Silkworm and Career of Evil

I would like to watch The DVD Adaptation of The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith (J.K.Rowling). It features Cormoran Strike, a private investigator who is an ex-SIB investigator who has lost part of a leg after a bombing in Afghanistan. He has no money and is also the illegitimate son of a famous rock star (as the result of an affair with a notorious groupie). Cormoran Strike is approached by Leonora Quine with a plea to locate her husband, the notorious writer Owen Quine, who has disappeared without a trace. Quine, was once hailed as one of the original literary rebels and was presented as the literary world’s version of music’s punk rock scene however he never repeated the success of his original novel.

Strike discovers that his disappearance coincides with the leak of the manuscript for his latest novel, Bombyx Mori, which The London literary community consider to be unpublishable; due to its unpleasant mix of rape, sadomasochism, torture, necrophilia and cannibalism. With the hero being tricked and eaten alive by various characters who all sound suspiciously like people in Quine’s life

Meanwhile Strike’s relationship with his assistant Robin Ellacott deteriorates, after a disastrous meeting with her fiancé Matthew. Robin is dissatisfied stuck in the role of secretary when she aspires to be an investigator herself. Strike makes a disturbing discovery when he finds Quine’s body in an abandoned house, bound, disembowelled, doused in acid and posed like the centerpiece of a meal, in a grotesque parody of the final scene in Bombyx Mori. Strike’s investigation focuses on the seven people portrayed in the manuscript: his wife, Leonora; his lover, Kathryn Kent; his transgender protégée, Pippa Midgley; his harsh agent, Elizabeth Tassel; his alcoholic editor, Jerry Waldegrave; his publisher, Daniel Chard; and his former friend and fellow literary rebel, Michael Fancourt. Gradually the suspects begin to turn on one another, accusing and counter-accusing each other of not only murdering Quine, but of ghostwriting part of Bombyx Mori. Then Matthew’s mother dies suddenly and Strike’s relations with Robin get strained even further and Strike cautions Robin that if she chooses to become an investigator, she may have to do things that her fiancé Matthew will not like.

Leonora becomes the Main suspect and Strike focuses on Quine’s relationship with Michael Fancourt, which grew icy after Fancourt’s first wife Elspeth wrote a novel which was panned by critics and caused Elspeth to commit suicide, with Fancourt accusing Quine and Tassel of causing her suicide. Then Inconsistencies are discovered between the original draft of Bombyx Mori and the final manuscript. Kathryn Kent and Pippa Midgely, also begin acting suspiciously. Then Strike discovers something else important about Bombyx Mori. Then At a party for another Author, Strike discovers that, Elizabeth Tassel was also an author before she became an agent and learns who actually wrote the parody of Elspeth Fancourt’s novel. Strike then discovers a convoluted trail of blackmail, conspiracy and murder Involving Owen Quine, Elizabeth Tassel, Michael Fancourt and Leonora Quine.

Career of Evil

I would also like to watch The DVD Adaptation of Career of evil. This begins a year after The Silkworm an sees Robin Ellacott, assisting Cormoron Strike as a full-time investigator. However The increasing closeness between the two coworkers creates tension between Robin and her longtime boyfriend/fiancé, Matthew, who disapproves and is very jealous of her relationship with Strike. Strike is meanwhile beginning a new relationship with Elin, a beautiful ex-musician and BBC radio presenter. Meanwhile Robin receives a rather gruesome package from a courier, containing a woman’s severed right leg and accompanied by a note quoting from the Blue Öyster Cult song “Mistress of the Salmon Salt (Quicklime Girl)”.

Strike believes the package was sent by someone with a grudge against him and names four suspects to the police; Terrence “Digger” Malley, an infamous gangster with a history of mailing severed body parts, The second is a paedophile named Noel Brockbank, The third is an ex-squaddie, Donald Laing, whom Strike had investigated for severe physical abuse of his wife and child and The fourth suspect is Strike’s ex-stepfather Jeff Whittaker whom, despite his acquittal, Strike still believes to have murdered his mother. Strike also investigates a young woman who had once requested Strike’s help in amputating her own leg as a result of body dysmorphia.

