis. In years gone by major TV stations have come together on the day to broadcast tributes to the importance of television in people’s lives. The obvious way for anyone to celebrate is to turn on their TV and watch. Those that want to become more involved and have ideas about how to honor the day are welcomed to send their thoughts to the official website. However not everybody was happy about this and Opposition to this declaration took the form of 11 abstentions to a vote on the resolution; in expressing their opposition, the delegation from Germany said:

“ There are already three United Nations days encompassing similar subjects: World Press Freedom Day; World Telecommunication Day; and World Development Information Day. To add another day does not make much sense… [T]elevision is only one means of information and an information medium to which a considerable majority of the world population has no access… That vast majority could easily look at World Television Day as a rich man’s day. They do not have access to television. There are more important information media and here I would mention radio in particular. We think it is more important to enhance the role of those media than that of television.”

Alex James (Blur)

Alex James, the bassist with seminal Bitpop band Blur was Born November 21st 1968. Blur were Formed in London in 1988 as Seymour, consisting of singer/keyboardist Damon Albarn, guitarist/singer Graham Coxon, bassist Alex James and drummer Dave Rowntree. Blur’s debut album Leisure (1991) incorporated the sounds of Madchester and shoegazing. Following a stylistic change influenced by English guitar pop groups such as The Kinks, The Beatles and XTC, Blur released Modern Life Is Rubbish (1993), Parklife (1994) and The Great Escape (1995). As a result, the band helped to popularise the Britpop genre and achieved mass popularity in the UK, aided by a chart battle with rival band Oasis in 1995 dubbed “The Battle of Britpop”.

In recording their follow-up, Blur (1997), the band underwent another reinvention, showing influence from the lo-fi style of American indie rock groups. “Song 2″, one of the album’s singles, brought Blur mainstream success in the United States. Their next album, 13 (1999) saw the band members experimenting with electronic and gospel music, and featured more personal lyrics from Albarn. In May 2002, Coxon left Blur during the recording of their seventh album Think Tank (2003). Containing electronic sounds and more minimal guitar work, the album was marked by Albarn’s growing interest in hip hop and African music. After a 2003 tour without Coxon, Blur did no studio work or touring as a band, as members engaged in other projects.

In 2008 Blur reunited, with Coxon back in the fold, for a series of concerts and have continued to release several singles and retrospective releases. In 2009 Blur reunited, with Graham Coxon back in the fold, for a series of concerts and during the following years they released several singles and retrospective compilations, and toured internationally. In 2012, the group received a Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. Their first major release in twelve years, The Magic Whip (2015), became the sixth consecutive Blur studio album to top the British charts.

World Hello Day

World Hello Day Takes place Every year, on November 21. The objective is to say hello to at least ten people on the day. The message is for world leaders to use communication rather than force to settle conflicts. Participants verbally greet ten people or more on that day as an expression of the importance of personal communication in preserving peace. World Hello Day was founded in 1973 by Brian McCormack, a Ph.D. graduate of Arizona State University, and Michael McCormack, a graduate of Harvard University, in response to the Yom Kippur War. The McCormack brothers mailed 1,360 letters, in seven languages, to government leaders worldwide to encourage participation in the first World Hello Day. Since then World Hello Day has been observed by people in 180 countries.

Any person can participate in World Hello Day simply by greeting ten people or more. This demonstrates the importance of personal communication for preserving peace. World Hello Day was begun in response to the conflict between Egypt and Israel in the fall of 1973. People around the world use the occasion of World Hello Day as an opportunity to express their concern for world peace. Beginning with a simple greeting on World Hello Day, their activities send a message to leaders, encouraging them to use communication rather than force to settle conflicts. In its first year, World Hello Day gained the support of 15 countries.[4] As a global event World Hello Day joins local participation in a global expression of peace.

Thirty-one winners of the Nobel Peace Prize are among the people who have noted World Hello Day’s value as an instrument for preserving peace and as an occasion that makes it possible for anyone in the world to contribute to the process of creating peace. Other supporters include almost 100 authors, entertainers, and world leaders, including novellist Michael McCormack has recalled since a young age of seven that he enjoyed writing and acting. He graduated Harvard University in 1974 and, during the fall of his senior year in 1973, he and his brother, Brian McCormack, started World Hello Day. Throughout his college years, McCormack was editor of the first-year literary magazine and a writer for the Lampoon, a semi-secret organization that publishes a humor magazine. Since the creation of World Hello Day, Michael J. McCormack has written several novels including, Gandhi’s Last Book and “The Quotations of Chairman Meow”, as well as plays like “Farewell Fillmore High”. After graduating from Harvard, McCormack moved to New York City. In 1999, Michael McCormack was accepted to the University of California at Los Angeles film school for directing and subsequently moved to LA from Nebraska to follow his directing aspirations.