Tim Curry

British actor, voice actor and singer Tim Curry was born 19 April 1946 in Grappenhall, Cheshire. Curry spent most of his childhood in Plymouth, Devon; but, after his father’s death from pneumonia in 1958, his family moved to South London. Curry then went to boarding school and attended Kingswood School in Bath, Somerset. He developed into a talented boy soprano (treble). Deciding to concentrate on acting, Curry graduated from the University of Birmingham with a combined degree in English and Drama (BA Drama & Theatre Studies, 1968).

Curry’s first full-time role was as part of the original London cast of the musical Hair in 1968, where he first met Richard O’Brien who went on to write The role of, Dr Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Show. Originally, Curry rehearsed the character with a German accent and peroxide blond hair, and later, with an American accent. Curry originally thought the character was merely a laboratory doctor dressed in a white lab coat. However, at the suggestion of director Sharman, the character evolved into the diabolical mad scientist and transvestite with an upper class Belgravia accent that carried over to the cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show and made Curry both a star and a cult figure. He continued to play the character in London, Los Angeles and New York City until 1975.

Shortly after the end of Rocky Horror’s run on Broadway, Curry returned to the stage with Tom Stoppard’s Travesties, which ran in London and New York from 1975 to 1976. Travesties was a Broadway hit which won two Tony Awards (Best Performance by an Actor for John Wood and Best Comedy), as well as the New York Drama Critics Circle Award (Best Play), and Curry’s performance as the famous dadaist Tristan Tzara received good reviews. In 1981, Curry formed part of the original cast in the Broadway show Amadeus, playing the title character, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He was nominated for his first Tony Award (Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play) for this role, but lost out to his co-star Ian McKellen, who played Antonio Salieri. In 1982, Curry took the part of the Pirate King in the Drury Lane production of Joe Papp’s version of The Pirates of Penzance opposite George Cole.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released on film in 1975 and became a huge international cult classic. After this success Curry began to star in many films, acting in supporting roles, such as Robert Graves in the British horror film The Shout, as Johnny LaGuardia in the cult classic, Times Square, as Daniel “Rooster” Hannigan in Annie, and as Jeremy Hancock in the political film The Ploughman’s Lunch. He also performed in The Rivals and in several plays with the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain, including The Threepenny Opera, Dalliance and Love For Love. In 1988, Curry did the national tour of Me and My Girl as the lead role of Bill Snibson.

Between 1989-90, Tim Curry returned once again to the New York stage in The Art of Success. In 1982 Curry portrayed Rooster Hannigan in the film adaptation of Annie, he also portrayed The Prince ofDarkness in the fantasy film Legend, directed by Ridley Scott. Curry appeared as Wadsworth in the mystery comedy film Clue, as Pennywise in the horror miniseries It and as Nigel Thornberry on the animated television series The Wild Thornberrys. Curry also starred as. Ray Porter in Pass the Ammo, Dr Thornton Poole in Oscar, Mr Hector in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Jigsaw in Loaded Weapon 1 and as Long John Silver in Muppet Treasure Island. He portrayed Dr Yevgeniy Petrov, in The Hunt for Red October and appeared in the 1993 reboot of The Three Musketeers as Cardinal Richelieu, he also appeared in the superhero film The Shadow as Farley Claymore and as Herkermer Homolka in the 1995 action adventure Congo. In 1993, Curry played Alan Swann in the Broadway musical version of My Favourite Year, earning a second Tony Award nomination, for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. Curry also starred in Charlie’s Angels as Roger Corwin, in Scary Movie 2 playing Professor Oldman. And he portrayed Thurnam Rice, in the critically acclaimed biographical film Kinsey.

In 2001, Curry starred as Scrooge in the musical version of A Christmas Carol that played at Madison Square Garden. In 2004, Curry began his role of King Arthur in Spamalot in Chicago. Moving to Broadway in 2005 earning him a third Tony nomination, for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. in 2006 Curry reprised this role in London’s West End at the Palace Theatre. He was nominated for a Laurence Olivier Award as the Best Actor in a Musical for the role, and also won the Theatregoers’ Choice Award them in 2012, Tim Curry appeared in Eric Idle’s play What About Dick? at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. In 2015 Curry was awarded an Artistic Achievement Award at the Actors Fund 19th Annual Tony Awards viewing Party.

Curry has also appeared in many television series, such as Eugene in Napoleon and Love, and guest roles in Armchair Theatre, Play for Today. He appeared in The courtroom drama Wiseguy, as Winston Newquay, the science fiction television series Earth 2 and the sitcom Rude Awakening. He has also guest starred in Roseanne, Tales from the Crypt, Lexx, The Naked Truth, Monk, Will & Grace, Psych, Agatha Christie’s Poirot and Criminal Minds. Curry has also appeared in a large number of television films and miniseries, including Three Men in a Boat, the titular role in Will Shakespeare, playing the role of Bill Sikes in a television adaptation of Oliver Twist, the children’s classic The Worst Witch, Titanic, Terry Pratchett’s The Colour of Magic (as Trymon)Alice and Return to Cranford. One of Curry’s best-known television roles, and best-known roles overall, is Pennywise the Dancing Clown in the 1990 horror miniseries Stephen King’s It.

Curry has also lent his voice talents to a large number of animated television series and films, such as the Serpent in The Greatest Adventure: Stories from the Bible and Captain Hook in the Fox animated series Peter Pan and the Pirates For which Curry won a Daytime Emmy Award. He also portrays Nigel Thornberry in The Wild Thornberrys. He also played the antagonist roles in animated series such as MAL in Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Skullmaster in Mighty Max, Dr Anton Sevarius in Gargoyles, George Herbert Walker ‘King’ Chicken in Duckman, Lord Dragaunus in The Mighty Ducks, Professor Finbar Calamitous in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, Slagar the Cruel in Redwall and G. Gordon Godfrey in Young Justice. He also appeared in FernGully: The Last Rainforest, The Pebble and the Penguin, all three Rugrats films, Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas, Scooby-Doo! and the Witch’s Ghost, The Wild, The Cat Returns, Valiant, Garfield: Tail of Two Kitties, Fly Me to the Moon.Curry’s voice also appears in numerous video games, such as, Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers and Gabriel Knight 3: Blood of the Sacred, Blood of the Damned, where he voiced the title character, Gabriel Knight, Toonstruck, Sacrifice, Brütal Legend and Dragon Age: Origins. His audio book work includes Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, Geraldine McCaughrean’s Peter Pan in Scarlet, Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the Abhorsen trilogy by Garth Nix.

He has also had some success as a solo musical artist, Having received classical vocal training as a boy, his musical influences included jazz vocalists such as Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong as well as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. He released his debut solo album Read My Lips. in 1978 which featured an eclectic range of songs (mostly covers) performed in diverse genres such as a reggae version of the Beatles’ song “I Will”, a rendition of “Wake Nicodemus” featuring the Pipes and Drums of the 48th Highlanders of Canada, and a bar-room ballad, “Alan”, composed by Canadian singer/songwriter Tony Kosinec. In 1979, Curry released his second album Fearless. The LP was more rock-oriented than Read My Lips and mostly featured original songs rather than cover versions such as: “I Do the Rock” and “Paradise Garage”. Curry’s third and final album, Simplicity, was released in 1981 and In 1989 The Best of Tim Curry was released featuring songs from his albums (including a live version of “Alan”) and a previously unreleased song, a live cover version of Bob Dylan’s “Simple Twist of Fate”. He also recorded a nine-track album for Lou Adler’s Ode Records in 1976 Which was eventually released as …From the Vaults in 2010 and included Curry’s rendition of the Supremes’ hit “Baby Love”.

Dudley Moore CBE

Best known as being one half of classic comedy duo Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, The late great English actor, comedian and composer Dudley Moore CBE, was Born 19th April 1935, He first came to prominence as one of the four writer-performers in the ground-breaking comedy revue Beyond the Fringe in the early 1960s, and then became famous as half of the highly popular television double-act he formed with Peter Cook. His fame as a comedy film actor was later heightened by success in hit Hollywood films such as 10 with Bo Derek and Arthur in the late 1970s and early 1980s, respectively. He received an Oscar nomination for the latter role. He was frequently referred to in the media as “Cuddly Dudley” or “The Sex Thimble”, a reference to his short stature and reputation as a “ladies’ man”.

AN AUDIENCE with Dudley MOORE http://youtu.be/bRShQGG5zDo

He had a prolific film career and appeared in many other films too including The Wrong Box, Bedazzled, 30 Is a Dangerous Age, Cynthia, The Bed-Sitting Room, Monte Carlo or Bust, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Hound of the Baskervilles, Foul Play, 10, Derek and Clive Get the Horn, Wholly Moses! Arthur, Six Weeks, Lovesick, Romantic Comedy, Unfaithfully Yours, Micki + Maude, Best Defense, Santa Claus: The Movie Like Father Like Son Arthur 2: On the Rocks The Adventures of Milo and Otis, Crazy People, Blame It on the Bellboy, Really Wild Animals, Dudley Daddy’s Girls, Parallel Lives, The Disappearance of Kevin Johnson and The Mighty Kong.