Meanwhile Robin and Matthew’s relationship becomes further strained after Matthew sleeps with his university friend Sarah Shadlock so Robin calls off her engagement. Heartbroken drunk and miserable Robin reveals the horrific truth behind her dropping out of University to Strike who later travels to Edinburgh, where one of his former SIB colleagues is now stationed. Strike discovers that Noel Brockbank’s pension is being sent to Barrow-in-Furness. Strike then visits Melrose, where Donald Laing’s mother still lives. Hoping to gather information about Laing’s current whereabouts, sadly Laing’s mother is unable to help However her neighbour is good friends with the parents of Rona, Laing’s ex-wife whom he was convicted of abusing, and agrees to arrange a meeting. Rona’s mother expresses continuing gratitude to Strike (as he was the person who rescued her daughter, and offers to assist Strike. Strike discovers that Laing recently attempted to visit his mother in Melrose but was unable due to his history of violent behavior.

Strike learns that, during Laing’s childhood, a field owned by a farmer who dismissed Laing from his employ was mysteriously burned down, that several girls in the area had accused him of rape, and Rona also suspects Laing of killing their family cat. However None of these suspicions were ever confirmed. Strike discovers that Laing visited Rona once since leaving prison, and threatened to kill her in retribution for his son (who had died of neglect while Rona was chained to the bed).

So Strike returns to London. Meanwhile The police discover that the leg sent to Robin matches the recently discovered body of the would-be amputee who had written to Strike. Then Robin is sent another gruesome package This time it contains a toe from the left foot of the same corpse, along with more Blue Öyster Cult lyrics. Strike and Robin journey through England to track their three suspects, with mixed results. They travel to Laing’s last known address in Corby and meet Lorraine, a middle-aged woman whom Laing had been living with. Strike discovers that although Laing was moody and robbed her he now suffers from psoriatic arthritis. From Corby, Robin and Strike travel to Barrow-in-Furness to seek out Holly Brockbank, the person who has been cashing Noel’s military pension checks.

Robin discovers that Holly is Noel’s twin sister who had been left to care for him following his discharge from the army following a brain injury that also left him physically disfigured. Holly reveals that Noel was prone to violent outbursts, and reveals that their stepfather had been molesting them for their entire childhood and that she is completely aware that her brother is a paedophile. Strike learns that Holly finally Evicted Noel after After a particularly violent outburst, and threatened to tell the police of his sexual proclivities. Noel blackmailed Holly to keep silent and Strike’s worst fears concerning Noel are confirmed. On the trip to London Strike reveals more about his step father Jeff Whittaker who displays all the symptoms of being a narcissist sociopath, with an unhealthy obsession of death, who used to quote Satanic lyrics to Strike regularly, especially those glorifying death and decay. Strike also reveals that Whittaker was found to have kept a dead woman’s body with him in a flat for over a month some years after Leda Strike’s death. Strike discovers that Whittaker is currently pimping and possibly selling methamphetamine. Meanwhile The killer strikes twice more during the investigation, cutting two fingers from one victim and the ear lobes from another, leading to the killer becoming known as the Shacklewell Ripper.

Then Wardle’s brother is struck and killed in a hit-and-run motor accident, necessitating his departure from work. He relinquishes the case to Roy Carver, the lead investigator on the Lula Landry case. Carver is still furious that Strike solved the case instead of the Police and threatens Strike to stay away. Strike and Robin find Whittaker, cohabiting with a young woman he is pimping. So Robin attempts to help her under the guise of Venetia Hall, Robin’s undercover alter-ego. She reveals that, that Whittaker had forced her to have sex with his entire band in a van. Robin concludes that, while Whittaker is abominable, he is not the Shacklewell Ripper and suspects Brockbank is responsible and takes action against him, but instead of thanking her, Strike fires her for gross misconduct concerning Brockbank, then Robin finds herself in real danger when she encounters the real Ripper…

