Barry Gibb (BeeGees)

Barry Gibb,singer-songwriter and producer with the Bee Gees was born 1 September 1946. He is (unfortunately) the only surviving brother of the Bee Gees who With their trademark falsetto harmonies, helped turn disco into a global phenomenon with hits including Stayin’ Alive and Night Fever, which featured on the soundtrack of the 1977 film Saturday Night Fever, starring John Travolta.The Bee Gees sold more than 200 million records and notched up dozens of hits during a career spanning more than half a century.

The three Gibb brothers made their earliest performances at local movie theatres in Manchester in 1955, singing between shows.After emigrating to Australia with their parents, the Gibb brothers returned to England in the mid-1960s to further their singing careers. Their early recordings, including dramatic hits such as Massachusetts (1967), drew comparisons with the Beatles. The trio reached the Top Ten with I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You and I Started a Joke (both 1968) but split briefly after the relative failure of their concept album Odessa (1969). They reunited in 1970 and had hits with Lonely Days (1970) and How Can You Mend a Broken Heart (1971). They released the next album Main Course in 1975 – in which they produced a new sound – the emphasis being on dance rhythms, high harmonies, and a funk beat, this propelled The the Bee Gees to the forefront of the disco movement, which their work on the sound track album of the film Saturday Night Fever (1977) would popularise and define.

Subsequently, they became among the most successful vocal groups in rock and roll history, and went on to sell more than 200 million albums.Gibb and his brothers seemed to have a natural talent that allowed them to write hit songs with ease and this helped them become the first and only songwriters to place five songs in the Top Ten at the same time, and the song Jive Talkin’, became their second American number one single, and was followed up with Nights on Broadway and then the album Children of the World, which yielded the hits You Should Be Dancing and Love So Right.Their success was not limited to recordings issued under their own name either. Individually and together they’ve also written and produced major hits for artists including Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers, as well as Frankie Valli. In 1997 the band was also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Sadly though his younger brothers Maurice and Robin Gibb both passed away recently, but they have left the world some fantastic music.

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Prolific Adventure & Science Fiction Novelist Edgar Rice Burroughs was born on September 1, 1875, in Chicago, Illinois (he later lived for many years in the suburb of Oak Park). he was educated at a number of local schools, and during the Chicago influenza epidemic in 1891, he spent a half year at his brother’s ranch on the Raft River in Idaho. He then attended the Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and then the Michigan Military Academy. Graduating in 1895, and failing the entrance exam for the United States Military Academy (West Point), he ended up as an enlisted soldier with the 7th U.S. Cavalry in Fort Grant, Arizona Territory.

After being diagnosed with a heart problem and thus ineligible to serve, he was discharged in 1897. Some drifting and ranch work followed in Idaho. Then, Burroughs found work at his father’s firm in 1899. He married childhood sweetheart Emma Hulbert (1876-1944) in January 1900. In 1904 he left his job and found less regular work; some in Idaho, later in Chicago.By 1911, after seven years of low wages, he began to write fiction. By this time, Burroughs and Emma had two children, Joan (1908–72), who would later marry Tarzan film actor James Pierce, and Hulbert (1909–91).During this period, he had copious spare time and he began reading many pulp fiction magazines. In 1929 he recalled thinking that …if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those magazines, that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines.

So he started writing the exciting science fiction series Barsoom, which debuted in 1912 and featured a Confederate American Civil War veteren from Virginia named John Carter, who inexplicably finds himself transported to the planet Mars and discovers that far from being dead, Mars, which is known as “Barsoom” by the locals) is actually inhabited by 12-foot tall barbarians called Tharks, Intelligent & scientifically minded red skinned people from the neighbouring City of Helium, villainous Warlords, intelligent Therns, Pirates, Giant White Apes and vicious thug like Warhoons. Carter discovers that the land is in turmoil and the various inhabitants are at war with each other over the planets dwindling resources and the situation is being manipulated by shadowy forces. So he undertakes a perilous journey across Barsoom, encountering many dangers along the way, in order to unite the population against a common enemy and fairly soon he finds himself in the midst of all-out war between the forces of good and those of destruction, the outcome of which will determine the fate of everyone on Barsoom.