Sadly On 30 September 1999, Moore announced that he was suffering from the terminal degenerative brain disorder progressive supranuclear palsy, some of whose early symptoms were so similar to intoxication that he had been accused of being drunk, and that the illness had been diagnosed earlier in the year. In recognition of his outstanding contribution to Comedy Moore was appointed a Commander of the Order of The British Empire (CBE) in 2001 and Despite his deteriorating condition, he attended the ceremony, mute and wheelchair-bound, at Buckingham Palace to collect his honour. He died on 27 March 2002, as a result of pneumonia, secondary to immobility caused by the palsy, in Plainfield, New Jersey. Rena Fruchter was holding his hand when he died, and she reported his final words were, “I can hear the music all around me.” Moore was interred in Hillside Cemetery in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. Fruchter later wrote a memoir of their relationship (Dudley Moore, Ebury Press, 2004). In December 2004, Channel 4 broadcast Not Only But Always, a TV movie dramatising the relationship between Moore and Cook, although the principal focus of the production was on Cook. The relationship between the two was also the subject of a stage play called Pete and Dud: Come Again.

The Simpsons

Animated Shorts of The Simpsons first aired on The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. Created by Matt Groening and producer James L. Brooks for the Fox Broadcasting Company, The Simpsons is a satirical depiction of a dysfunctional middle class American lifestyle epitomized by the Simpson family who live in a fictional middle American Town of Springfield and it parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition. The Simpsons consist of Homer, the father, who works as a safety inspector at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant, a position at odds with his careless, buffoonish personality. Homer’s wife Marge Simpson, a stereotypical American housewife and mother, and three children: Bart, a ten-year-old troublemaker; Lisa, a precocious eight-year-old activist; and Maggie, the baby of the family who rarely speaks, but communicates by sucking on a pacifier. Although the family is dysfunctional, they are often shown to care about one another.

The show also includes an array of quirky supporting characters: co-workers, teachers, family friends, extended relatives, townspeople and local celebrities. The creators originally intended many of these characters as one-time jokes or for fulfilling needed functions in the town. A number of them have gained expanded roles and subsequently starred in their own episodes. Despite the depiction of yearly milestones such as holidays or birthdays passing, the characters do not age between episodes (either physically or in stated age), and generally appear just as they did when the series began. The series uses a floating timeline in which episodes generally take place in the year the episode is produced even though the characters do not age. Flashbacks/forwards do occasionally depict the characters at other points in their lives, with the timeline of these depictions also generally floating relative to the year the episode is produced.

The Simpsons takes place in the fictional American town of Springfield in an unknown and impossible-to-determine U.S. state. The show is intentionally evasive in regard to Springfield’s location. Springfield’s geography, and that of its surroundings, contains coastlines, deserts, vast farmland, tall mountains, or whatever the story or joke requires.Groening has said that Springfield has much in common with Portland, Oregon, the city where he grew up. The name “Springfield” is a common one in America and appears in 22 states. Groening has said that he named it after Springfield, Oregon, and the fictitious Springfield which was the setting of the series Father Knows Best.An astronomer and fan of the show, Phil Plait, noticed that The Simpsons could be set in Australia, because the moon in Springfield faces the wrong way to be an American location. It is drawn facing the right, as it would in the Southern Hemisphere.

Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has broadcast 569 episodes, and the 26th season began on September 28, 2014. The Simpsons is the longest-running American sitcom, the longest-running American animated program, and in 2009 it surpassed Gunsmoke as the longest-running American scripted primetime television series. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released on July 27, 2007. The Simpsons has received widespread critical acclaim. Time magazine named it the 20th century’s best television series, and The A.V. Club named it “television’s crowning achievement regardless of format”. On January 14, 2000, the Simpson family was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 31 Primetime Emmy Awards, 30 Annie Awards, and a Peabody Award. Homer’s exclamatory catchphrase “D’oh!” Was inspired by James Finlayson (Laurel and Hardy) and has been adopted into the English language, while The Simpsons has influenced and parodied many television sitcoms, films, events and musicians.