Michelangelo

Italian Renaissance sculptor, painter, architect, poet, and engineer Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni sadly died 18 February 1564. He was born 6 March 1475 in Caprese near Arezzo, Tuscany. Several months after Michelangelo’s birth, the family returned to Florence, where Michelangelo was raised. Michelangelo’s father sent him to study grammar with the Humanist Francesco da Urbino in Florence as a young boy. The young artist, however, showed no interest in his schooling, preferring to copy paintings from churches and seek the company of painters. At thirteen, Michelangelo was apprenticed to the painter Domenico Ghirlandaio. When Michelangelo was only fourteen, his father persuaded Ghirlandaio to pay his apprentice as an artist, which was highly unusual at the time. When in 1489, Lorenzo de’ Medici, de facto ruler of Florence, asked Ghirlandaio for his two best pupils, Ghirlandaio sent Michelangelo and Francesco Granacci. From 1490 to 1492, Michelangelo attended the Humanist academy which the Medici had founded along Neo Platonic lines. Michelangelo studied sculpture under Bertoldo di Giovanni. At the academy, both Michelangelo’s outlook and his art were subject to the influence of many of the most prominent philosophers and writers of the day including Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola and Poliziano. At this time, Michelangelo sculpted the reliefs Madonna of the Steps (1490–1492) and Battle of the Centaurs.

Michelangelo left the security of the Medici court Following Lorenzo de’ Medici’s death on 8 April 1492 and returned to his father’s house. In the following months he carved a wooden crucifix (1493), as a gift to the prior of the Florentine church of Santo Spirito, which had permitted him some studies of anatomy on the corpses of the church’s hospital. Between 1493 and 1494 he bought a block of marble for a larger than life statue of Hercules, which was sent to France and subsequently disappeared sometime circa 18th century. On 20 January 1494, after heavy snowfalls, Lorenzo’s heir, Piero de Medici, commissioned a snow statue, and Michelangelo again entered the court of the Medici.

In the same year, the Medici were expelled from Florence as the result of the rise of Savonarola. Michelangelo left the city before the end of the political upheaval, moving to Venice and then to Bologna. In Bologna, he was commissioned to finish the carving of the last small figures of the Shrine of St. Dominic. Michelangelo arrived in Rome 25 June 1496 at the age of 21. On 4 July of the same year, he began work on a commission for Cardinal Raffaele Riario, an over-life-size statue of the Roman wine god Bacchus.In November 1497, the French ambassador in the Holy See commissioned one of his most famous works, the Pietà. Michelangelo returned to Florence in 1499–1501 and was asked to complete a colossal statue portraying David as a symbol of Florentine freedom, to be placed in the Piazza della Signoria, in front of the Palazzo Vecchio and this was completed in 1504. Michelangelo also painted the Holy Family and St John, also known as the Doni Tondo or the Holy Family of the Tribune. He also may have painted the Madonna and Child with John the Baptist, known as the Manchester Madonna and now in the National Gallery, London, United Kingdom. In 1505, Michelangelo was invited back to Rome by the newly elected Pope Julius II.

He was commissioned to build the Pope’s tomb. During the same period, Michelangelo also took the commission to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, which took approximately four years to complete (1508–1512). Michelangelo was originally commissioned to paint the 12 Apostles against a starry sky, but lobbied for a different and more complex scheme, representing creation, the Downfall of Man and the Promise of Salvation through the prophets and Genealogy of Christ. The work is part of a larger scheme of decoration within the chapel which represents much of the doctrine of the Catholic Church. The composition eventually contained over 300 figures and had at its center nine episodes from the Book of Genesis, divided into three groups: God’s Creation of the Earth; God’s Creation of Humankind and their fall from God’s grace; and lastly, the state of Humanity as represented by Noah and his family. On the pendentives supporting the ceiling are painted twelve men and women who prophesied the coming of the Jesus. They are seven prophets of Israel and five Sibyls, prophetic women of the Classical world.Among the most famous paintings on the ceiling are The Creation of Adam, Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, the Great Flood, the Prophet Isaiah and the Cumaean Sibyl. The fresco of The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel was commissioned by Pope Clement VII.

Michelangelo was also commissioned to reconstruct the façade of the Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence and to adorn it with sculptures. After this Michelangelo eventually left Florence for good in the mid-1530s. In 1546, Michelangelo was appointed architect of St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, and designed its dome., there was concern that Michelangelo would pass away before the dome was finished. However, once building commenced on the lower part of the dome, the supporting ring, the completion of the design was inevitable. Michelangelo sadly died in Rome at the age of 88 (three weeks before his 89th birthday). His body was brought back from Rome for interment at the Basilica of Santa Croce, fulfilling the maestro’s last request to be buried in his beloved Florence.