Burroughs also produced works in many other genres including The Land That Time Forgot (1918), and had his first story, “Under the Moons of Mars”, serialized in All-Story Magazine in 1912. Burroughs soon took up writing full-time and by the time the run of Under the Moons of Mars had finished he had completed two novels, including Tarzan of the Apes, which was published from October 1912 and which went on to become one of his most successful series. Burroughs also wrote popular science fiction and fantasy stories involving Earthly adventurers transported to various planets (notably Barsoom, Burroughs’ fictional name for Mars, and Amtor, his fictional name for Venus), lost islands, and into the interior of the hollow earth in his Pellucidar stories, as well as westerns and historical romances. Along with All-Story, many of his stories were published in The Argosy. Many of his novels have also been adapted from film including Tarzan of the Apes, Land that time Forgot and John Carter and there is also a sequel to John Carter in the works.

Thanks to the enduring popularity of the Barsoom and Tarzan series of novels Burroughs set up his own company, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc In 1923 and began printing his own books throughout the 1930s.Then In 1941 At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Burroughs was a resident of Hawaii and, despite being in his late sixties, he applied for permission to become a war correspondent. This permission was granted, and so he became one of the oldest war correspondents for the U.S. during World War II. When the war ended, Burroughs moved back to Encino, California, where, after many health problems, he died of a heart attack on March 19, 1950, having written almost 80 novels and created many popular enduring characters Including the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter.

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway was published 1 September 1951. It tells the story of a battle between an aging, experienced fisherman, Santiago, and a large marlin. The story opens with Santiago having gone 84 days without catching a fish. his young apprentice, Manolin, has been forbidden by his parents to sail with him however The boy visits Santiago’s shack each night, hauling his fishing gear, preparing food, talking about American baseball and his favorite player, Joe DiMaggio. Santiago tells Manolin that on the next day, he will venture far out into the Gulf Stream, north of Cuba in the Straits of Florida to fish, confident that his unlucky streak is near its end.

On the eighty-fifth day of his unlucky streak, Santiago takes his skiff into the Gulf Stream, sets his lines and by noon, has his bait taken by a big fish which he is Unable to land as is instead pulled by the marlin, and two days and nights pass with Santiago holding onto the line. Though wounded by the struggle and in pain, Santiago expresses respect for his adversary, o
By the third day Santiago, is worn out and almost delirious, uses all his remaining strength to evntually land the Marlin and heads home.

Unfortunately On his way in to shore, sharks are attracted to the marlin’s blood. Santiago fights back determined to hold onto his catch, however the sharks persist, and by nightfall the sharks have almost devoured the marlin’s entire carcass, leaving a skeleton consisting mostly of its backbone, its tail and its head. Santiago knows that he is defeated and sails home where he falls asleep from exhaustionMeanwhile A group of fishermen gather around the boat where the fish’s skeleton is still attached. One of the fishermen measures it to be 18 feet (5.5 m) from nose to tail. Pedrico is given the head of the fish. Manolin, upon waking Santiago promises to start fishing again with Manolin

American author and journalist Ernest Hemingway was Born July 21, 1899. Hemingway was raised in Oak Park, Illinois. Ernest Hemingway’s mother Grace Hall Hemingway began writing about him, in a series of scrapbooks documenting the future author’s childhood, She began by describing how the sun shone and robins sang on the day in July 1899 when Hemingway was born. The scrapbooks also contain childhood paintings and tell of Hemingway playing the cello, suiting up for a ‘lightweight’ football squad and taking up boxing. During his junior year of high school, he was on his school’s prom committee and, according to a report card note from his Latin teacher, showed ‘improvement both in attitude and work.’

By the time Hemingway was five, his mother noted that he was collecting war cartoons and had an appreciation for characters with courage.’He loves stories about Great Americans,’ she wrote.The scrapbooks have a plethora of family photos from the Hemingway family’s home in Oak Park, Illinois, and their vacation cottage on a lake in Northern Michigan, including shots of a bare-bottomed baby Hemingway playing in the water by a canoe.They include letters to Hemingway and others he wrote as a child, including a note of contrition in which he confessed to bad behavior in church.’My conduct tomorrow will be good,’ 13-year-old Hemingway promised.

As Hemingway matured, the scrapbooks showcased his earliest attempts at the craft that would come to define his professional life. Among them were a short story from his high school’s literary magazine, clippings from some of his first assignments as a high school newspaper reporter and a sonnet in which 16-year-old Hemingway seemed to poke fun at himself.’Nobody likes Ernest, that, is straight stuff,’ he said, ‘and when he writes stories – we all cry “Enough.”

