Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Glala 2018

The Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala takes place from September 20th – 23rd 2018. Visiting locomotives to this event include LMS 4-6-0 Royal Scot class Locomotive No. 46100 Royal Scot. The Royal Scot was Built in 1927, And was the flagship locomotive of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company, operating the fastest services on the West Coast from London to Manchester and Glasgow. Later in its life, No. 46100 was chosen to appear on behalf of Britain at the 1933 ‘Century of Progress’ exhibition in Chicago, USA. The locomotive, as well as a full rake of carriages, were shipped to the United States and appeared not only at the exhibition, but also toured the USA and Canada, even crossing the Rocky Mountains. It made its debut at the Severn Valley Railway following overhaul in 2015 and is making a welcome return to the Severn Valley Railway in 2018 for the Autumn Steam Gala

LMS 46100 Royal Scot

The second visitor to the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala, is LMS Princess Coronation Class 4-6-2 “Pacific” No.46233 ‘Duchess of Sutherland’ . This was built in 1938 by Crewe Works for the London Midland and Scottish Railway. Built as a high speed express passenger locomotive, 46233 was built to haul fast express passenger services such as ‘The Royal Scot’ and ‘The Mid-Day Scot’ between London Euston and Glasgow Central as well as other expresses to Liverpool.

6233 was outshopped in July 1938 from Crewe Works and was part of the third batch of her class. These were unstreamlined, painted in LMS standard crimson lake livery and had a single chimney and no smoke deflectors and an estimated cost of £13,800 each. 6233 was initially allocated to Camden, London. It acquired a double chimney in March 1941 and because of drifting smoke acquired smoke deflectors in September 1945 before being painted in postwar LMS black livery in September 1946. With the creation of British Railways on 1 January 1948 it was allocated to Crewe North depot. BR renumbered the locomotive to 46233 in October 1948 and repainted it in BR Brunswick green livery in 1952 or early 1953. In June 1958 it was allocated to Carlisle Upperby before eventually being withdrawn from Edge Hill depot in February 1964. During its 25 years service Duchess of Sutherland ran 1,650,000 miles – the second highest mileage by any member of the class.

It was Withdrawn by British Railways in 1964, the locomotive was originally sold to Butlins holiday camp in Scotland. In 1996, the locomotive was acquired by The Princess Royal Class Locomotive Trust with the intention of restoration to mainline condition . By 2001, 46233 had been restored to operating condition and since then has been a regular performer on the national network. On 6 March 2010, 6233 was rolled out in LMS lined black livery, which was retained during 2010, before a major overhaul, taking 6233 out of service for the 2011 season. On 3 March 2012, now renumbered 46233 it was rolled out in “authentic (Brunswick) green” livery, as used by British Railways during the early 1950s, at the Midland Railway – Butterley following a major overhaul. Since then it has been again be repainted in LMS Crimson Lake and renumbered LMS 6233.

Princess Coronation class 2-6-4 Pacific 6233 “Duchess of Sutherland”

The third visiting locomotive for the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala is British Rail Standard class 7 4-6-2 Pacific No. 70000 Britannia. Britannia was built at Crewe, completed on 2 January 1951. She was the first British Railways standard locomotive to be built and the first of 55 locomotives of the Britannia class. The locomotive was named at a ceremony at Marylebone Station by the then Minister for Transport Alfred Barnes on 30 January 1951.

The BR Locomotive Naming Committee were determined not to use names already in use on other locomotives. They tried to observe this by not selecting the name Britannia for use on 70000 because it was already in use on one of the ex-LMS Jubilee Class locomotives, however Robert Riddles overruled them and the Jubilee had to be renamed. Britannia was initially based at Stratford (30A) in order to work East Anglian expresses to Norwich and Great Yarmouth, but was also particularly associated with the Hook Continental boat train to Harwich. Subsequently, the loco was based at Norwich Thorpe (w/e 31 January 1959) and March (June 1961) before spending the remainder of her career on the London Midland Region: Willesden (1A) (w/e 30 March 1963), Crewe North (5A) (w/e 25 May 1963), Crewe South (5B) (w/e 19 May 1965) and finally Newton Heath (9D) (w/e 5 March 1966) from where she was withdrawn w/e 28 May 1966. The locomotive pulled the funeral train of King George VI from King’s Lynn, Norfolk to London following his death in February 1952 at Sandringham House, Norfolk and Britannia had her cab roof painted white, as was the custom with royal locomotives. Britannia has also worn the white roof in preservation. Britannia was withdrawn in May 1966, after 15 years of service.

Initially destined for the National Railway Museum because of her cultural significance, she was stored. However, due to her prototype design and construction differences, the NRM chose standard sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell, instead. Britannia was eventually bought by Britannia Locomotive Company Ltd. She was eventually returned to steam on the Severn Valley Railway, where she remained between 1971 and 1980, in operational but non-mainline condition. With the society wishing to make more use of the locomotive, she was moved to the European gauge Nene Valley Railway in Peterborough, where she was also fitted with an air-brake compressor, and was based there from 1980-2000. Britannia made her return to the main line on 27 July 1991, successfully working enthusiast trips until 1997, and was featured in an episode of London’s Burning.

Due to the high cost of refurbishment, the locomotive was sold to Pete Waterman in 2000 with an expired mainline boiler certificate. She was Stored at Waterman’s workshops at the Crewe Heritage Centre, However the amount of work resulted in Waterman selling her to Jeremy Hosking. The locomotive underwent restoration at Crewe which involved a newly refurbished cab, a new smoke box and major work on the boiler; replacement steel sides, new crown stays, new front section barrel section, new steel and copper tubeplate, repairs and patches to door plate and major work to copper firebox.

BR standard class 2-6-4 70000 Britannia

In 2011 Britannia was Transferred to the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust (RSL&GT), and returned to main line operational condition in its prototype black British Railways livery (where it did not have nameplates fitted, as was thus known by railway convention as 70000). After a running-in period, in 2012 the locomotive was repainted in British Railways Brunswick Green, but with an early BR crest (unlike her sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell which carries BR’s Late Crest). On 24 January 2012, the loco hauled the Royal Train with Prince Charles on board to Wakefield Kirkgate, where he rededicated the locomotive. For the trip the loco again had a painted white cab roof, removed after the engine’s appearance at the West Somerset Railway’s Spring Gala. After extensive work to the locomotive over three years, the team of engineers at LNWR(H) completed the rebuilding of the locomotive and successfully returned her to steam at their Crewe Diesel Depot.

The final vistor for the 2018 Severn Valley Railway autumn Steam Gala is Ex LNER Q6 Class/NER T2 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive no. 3395, Ex BR 63395. It was originally theThe North Eastern Railway Class T2, but was reclassified as Class Q6 by the LNER. It is one of One-hundred-and-twenty which were originally built at Darlington Works and Armstrong Whitworth between 1913 and 1921 to the design of Vincent Raven, based on the NER Class T and T1 (LNER Q5). LNER Q6 3395 was built in 1918 And is normally on the North York Moors Railway. In addition the severn valley Railway is marking the centenary of GWR 28xx 2-8-0 Freight Locomotive no. 2857 Which was built 100 years ago in 1918. Thankfully the weather on Friday was also much better than Thursday.

GWR 2-8-0 no. 2857

Liam Gallagher

Liam Gallagher, former front man with English Rock Band Oasis was born 21st September 1972. Formed in Manchester in 1991, Oasis were Originally known as The Rain, the group was formed by Liam Gallagher (vocals & tambourine), Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs (guitar), Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan (bass guitar) and Tony McCarroll (drums, percussion), who were soon joined by Liam’s older brother Noel Gallagher (lead guitar and vocals). They have had eight UK number-one singles and eight UK number-one albums, and won fifteen NME Awards, nine Q Awards, four MTV Europe Music Awards and six Brit Awards, including one in 2007 for outstanding contribution to music and one for the best album of the last 30 years as voted by the BBC Radio 2 listeners; they have been nominated for three Grammy Awards. As of 2009, the band have sold an estimated 70 million records worldwide.

The band were listed in the Guinness Book of World Records in 2010 for “Longest Top 10 UK Chart Run by a Group” after an unprecedented run of 22 top 10 hits in the UK. The band also holds the Guinness World Record for being the most successful act in the UK between the years 1995 and 2005, spending 765 weeks in the Top 75 singles and albums charts.Its members were signed to independent record label Creation Records and afterwards released their record-setting debut albumDefinitely Maybe in 1994. The following year, the band recorded (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? (1995) with their new drummer Alan White in the midst of rivalry with Britpop peers Blur in the charts. The Gallagher brothers featured regularly in tabloid newspapers for their sibling disputes and wild lifestyles. In 1997, Oasis released their third album, Be Here Now, and although it became the fastest-selling album in UK chart history, the album’s popularity tapered off quickly. The band lost members Paul McGuigan and Paul Arthurs as they went on to record and release Standing on the Shoulder of Giants in 2000 and were replaced by Gem Archer and Andy Bell who joined the group for the tour in support of Giants. The band found renewed success and popularity starting with 2005′s Don’t Believe the Truth.

In August 2009, Noel Gallagher announced his departure from the band after a backstage altercation with Liam before a festival appearance The band, comprising the remaining members of Oasis and led by Liam Gallagher, decided to continue working together under the name Beady Eye, while Noel went on to form his solo project Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds.

In 2014 Beady Eye split up, however In 2015 Liam Gallagher appeared at an Irish pub in Charlestown, County Mayo playing a number of songs, including an early version of his new song ‘Bold’, in front of pub guests with an acoustic guitar. Gallagher also appeared solo at the Norwegian festival Bergenfest in 2017 And released his solo debut single “Wall of Glass” and Liam Gallagher performed his first solo concert at the Ritz in Manchester with all proceeds going to victims of the Manchester terror attack. Gallagher also made a surprise appearance at the One Love Manchester benefit concert where he played “Rock ‘N’ Roll Star”, “Wall of Glass” and “Live Forever” with Coldplay’s Chris Martin and Jonny Buckland. Gallagher also performed at the Rock am Ring festival in Germany, the Pinkpop festival in the Netherlands and the Glastonbury Festival, Singing “Don’t Look Back in Anger” and dedicating his performance to the victims of the Manchester and London terror attacks and the Grenfell Tower fire. He also released his second solo single “Chinatown” and performed at the Exit festival in Serbia, Benicassim festival in Spain and Lollapalooza festival in Chicago but left the stage in the middle of a song after performing for only 20 minutes. He later apologized on Twitter and claimed he had vocal problems. Gallagher later released the song “For What It’s Worth” which Gallagher described as an “apology” saying “…I’ve made a lot of mistakes…I guess it is an apology to whoever. I’ve pissed a lot of people off”. Liam Gallagher released his debut solo album “As You Were” in 2017.

Stephen King

American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction and fantasy Stephen Edwin King was born September 21, 1947 . His books have sold more than 350 million copies and have been adapted into a number of feature films, television movies and comic books. King has published 50 novels, including seven under the pen-name ofRichard Bachman, and five non-fiction books. He has written nearly two hundred short stories, most of which have been collected in nine collections of short fiction. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.King has received Bram Stoker Awards, World Fantasy Awards, British Fantasy SocietyAwards, his novella The Way Station was a Nebula Award novelette nominee, and his short story “The Man in the Black Suit” received the O. Henry Award. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his whole career, such as the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (2004), the Canadian Booksellers Association Lifetime Achievement Award 2007 and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (2007)

Some have suggested that king may have been psychologically inspired to write horror when, as a child, King apparently witnessed one of his friends being struck and killed by a train, after which King returned, speechless and seemingly in shock. Only later did the family learn of the friend’s death. King also compared his sudden inspiration for writing horror to his uncle’s successfully dowsing for water. He Was also inspired by an H. P. Lovecraft collection of short stories, entitled The Lurker in the Shadows, that had belonged to his father. The cover art featured an illustration of a yellow-green demon hiding within the recesses of a Hellish cavern beneath a tombstone.

King attended Durham Elementary School and graduated from Lisbon Falls High School, in Lisbon Falls, Maine. He displayed an early interest in horror as an avid reader of EC’s horror comics, including Tales from the Crypt. He began writing for fun while still in school, contributing articles to Dave’s Rag, the newspaper his brother published, and later began selling to his friends stories based on movies he had seen (though when discovered by his teachers, he was forced to return the profits). The first of his stories to be independently published was “I Was a Teenage Grave Robber”; it was serialized over four issues of a fanzine, Comics Review, in 1965. That story was published the following year in a revised form as “In a Half-World of Terror” in another fanzine, Stories of Suspense.

From 1966, King studied English at the University of Maine, graduating in 1970 with a Bachelor of Arts in English. That same year, his first daughter, Naomi Rachel, was born. He wrote a column for the student newspaper, The Maine Campus, titled “Steve King’s Garbage Truck”, took part in a writing workshop organized by Burton Hatlen, and took odd jobs to pay for his studies. He sold his first professional short story, “The Glass Floor”, to Startling Mystery Stories in 1967.After leaving the university, King earned a certificate to teach high school but, initially supplemented his wage by selling short stories to men’s magazines such as Cavalier. Many of which have been republished in the collection Night Shift. In 1971, King married Tabitha Spruce, whom he had met at the University’s Fogler Library after one of Professor Hatlen’s workshops. King was hired as a teacher at Hampden Academy in Hampden, Maine. He continued to contribute short stories to magazines and worked on ideas for novels.

In the 1970s, King began what became a series of interconnected stories about a lone gunslinger, Roland, who pursues the “Man in Black” in an alternate-reality universe that is a cross between J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth and the American Wild West as depicted by Clint Eastwood and Sergio Leone in their spaghetti Westerns. The first of these stories, The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger, was initially published in five installments by The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction from 1977 to 1981. The Gunslinger was continued as an eight-book epic series called The Dark Tower, which books King wrote and published infrequently over four decades ]In 1987, King released the second installment, The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three, in which Roland draws three people from 20th-century United States into his world through magical doors. A hardcover limited edition of the revised version of The Gunslinger along with a prequel story set in the Dark Tower world called “The Little Sisters of Eluria” was also published (which was originally published in 1998 in the collection Legends: Short Novels by the Masters of Modern Fantasy) in 2009.

In 2005, King signed a deal with Marvel Comics to publish a seven-issue limited series spin-off of the series called The Gunslinger Born. The series, which focuses on a young Roland Deschain, was plotted by Robin Furth, with dialogue by Peter David, and illustrated by Eisner Award-winning artist Jae Lee. The first issue was published on February 7, 2007, and King, David, Lee, and Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada appeared at a midnight signing at a Times Square, New York comic book store to promote it. The work had sold over 200,000 copies by March 2007. The success of The Gunslinger Born led to an ongoing miniseries published by Marvel, with Furth and David continuing to collaborate, featuring both adapted material from the Dark Tower books and new material approved by King; it also led to a second series of King adaptations in the same format, serializing the events of The Stand. In 2008, King published both a novel, Duma Key, and a collection, Just After Sunset. The latter featured 13 short stories, including a novella, N., which was later released as a serialized animated series And adopted into a limited comic book series.

In 2009, King published Ur, a novella written exclusively for the launch of the second-generation Amazon Kindle and available only on Amazon.com, and Throttle, a novella co-written with his son Joe Hill, and released later as an audiobook Road Rage, which included Richard Matheson’s short story “Duel”. On November 10 that year, King’s novel Under the Dome was published. It is a reworking of an unfinished novel he tried writing twice in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and at 1,074 pages, it is the largest novel he has written since 1986’s It. It debuted at No. 1 in The New York Times Bestseller List.

In 2010 King published a collection of four previously unpublished novellas called Full Dark, No Stars, an original novella called Blockade Billy, and A monthly comic book series called American Vampire, written by King with short-story writer Scott Snyder, and illustrated by Rafael Albuquerque. In it King wrote the background history of the very first American vampire, Skinner Sweet, and Scott Snyder wrote the story of Pearl. King’s next novel, 11/22/63, was published in, 2011, and was nominated for the 2012 World Fantasy Award Best Novel. The eighth Dark Tower volume, The Wind Through the Keyhole, was published in 2012. King’s next book Joyland, is about “an amusement-park serial killer”, and was, published In 2012, followed by the sequel to The Shining (1977), titled Doctor Sleep, published September 2013. His novel Under the Dome has also been adapted for television and A movie adaptation of The Dark Tower is also being released in 2017. A remake of IT has also been made. There is also a television series in the works based on the Dark Tower due to air 2018, of between 10 and 13 episodes, starring Idris Elba and Tom Taylor. The show’s central story, will take place many years before the events depicted in the film and focuses on Roland Deschain’s teenage years, as outlined in the series’ fourth book, Wizard and Glass.

Don Felder (The Eagles)

Best known for his work as lead guitarist for the Eagles from 1974 to 1980 and again from 1994 to 2001, the American musician and songwriter, Donald William “Don” Felder was born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida, and raised in a Southern Baptist family. Felder became interested in music after watching Elvis Presley live on The Ed Sullivan Show. He acquired his first guitar when he was about ten years old, which he has stated he exchanged with a friend at the five-and-dime for a handful of cherry bombs. A self-taught musician, he was heavily influenced by rock and roll. At the age of fifteen he started his first band, the Continentals. he met Bernie Leadon who later became one of the founding members of Eagles. Leadon replaced Stephen Stills in the Continentals, which eventually changed its name to the Maundy Quintet. Felder and Leadon both attended Gainesville High School. Felder gave guitar lessons at a local music shop for about 18 months, at which time Felder also learned how to play slide guitar from Duane Allman. The Maundy Quintet recorded and released a 45 rpm single on the Tampa-based Paris Tower label in 1967, which received airplay in north-central Florida.

After the Maundy Quintet broke up, Felder went to Manhattan, New York City, with a band called Flow, which released a self-titled improvisational rock fusion album in 1970. The 1970 Flow album has the distinction of being among the very first issued on the newly independent CTI Records label, founded by noted jazz producer Creed Taylor. In New York, Felder improved his mastery of improvisation on the guitar and learned various styles. After Flow broke up, Felder moved to Boston where he got a job in a recording studio. In 1973, Felder moved to Los Angeles where he was hired as guitar player for a tour by David Blue, replacing David Lindley who was touring with Crosby & Nash. He helped Blue put together a tour, during which they opened at a few Crosby and Nash shows in November 1973 and for Neil Young at the opening of the Roxy Theatre. Once again, Felder replaced Lindley, this time in Crosby & Nash’s band when Lindley fell ill. He would also jam from time to time with Eagles in their rehearsal space.

In 1974, he featured on the Michael Dinner album The Great Pretender and was then asked by American Rock band The Eagles to add slide guitar to their song “Good Day in Hell” and some guitar licks to “Already Gone”. Shortly afterwards, he was invited to join the band. The Eagles were formed in Los Angeles, California in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner. With seven number-one singles, six Grammys, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful bands of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the U.S.according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone’s list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”, and the band was ranked No. 75 on the magazine’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. They are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold over 150 million records—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and highest-selling American band in US history. No American band sold more records than the Eagles during the 1970s.The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three Top 40 singles: “Take It Easy”, “Witchy Woman”, and “Peaceful Easy Feeling”.

Their next album, Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, reaching only No. 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the Top 40. However, the album contained two of the band’s most popular tracks: “Desperado” and “Tequila Sunrise”. They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two Top 40 singles: “Already Gone” and their first Number One, “Best of My Love”.It was not until 1975’s One of These Nights that the Eagles became arguably America’s biggest band. The album included three Top 5 singles: “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, and “Take It to the Limit”, the first of which hitting the top of the charts. They continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell over 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and over 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, “New Kid in Town” and “Hotel California”.

In 1979 they released their last studio album for nearly 28 years “The Long Run”, which spawned three Top 10 singles: “Heartache Tonight”, “The Long Run”, and “I Can’t Tell You Why”, the lead single being another chart-topping hit. The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for the album Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured intermittently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years. The album would top the album charts, release five singles to the Adult Contemporary Charts, and win the band two Grammys. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. The band members have discussed the possibility of making another album. On April 1, 2013, during a concert at Casino Rama in Rama, Ontario, Don Henley announced a tour in support of the band’s documentary release, History of the Eagles.

Following the 1980 breakup of the Eagles, Felder focused more on his family but also embarked on a solo career, concentrating on film composition and session work. He worked on The Bee Gees’ 1981 album Living Eyes as a session guitarist. Through his association with Bee Gees’ producer Albhy Galuten, Felder also made session appearances on albums by artists as diverse as Diana Ross, Barbra Streisand and Andy Gibb. During this time, he also contributed guitar work to Stevie Nicks’ first two solo albums.Among his musical film credits in the 1980s are two songs on the soundtrack to the 1981 animated cult film Heavy Metal entitled “Heavy Metal (Takin’ a Ride)” (with former bandmates Don Henley and Timothy B. Schmit contributing backing vocals) and “All of You” – with Jefferson Starship’s Mickey Thomas as backing vocalist, as well as the title track “Wild Life” from the 1985 motion picture adaptation of Neil Simon’s “The Sluggers Wife.” He also penned the song “She’s Got A Part Of Me” from the soundtrack to the 1985 romantic comedy Secret Admirer. Felder’s television credits include FTV, a musical comedy show which he hosted from 1985–1986, and Galaxy High, the 1986 CBS cartoon series for which he scored and performed all of the music, including the series’ catchy theme song.

In 1983, Felder released his first solo album entitled Airborne. The album’s single “Never Surrender,” co-written with Kenny Loggins, was a minor hit, having also appeared on the soundtrack to the popular motion picture teen comedy Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Nearly three decades later, on October 9, 2012, his second solo album Road to Forever was released, with “Fall from the Grace of Love” chosen as the lead single.Throughout his career, Felder is best known for his iconic live performances using the Gibson Les Paul and Gibson EDS-1275 electric guitars. This prompted the Gibson Guitar Corporation to honor him in 2010 with two signature re-issues, the “Don Felder Hotel California 1959 Les Paul” and the “Don Felder Hotel California EDS-1275.” Felder himself is an avid guitar collector, having amassed close to 300 models since childhood. He almost sold his 1953/1954 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top at Manny’s Music Shop while living in New York in 1970, but the offer was too low. Felder estimates that the guitar was worth between $3,000 to $4,000 at the time, and Manny’s offered him between $150 and $300. To this day he has never sold any guitar he has owned.Felder currently tours with his own band. Heavy metal (taking a ride) is also featured in the South Park episode “Major Boobage”

H. G. Wells

English science-fiction author, Herbert George “H. G.” Wells was born 21st September 1866 in Bromley, Kent. He is best known for his work in the science fiction genre but also wrote contemporary novels about, history, politics and social commentary, as well as textbooks and rules for war games. Together with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback, Wells has been referred to as “The Father of Science Fiction”. His most notable science fiction works include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau & his earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context.

Wells became interested in literature after an accident in 1874 left Him with a broken leg. To pass the time he started reading books from the local library, brought to him by his father. He soon became devoted to the other worlds and lives to which books gave him access; they also stimulated his desire to write. In 1874 he entered Thomas Morley’s Commercial Academy, until 1880. From 1880 to 1883, Wells had an apprenticeship as a draper at the Southsea Drapery Emporium. This later inspired the novels The Wheels of Chance and Kipps, which portray the life of a draper’s apprentice as well as providing a critique of society’s distribution of wealth. In October 1879 Wells joined the National School at Wookey in Somerset as a pupil-teacher. After a short apprenticeship at a chemist in nearby Midhurst, and an even shorter stay as a boarder at Midhurst Grammar School, Who offered him the opportunity to become a pupil-teacher, where his proficiency in Latin and science enabled him to continue his self-education in earnest. In 1880 Wells won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science (later the Royal College of Science in South Kensington, now part of Imperial College London) in London,

Studying biology under Thomas Henry Huxley (Who was an English biologist known as “Darwin’s Bulldog” for his advocacy of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution) and also entered the Debating Society of the school. Whilst at the Imperial College he read The Republic by Plato, whose ideas interested him. He also turned to contemporary ideas of socialism as expressed by the recently formed Fabian Society and free lectures delivered at Kelmscott House, the home of William Morris. He also helped establish the Science School Journal, which allowed him to express his views on literature and society, as well as trying his hand at fiction: the first version of his novel The Time Machine was published in the journal under the title, The Chronic Argonauts. Wells also entered the College of Preceptors (College of Teachers). He later received his Licentiate and Fellowship FCP diplomas from the College. Wells earned a Bachelor of Science degree in zoology from the University of London External Programme, In 1889–90 he managed to find a post as a teacher at Henley House School where he taught A. A. Milne.

Wells’s first non-fiction bestseller was Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought. Some of his early novels, invented a number of themes now classic in science fiction in such works as The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, When the Sleeper Wakes, and The First Men in the Moon, and wrote dozens of short stories and novellas, the best known of which is “The Country of the Blind” (1904) ands some of these also inspired Science Fiction Television- His short story “The New Accelerator” was also the inspiration for the Star Trek episode Wink of an Eye. Wells also wrote non fiction novels which received critical acclaim, including Kipps, Tono-Bungay, The Outline of History, A Short History of the World, The Science of Life and The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind and wrote a number of Utopian novels including A Modern Utopia, which usually begin with the rushing to catastrophe, until a solution is found – such as abandoning war (In the Days of the Comet) or having a world council of scientists taking over, as in The Shape of Things to Come, which was later adapted for the 1936 Alexander Korda film, Things to Come. Wells also contemplated the ideas of nature versus nurture and questions humanity in books such as The Island of Doctor Moreau, where a person discovers an island of animals being vivisected unsuccessfully into human beings, and tries to escape,

In 1936, Wells called for the compilation of a constantly growing and changing World Encyclopaedia, to be reviewed by outstanding authorities and made accessible to every human being. In 1938, he published a collection of essays on the future organisation of knowledge and education, World Brain, including the essay, “The Idea of a Permanent World Encyclopaedia”. Seeking a more structured way to play war games, Wells also wrote Floor Games followed by Little Wars which is recognised today as the first recreational wargame and Wells is regarded by gamers and hobbyists as “the Father of Miniature War Gaming”.

He was also an outspoken socialist, often sympathising with pacifist views and becoming increasingly political and often wrote about the ills of Society leading him to be touted as a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and wrote abundantly about the “New Woman” and the Suffragettes. His most consistent political ideal was the World State, which he considered inevitable. He envisioned the state to be a planned society that would advance science, end nationalism, and allow people to progress by merit rather than birth, Wells also believed in the theory of eugenics and Some contemporary supporters even suggested connections between the degenerate man-creatures portrayed in The Time Machine and Wells’s eugenic beliefs. Wells also brought his interest in Art & Design and politics together which led to the foundation of the Design and Industries Association. In his last book Mind at the End of its Tether he considered the idea that humanity being replaced by another species might not be a bad idea. He also came to call the era “The Age of Frustration”.

During his final years he became particularly outspoken in his criticism of the Catholic Church, he was also a diabetic, and in 1934 co-founded what is now Diabetes UK, the leading charity for people living with diabetes in the UK. On 28 October 1940 Wells was interviewed by Orson Welles, who two years previously had performed an infamous radio adaptation of The War of the Worlds, on KTSA radio in San Antonio, Texas. In the interview, Wells admitted his surprise at the widespread panic that resulted from the broadcast, but acknowledged his debt to Orson Welles for increasing sales of one of his “more obscure” titles. In his preface to the 1941 edition of The War in the Air, Wells had stated that his epitaph should be: “I told you so. You damned fools”. H.G. Wells sadly passed away on 13 August 1946 in London, aged 79 and was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium on 16 August 1946, his ashes scattered at sea. A commemorative blue plaque in his honour was installed at his home in Regent’s Park. His Science fiction novels remain popular and have been adapted for screen and television numerous times.

Nuno Bettencourt

Portuguese-born American guitarist, singer-songwriter, and record producer Nuno Duarte Gil Mendes Bettencourt was born September 20, 1966 in Praia da Vitória, Terceira, Azores, Portugal. When he was four years old, his family, including brothers Luís and Roberto, moved to Hudson, Massachusetts. Bettencourt lived on Main Street in Hudson for twenty-one years. Initially, Bettencourt had little interest in music, preferring to spend his time playing hockey and soccer. His first instrument was the drums and he played them exclusively until his brother, Luís, started teaching him the guitar.

While Bettencourt was slow to adopt the instrument under his brother’s tutelage, his skills quickly developed when he began teaching himself, In his sophomore and junior years of high school, Bettencourt dropped out of sports and High School to focus on playing guitar. Bettencourt’s musical influences include Eddie Van Halen. The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Prince, Queen, Pat Travers, Paco de Lucía, Al Di Meola and Kayak. Bettencourt rose to international prominence as a guitar player after he joined Extreme in 1985. the band released its debut record, Extreme, in 1989. He then provided rhythm guitar on the single version of Janet Jackson’s “Black Cat,”

In 1990, Extreme released their most critically acclaimed album, Pornograffitti, which included the hits “More Than Words” and “Hole Hearted”. The album also has one of the most impressive guitar solos to date, The “Flight of the Wounded Bumblebee” an interpretation of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee”, which is the intro guitar solo to the Track “He-Man Woman Hater”. The band followed up with III Sides to Every Story in 1992. Bettencourt composed and arranged the brass and string sections for this album and the full orchestra on the album. In 1995, Extreme released the album, Waiting for the Punchline, but the band broke up in 1996 when Bettencourt expressed his desire to follow a solo career. Shortly after, singer Gary Cherone went on to become the lead singer of Van Halen.

In 2007, the band reformed with the original line up (with the exception of Paul Geary) to begin work on a new album, Saudades de Rock, released on August 12, 2008, and subsequent tour. In 1997, Bettencourt released his first solo effort, Schizophonic, which he had been working on for five years. The album was well-received critically, but was not a commercial success. On December 16, 1997, Bettencourt’s new band – Mourning Widows (whose name was inspired by a writing he had seen on a church wall back in Portugal), released their self-titled debut album in Japan on Polydor Records. It sold 45,000 in the first month. The band featured Roberto Carlos’ son Donovan Bettencourt on bass and New York drummer Jeff Consi. In 2000, Mourning Widow’s follow-up, Furnished Souls for Rent originally released in Japan, and then in the U.S.

2008, Bettencourt was featured on the soundtrack for the motion picture Smart People. Bettencourt is credited on the cover on the soundtrack as well. The soundtrack also features the Gary Cherone track, “Need I Say More”, and Baby Animals selections. The album was released by Hollywood Records and is available on iTunes. The following year, Bettencourt was featured in a song and video called “Best Night Ever”. by Marshall Eriksen, a character on How I Met Your Mother The video was a parody of Extreme’s “More Than Words” video, featuring the entire main cast of How I Met Your Mother.

Bettencourt formed Population 1 and released Population 1, (which featured him playing all instruments on most tracks), Bettencourt assembled a band with Joe Pessia on bass, Steve Ferlazzo on keyboards and back-up vocals, and Kevin Figueiredo on drums and back-up vocals. Steve Ferlazzo was also featured in Cherone’s next band carnation effort after Van Halen’s breakup (Along with Pat Badger and Mike Mangini from Extreme) Tribe of Judah.In 2004, Population 1 released Sessions from Room Four in 2005 and the band was renamed to Near Death Experience, then again, renamed to DramaGods. DramaGods released their first album in December 2005. DramaGods are currently seeking a record deal for release of their first album under the new name in the U.S. After an explosive debut on the increasingly popular The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, the band (still called ‘Population 1′ at that point), later appeared on the social networking website MySpace, featuring videos and songs from the aforementioned Dramagods album, entitled Love. Bettencourt decided to make the album available through iTunes before procuring an American record deal. Bettencourt frequently toured with DramaGods in Japan where they appeared at the Udo Music Festival along with KISS, Santana, Jeff Beck, The Doobie Brothers, Alice in Chains, The Pretenders, Ben Folds Five, and others in July 2006 shortly after Bettencourt took part in a three date reunion tour with Extreme in New England.

Bettencourt’s playing has been featured at 2004 on the Universal/Japan CD and DVD release of Guitar Wars featuring solo and collective performances of Bettencourt with many others, including Steve Hackett (Genesis, GTR), Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones and Mr. Big/Racer X guitarist Paul Gilbert. The Satellite Party is Jane’s Addiction frontman Perry Farrell’s new project which featured Bettencourt as lead guitarist (Nuno left the band in July 2007, citing disagreements about the direction of the live show), along with DramaGods drummer Kevin Figueiredo, bassist Carl Restivo (who also played with Extreme in the Azores in 2004), and Etty Farrell on backing vocals. An earlier lineup of the band with Perry Farrell, Etty Farrell, Nuno, Kevin Figueiredo, and Steve Ferlazo (Dramagods) on keyboards performed at the 2005 Lollapalooza festival. In 2007 Bettencourt helped produce Ultra Payloaded, the debut album by Satellite Party Who performed alongside Pearl Jam, Kings of Leon and Incubus in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. In late July 2007. The latest CD from magician Criss Angel contains a song on which Bettencourt appears and was released in June 2006. Sully Erna, Vince Neil, Shannon Larkin and Bettencourt join Angel in the video for the track “MF 2”. In 1990, Bettencourt played rhythm guitar on the single version of Janet Jackson’s “Black Cat”.In 1993, Bettencourt co-wrote and produced “Where Are You Going” for the Super Mario Bros. movie. He also joined Robert Palmer in the studio to record Palmer’s album Honey. Bettencourt co-wrote Tantric’s hit single “Hey Now”), Hollywood recording group BB Mak, Toni Braxton, and numerous others. Bettencourt has also collaborated with singer Suze DeMarchi and with all of her Baby Animals bandmates. On Baby Animals’ second release, Shaved and Dangerous. He also co-wrote “Because I Can”. Baby Animals also appeared on Bettencourt’s 1997 solo album Schizophonic. In 1991, Bettencourt produced Dweezil Zappa’s album Confessions.

Bettencourt also sings lead vocals for the first time on a semi-ballad entitled “The Kiss”, and plays guitar and sings background vocal on other tracks alongside Extreme members Gary Cherone and Pat Badger. In 1999, Bettencourt produced and contributed vocals for Portuguese singer and actress Lúcia Moniz’ album Magnolia. In 2006, Bettencourt along with his band DramaGods contributed their song “S’OK” to the album project Artists for Charity – Guitarists 4 the Kids, for World Vision Canada, an organisation which helps underprivileged kids in need.In November 2009, Bettencourt toured with Rihanna on her Last Girl on Earth Tour as lead guitarist and has since performed on her Loud (2010), 777 (2012) and Diamonds World (2013) tours, respectively. In July 2011, Steel Panther and Nuno collaborated on the track “It Won’t Suck Itself”, which also featured Nickelback frontman Chad Kroeger and during 2016 Bettencourt was also one of five guitarists featured on the Generation Axe tour.

David Hemingway (Beautiful South, Housemartins)

English musician and songwriter Dave Hemingway was born 20 September 1960, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England). He was a lead vocalist for the Hull-based band The Beautiful South until they disbanded in 2007. Previously, he had been a member of The Housemartins .Hemingway is the son of a lorry driver and local comedian on the club circuit, Harry Hemingway and Flo Hemingway who worked in a bar called The Kingfisher. In Hull’s Henry Cooper School, Hemingway was in the same class as The Housemartins’ future drummer,Hugh Whitaker. The two shared an interest in drumming, and one day, when the class were asked who would like to learn drums, they put their hands up first. Hemingway followed Whitaker into bands, first the Newpolitans with Dave Rotheray on bass, and then the Velvetones. Whilst at university in London Dave was drummer and a founding member of The Shoppers. It became a well regarded post-punk band (Steve Brain guitar/ lead vocals Maxine Tarte keyboards/ vocals Gavin Hearne lead guitar/vocals Christos Yanni bass/ vocals). Dave’s drumming skills can be heard on their first demo.

His break came when he got a call from Rotheray telling him Whitaker had left The Housemartins. Rotheray recommended him to Housemartins guitarist Stan Cullimore, who phoned him. He was working as a purchase ledger clerk at the time for the Crystal Motor Group. Hemingway quit his job on 6 March 1987, and soon found himself in the recording studio, recording the band’s second album,The People Who Grinned Themselves to Death.After the Housemartins disbanded, he and Housemartins founder Paul Heaton put together the Beautiful South from its ashes, featuringroadie and bassist Sean Welch.Hemingway’s first solo album, Hello Cruel World, was released as a download only on iTunes. The album’s title was inspired by Hemingway’s experience recording in the capital.After reforming “The South” in 2012, Hemingway along with Alison Wheeler, Gaz Burtles and more from the original Beautiful South lineup released their first album since 2006 entitled “Sweet Refrains”.

The Housemartins were an English Alternative rock band that was active in the 1980s. Many of the Housemartins’ lyrics were a mixture of Marxist politics and Christianity, reflecting singer Paul Heaton’s beliefs at the time (the back cover of London 0 Hull 4contained the message, “Take Jesus – Take Marx – Take Hope”). The Beautiful South was an English pop/rock group formed at the end of the 1980s by two former members of Hull group The Housemartins, Paul Heaton and Dave Hemingway. Other members were Sean Welch (bass), Dave Stead (drums) and Dave Rotheray (guitar) and a succession of female vocalists – Briana Corrigan, Jacqui Abbott and Alison Wheeler.The group broke up in January 2007, claiming the split was due to “musical similarities” having sold around 15 million records worldwide. In January 2009, it was announced that the former members Dave Hemingway, Alison Wheeler, and Dave Stead would reform under the name “New Beautiful South” which was later changed to “The South”

The band was formed in late 1983 by Paul Heaton (vocals) and Stan Cullimore (guitar) and they initially performed as a busking duo. Note that throughout his tenure with the band, Heaton idiosyncratically billed himself as “P.d. Heaton”.The Heaton/Cullimore duo recorded a demo tape with Ingo Dewsnap of Les Zeiga Fleurs, which brought them to the attention of Go Discs. They then expanded by recruiting Ted Key (bass), former guitarist with The Gargoyles, and Justin Patrick [drummer on loan from Udomsuksa!] who was then replaced by Chris Lang. Their first live performance as a band was at Hull University in October 1984. The band’s membership changed considerably over the years. Key left at the end of 1985 and was replaced by Norman Cook (the futureFatboy Slim). Drummer Chris Lang was replaced by Hugh Whitaker, former drummer with The Gargoyles, who in turn was replaced with Dave Hemingway.The band often referred to themselves as “the fourth best band in Hull”, referring to Hull, their home base. The three bands that were “better” were Red Guitars, Everything but the Girl and The Gargoyles.

In 1986, having recorded two John Peel sessions, the band broke through with the single “Happy Hour”, which reached No. 3 in the UK Singles Chart. The single’s success was helped by a claymation animated pop promo of a type that was in vogue at the time, featuring a cameo by television comedian Phill Jupitus, who toured with the band under his stage name of ‘Porky the Poet’.At the end of 1986 they had their only UK No. 1 single on 16 December with a cover version of Isley-Jasper-Isley’s “Caravan of Love”. It was knocked off the top spot by Jackie Wilson’s “Reet Petite” on 23 December, denying the Housemartins the coveted Christmas No. 1 single.The a cappella style of “Caravan of Love” was not to the taste of all Housemartins’ fans, although a cappella material had always been part of the band’s repertoire. “Caravan of Love” was first performed by the band in their second Peel session in April 1986, prior to their initial chart success. At Peel’s suggestion, the band then recorded another session (under the name The Fish City Five), consisting entirely of a cappella performances, and on at least one occasion (at The Tower nightclub in Hull, the same concert at which they were filmed as the Housemartins for the BBC programme Rock Around the Clock) played support act for their own performance under this alternative name. The “Caravan of Love” single featured four a cappella gospel songs on the B-side. The band split in 1988, but the members have remained friends and have worked on each other’s projects. Norman Cook has enjoyed significant success with Beats International and then as Fatboy Slim, while Heaton, Hemingway and roadie Sean Welch formed The Beautiful South.In August 2009, Mojo magazine arranged for The Housemartins’ original members to get together for a photo-shoot and interview, for the first time in many years, but in the interview all the members maintained that the band would not re-form.In December 2009, Cullimore co-wrote songs for (and appeared in) a pre-school music series called The Bopps, which first showed on Nick Jr. in the UK in April 2010.