Len Deighton

British military historian, cookery writer, graphic artist, and novelist Len Deighton was born 18 February 1929 in Marylebone, London, in 1929. His father was a chauffeur and mechanic, and his mother was a part-time cook. At the time they lived in Gloucester Place Mews near Baker Street. His interest in spy stories may have been partially inspired by the arrest of Anna Wolkoff, which he witnessed as an 11-year-old boy. Wolkoff, a British subject of Russian descent, was a Nazi spy. She was detained on 20 May 1940 and subsequently convicted of violating the Official Secrets Act for attempting to pass secret documents to the Nazis.

After leaving school, Deighton worked as a railway clerk before performing his National Service, which he spent as a photographer for the Royal Air Force’s Special Investigation Branch. After discharge from the RAF, he studied at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London in 1949, and in 1952 won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art, graduating in 1955. While he was at the RCA he became a “lifelong friend” of fellow designer Raymond Hawkey, who later designed covers for his early books. Deighton then worked as an airline steward with BOAC. Before he began his writing career he worked as an illustrator in New York and, in 1960, as an art director in a now defunct London advertising agency, Sharps Advertising. He is credited with creating the first British cover for Kerouac’s On the Road. He has since used his drawing skills to illustrate a number of his own military history books.

Following the success of his first novels, Deighton became The Observer’s cookery writer and produced illustrated cookbooks and wrote and drew a weekly strip cartoon-style illustrated cooking guide in London’s The Observer newspaper – Len Deighton’s Cookstrip. At least one of the strips is pinned up in Deighton’s spy hero’s kitchen in the 1965 film of his novel The IPCRESS File. In September 1967 he wrote an article in the Sunday Times Magazine about Operation Snowdrop – an SAS attack on Benghazi during World War II and The following year David Stirling was awarded substantial damages in libel from the article. He also wrote travel guides and became travel editor of Playboy, before becoming a film producer.

After producing a film adaption of his 1968 novel Only When I Larf, Deighton and photographer Brian Duffy bought the film rights to Joan Littlewood’s stage musical Oh, What a Lovely War! Deighton wrote the screenplay and was an uncredited producer of the film but he had his name removed from the credits, however, a move that he later described as “stupid and infantile”. That was his last involvement with the cinema. Deighton left England in 1969 and briefly resided in Blackrock, County Louth, in Ireland, only returning to England apart from personal visits and media appearances, his last one since 1985 being a 2006 interview that formed part of a “Len Deighton Night” on BBC Four.

Several of Deighton’s novels have been adapted for film and television, including The Ipcress File, SS-GB And Funeral In Berlin. His first four novels featured an anonymous anti-hero, named “Harry Palmer” in the films and portrayed by Michael Caine. The first trilogy of his Bernard Samson novel series was made into a twelve-part television series by Granada Television in 1988, and Quentin Tarantino has since expressed interest in filming the trilogy. Deighton also wrote a World War II historical novel Bomber about an RAF Bomber Command raid over Germany is and also reportedly began an unfinished Vietnam War novel, a portion of which appeared as the story First Base in his short story collection Declarations of War. He also wrote Len Deighton’s London Dossier (1967), a guide book to Swinging Sixties London with a “secret agent” theme – contributions from other writers are described as “surveillance reports” and his 1977 novel Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain was said by Albert Speer (once Hitler’s Minister of Armaments) to be “an excellent, most thorough examination”.

Enzo Ferrari

Italian motor racing legend and entrepreneur, the founder of the Scuderia Ferrari Grand Prix motor racing team and Ferrari automobile marque Enzo Ferrari, was born February 18, 1898 in Modena, Italy. Ferrari grew up with little formal education but a strong desire to race cars. At the age of 10 and seeing 1908 Circuit di Bologna, he decided to become a racing Driver.During World War I he was assigned to the third Alpine Artillery division of the Italian Army. His father Alfredo, as well as his older brother, also named Alfredo, died in 1916 as a result of a widespread Italian flu outbreak. Ferrari became severely ill himself in the 1918 flu pandemic and was consequently discharged from Italian service. Upon returning home he found that the family firm had collapsed. Having no other job prospects, Ferrari eventually settled for a job at a smaller car company called CMN (Costruzioni Meccaniche Nazionali), redesigning used truck bodies into small passenger cars. He took up racing in 1919 on the CMN team, but had little initial success.

He left CMN in 1920 to work at Alfa Romeo and racing their cars in local races he had more success. In 1923, racing in Ravenna, he acquired the Prancing Horse badge which decorated the fuselage of Francesco Baracca’s (Italy’s leading ace of WWI) SPAD S.XIII fighter, given from his mother, taken from the wreckage of the plane after his mysterious death. This icon would have to wait until 1932 to be displayed on a racing car.In 1924 Ferrari won the Coppa Acerbo at Pescara. His successes in local races encouraged Alfa to offer him a chance of much more prestigious competition. Ferrari turned this opportunity down and did not race again until 1927. He continued to work directly for Alfa Romeo until 1929 before starting Scuderia Ferrari as the racing team for Alfa.Ferrari managed the development of the factory Alfa cars, and built up a team of over forty drivers, including Giuseppe Campari and Tazio Nuvolari. Ferrari himself continued racing until 1932.

The support of Alfa Romeo lasted until 1933. Only at the intervention of Pirelli did Ferrari receive any cars at all. Despite the quality of the Scuderia drivers, the company won few victories. Auto Union and Mercedes dominated the era, but Ferrari achieved a notable victory when Tazio Nuvolari beat them on their home turf at the German Grand Prix in 1935.In 1937 Alfa took control of its racing efforts again, reducing Ferrari to Director of Sports under Alfa’s engineering director. Ferrari soon left, but a contract clause restricted him from racing or designing cars for four years.In response, Ferrari organized Auto-Avio Costruzioni, a company supplying parts to other racing teams. Ferrari did manage to manufacture two cars for the 1940 Mille Miglia, driven by Alberto Ascari and Lotario Rangoni. During World War II his firm was forced to undertake war production for Mussolini’s fascist government. Following Allied bombing of the factory, Ferrari relocated from Modena to Maranello. It was not until after World War II that Ferrari could start making cars bearing his name, founding today’s Ferrari S.p.A. in 1947.

The first open-wheel race was in Turin in 1948 and the first victory came later in the year in Lago di Garda. Ferrari participated in the Formula 1 World Championship since its introduction in 1950 but the first victory was not until the British Grand Prix of 1951. The first championship came in 1952–53, with Alberto Ascari. The company also sold production sports cars in order to finance the racing endeavours not only in Grands Prix but also in events such as the Mille Miglia and Le Mans. Ferrari’s decision to continue racing in the Mille Miglia brought the company new victories and greatly increased public recognition. However, increasing speeds, poor roads, and nonexistent crowd protection eventually spelled disaster for both the race and Ferrari. During the 1957 Mille Miglia, near the town of Guidizzolo, a 4.0-litre Ferrari 335S driven by the flamboyant Alfonso de Portago was traveling at 250 km/h when it blew a tire and crashed into the roadside crowd, killing de Portago, his co-driver, and nine spectators, including five children. In response, Enzo Ferrari and Englebert, the tyre manufacturer, were charged with manslaughter in a lengthy criminal prosecution that was finally dismissed in 1961. Many of the firm’s greatest victories came at Le Mans (14 victories, including six in a row 1960–65) and in Formula One during the 1950s and 1960s, with the successes of Juan-Manuel Fangio (1956), Mike Hawthorn (1958), Phil Hill (1961) and John Surtees (1964).

1969 the problems of reduced demand and inadequate financing forced Ferrari to allow Fiat to take a stake in the company. Ferrari had previously offered Ford the opportunity to buy the firm in 1963 for US$18 million but, late in negotiations, Ferrari withdrew once he realised that he would not have been able to retain control of the company sporting program. Ferrari became joint-stock and Fiat took a small share in 1965 and then in 1969 they increased their holding to 50% of the company. (In 1988 Fiat’s holding rose to 90%). In 1974 Ferrari nominated Luca Cordero di Montezemolo sporting director. Niki Lauda won the championship in 1975 and 1977. After those successes and another title for Jody Scheckter in 1979, the company’s Formula One championship hopes fell into the doldrums.1982 opened with a strong car, the 126C2, world-class drivers, and promising results in the early races. However, Gilles Villeneuve was killed in the 126C2 in May, and team mate Didier Pironi had his career cut short in a violent end over end flip on the misty back straight at Hockenheim in August. Pironi had been leading the driver’s championship at the time. Ferrari remained chairman of the company until his death in 1988 but the team would not see championship glory again during his lifetime.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain was first published on 18 February 1885 in the United States and 10th December 1884 In the United Kingdom. It concerns and is narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn, a friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer which take place along the Mississippi River.

The story begins in St. Petersburg, Missouri, on the shore of the Mississippi River, between 1835 and 1845 (when the first steamboat sailed down the Mississippi). It features Two young boys, Tom Sawyer & Huckleberry Finn. Huck is currently living with Widow Douglas, and her sister Miss Watson, who are attempting to civilize him and Tom Sawyer helps him to escape one night past Miss Watson’s slave Jim. However, his abusive drunk father “Pap”, sudden reappears, and he moves into a remote cabin, however he dislikes his Father’s drunken violence, so he escapes and sets off down the Mississippi River.While living quite comfortably in the wilderness along the Mississippi, Huck encounters Miss Watson’s slave Jim on an island called Jackson’s Island. Huck learns that Jim has also run away & is trying to make his way to Cairo, Illinois, and then to Ohio. Whilst traveling the Mississippi together Finn learns about Jim’s difficult past and the horrors of slavery.

Huck and Jim take residence In a cavern on a hill on Jackson’s Island, scrounging for food until they find a raft. Later, they encounter an entire house floating down the river and enter it to grab what they can, but they find a dead man, shot in the back while apparently trying to ransack the house. The sheriff learns of this and sends a Posse, then Whilst escaping Finn and Jim become separated. Finn seeks shelter with a prosperous family called the Grangerfords and befriends Buck Grangerford, a boy about his age, but unwittingly gets involved in the Grangerfords blood feud against another family, the Shepherdsons which comes to a head when Buck’s sister, Sophia Grangerford, elopes with Harney Shepherdson. In the resulting conflict, all the Grangerford males from this branch of the family are shot and killed, and Huck narrowly avoids his own death in the gunfight,

Finn and Jim then Sail farther south on the Mississippi River, and rescue two cunning grifters, who join Them on the raft. The younger of the two swindlers, a man of about thirty, introduces himself as a son of an English duke (the Duke of Bridgewater) and his father’s rightful successor. The older one, about seventy, then trumps the Duke’s claim by alleging that he is the Lost Dauphin, the son of Louis XVI and rightful King of France. He continually mispronounces the duke’s title as “Bilgewater” in conversation.The Duke and the King then join Jim and Huck on the raft, committing a series of confidence schemes on the way south. To allow for Jim’s presence, they print fake bills for an escaped slave; and later they paint him up entirely in blue and call him the “Sick Arab”. On one occasion they arrive in a town and advertise a three-night engagement of a play which they call “The Royal Nonesuch”. The play turns out to be only a couple of minutes of hysterical cavorting, not worth anywhere near the 50 cents the townsmen were charged to see it. ThenA drunk called Boggs arrives in town and threatens a southern gentleman by the name of Colonel Sherburn. so Sherburn kills him and almost gets lynched. By the third night of “The Royal Nonesuch”, the townspeople are getting fed up but the Duke and the King have already skipped town, and together with Huck and Jim, they continue down the river.

ln the next town they decide to impersonate two brothers of Peter Wilks, a recently deceased man of property, and manage to convince nearly all the townspeople that he is one of the brothers, a preacher just arrived from England, while the Duke pretends to be a deaf-mute to match accounts of the other brother. One man in town is certain that they are a fraud and confronts them. Afterwards, the Duke, suggests that they should cut and run. The King boldly states his intention to continue to liquidate Wilks’ estate.However Huck likes Wilks’ daughters, who treat him with kindness and courtesy, so he tries to thwart the grifters’ plans by stealing back the inheritance money. The arrival of two new men who seem to be the real brothers throws everything into confusion when none of their signatures match the one on record. The townspeople devise a test, which requires digging up the coffin to check. When the money is found in Wilks’ coffin, the Duke and the King are able to escape in the confusion. They manage to rejoin Huck and Jim on the raft & Huck resolves to free Jim, who is being held at the plantation of Silas and Sally Phelps. Huck intercepts Tom on the road and tells him everything, Tom joins Huck’s scheme & develops an elaborate plan to free Jim…

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Satirizes a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. Finn struggles not only with the challenges of his strenuous journey, but also with the 19th century attitudes concerning his friendship with Jim which is at odds with the prevailing social Attitude towards African American culture. The novel has also been adapted for film amd Television numerous times.