After high school he reported for a few months for The Kansas City Star, before leaving for the Italian front to enlist with the World War I ambulance drivers. However In 1918, he was seriously wounded and returned home. His wartime experiences formed the basis for his novel A Farewell to Arms. In 1922, he married Hadley Richardson, the first of his four wives. The couple moved to Paris, where he worked as a foreign correspondent, and fell under the influence of the modernist writers and artists of the 1920s “Lost Generation” expatriate community. The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway’s first novel, was published in 1926.

Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short stories and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are considered classics of American literature and . His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image also influenced later generations.

In 1927 Hemingway divorced his first wife Hadley Richardson and married Pauline Pfeiffer, However They also divorced after he returned from the Spanish Civil War where he had acted as a journalist, and after which he wrote For Whom the Bell Tolls. Martha Gellhorn became his third wife in 1940. They separated when he met Mary Welsh in London during World War II; during which he was present at the Normandy Landings and liberation of Paris. Shortly after the publication of The Old Man and the Sea in 1952, Hemingway went on safari to Africa, where he was almost killed in two successive plane crashes that left him in pain or ill-health for much of the rest of his life.

During the 1930s and 1940s, Hemingway had permanent residences in Key West, Florida, and Cuba however in 1959 he moved from Cuba to Ketchum, Idaho, where sadly he committed suicide on July 2, 1961. However A farewell to Arms remains a popular novel and ‘The scrapbooks his Mother created are part of the collection that Hemingway’s widow, Mary, gifted to the JFK Library and Museum after the author’s 1961 suicide and The contents of five Hemingway scrapbooks are also available online, giving fans and scholars the chance to follow the life of one of the 20th century’s literary greats from diapers to high school degree.

Voyage dans le Lune

Film pioneer Georges Melies’ Classic French silent movie A Trip to the Moon,(voyage dans le Lune) was released in France on 1 September 1902. Directed by Georges Méliès. It is considered one of the first science fiction films and was Inspired by a wide variety of sources. It follows a group of astronomers from the Astonomers Club whose president, Professor Barbenfouillis (“Messybeard” proposes a trip to the Moon. After addressing some dissent, six brave astronomers agree to the plan. They build a space capsule in the shape of a bullet, and construct a huge cannon to shoot it into space. The astronomers embark and their capsule is fired from the cannon with the help of “marines”, most of whom are portrayed as a bevy of beautiful women in sailors’ outfits, while the rest are men. The Man in the Moon watches the capsule as it approaches, and it hits him in the eye. (The image is a visual pun: the phrase dans l’œil, literally “in the eye,” is the French equivalent of the English word “bullseye.”Landing safely on the Moon, the astronomers get out of the capsule and watch the Earth rise in the distance. Exhausted by their journey, the astronomers unroll their blankets and sleep.

As they sleep, a comet passes, the Big Dipper appears with human faces peering out of each star, old Saturn leans out of a window in his ringed planet, and Phoebe, goddess of the Moon, appears seated in a crescent-moon swing. Phoebe calls down a snowfall that awakens the astronomers. They seek shelter in a cavern and discover giant mushrooms. One astronomer opens his umbrella; it promptly takes root and turns into a giant mushroom itself. At this point, a Selenite (an insectoid alien inhabitant of the Moon, named after one of the Greek moon goddesses, Selene) appears, The Selenites arrest the astronomers and bring them to their commander at the Selenite palace. The astronomers manage to escape and run back to their capsule while avoiding the pursuing Selenites, A Selenite tries to seize the capsule at the last minute. Astronomer, capsule, and Selenite fall through space and land in an ocean on Earth. The Selenite falls off and the capsule floats back to the surface, where they are rescued by a ship and towed ashore. The final sequence (missing from some American prints of the film) depicts a celebratory parade in honor of the travelers’ return, including the unveiling of a commemorative statue bearing the motto “Labor omnia vincit” (Latin: “work conquers all”)

The film was released by Méliès’s Star Film Company and is numbered 399–411 in its catalogues. Its total length is about 260 meters (roughly 845 feet) of film, which, at Méliès’s preferred projection speed of 12 to 14 frames per second, is about 17 minutes. An internationally popular success at the time of its release, it is the best-known of the hundreds of films made by Méliès, and the moment in which the spaceship lands in the Moon’s eye remains one of the most iconic images in the history of cinema.it waas named one of the 100 greatest films of the 20th century by The Village Voice, ranking at #84,and in 2002 it became the first work designated as a UNESCO World Heritage film. French duo Air were also asked to provide a sound track for a restored colourised version of the film which was released in 2012. The film also inspired the promo video for the Smashing Pumpkin song Tonight Tonight and is referenced often in the film Hugo by Martin Scorses which is based on the novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznik.