INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY IS CELEBRATED ANNUALLY ON 22 OCTOBER. INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY was founded 2000, when Derek Arnold of Iowa as a parody. after he decided that he, like so many other internet users, had simply had enough of people using all caps to emphasize themselves on the web. So he created INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY to poke fun at those individuals who unnecessarily capitalize letters, words, and phrases and bring some sanity back to the web.The day became so popular with internet users that INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY is now celebrated twice a year on June 28 and on October 22. The second observation on June 28 was added by Arnold in memory of American pitchman Billy Mays.

Caps Lock is a button on a computer keyboard that causes all letters of Latin-based scripts to be generated in capitals. It is a toggle key: each press reverses its action. Some keyboards also implement a light, so as to give visual feedback about whether it is on or off. Exactly what Caps Lock does depends on the keyboard hardware, the operating system, the device driver, and the keyboard layout. Usually, the effect is limited to letter keys; letters of Latin-based scripts are capitalised, while letters of other scripts (e.g. Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi) and non-letter characters are generated normally.

The Caps Lock key originated as a Shift lock key on mechanical typewriters. An early innovation in typewriters was the introduction of a second character on each typebar, thereby doubling the number of characters that could be typed, using the same number of keys. The second character was positioned above the first on the face of each typebar, and the typewriter’s Shift key caused the entire type apparatus to move, physically shifting the positioning of the typebars relative to the ink ribbon. Just as in modern computer keyboards, the shifted position was used to produce capitals and secondary characters.

The Shift lock key was introduced so the shift operation could be maintained indefinitely without continuous effort. It mechanically locked the typebars in the shifted position, causing the upper character to be typed upon pressing any key. Because the two shift keys on a typewriter required more force to operate and were meant to be pressed by the little finger, it could be difficult to hold the shift down for more than two or three consecutive strokes, therefore the introduction of the Shift lock key was also meant to reduce finger muscle pain caused by repetitive typing.

Mechanical typewriter shift lock is typically set by pushing both Shift and lock at the same time, and released by pressing Shift by itself. Computer Caps Lock is set and released by the same key, and the Caps Lock behavior in most QWERTY keyboard layouts differs from the Shift lock behavior in that it capitalizes letters but does not affect other keys, such as numbers or punctuation. Some early computer keyboards, such as the Commodore 64, had a Shift lock but no Caps Lock; others, such as the BBC Micro, had both, only one of which could be enabled at a time.

Typical Caps Lock behavior is that pressing the key sets an input mode in which all typed letters are uppercase, if applicable. The keyboard remains in Caps Lock mode and would generate all caps text until the key is pressed again. Keyboards often include a small LED to indicate that Caps Lock is active, either on the key itself or in a dedicated indicators area, where Scroll lock and Num lock indicators are also located. On the original IBM PC keyboard, this LED was exclusively controlled by the keyboard. Since the introduction of IBM AT, however, it is under control of the operating system. Small keyboards, such as netbook keyboards, forgo the indicators to conserve space, instead providing software that gives an on-screen or audio feedback.

In most cases, the status of the Caps Lock key only changes the meaning of the alphabet keys, not that of any other key. Microsoft Windows enforces this behavior only when a keyboard layout for a Latin-based script is active, e.g. the “English (United States)” layout but not the “Persian” layout. However, on certain non-QWERTY keyboard layouts, such as the French AZERTY and the German QWERTZ, Caps Lock still behaves like a traditional Shift lock, i.e., the keyboard behaves as if the Shift key is held down, causing the keyboard to input the alternative values of the keys; example the “5” key generates a “%” when Caps lock is pressed.

Depending on the keyboard layout used, the Shift key, when pressed in combination with a Latin-based letter button while Caps Lock is already on, is either ignored,[example needed] or nullifies the effect of Caps Lock, so that typed characters are in lowercase again. Microsoft Windows enforces the latter. While the typical locking behavior on keyboards with Caps Lock key is that of a toggle, each press reversing the shift state, some keyboard layouts implement a combi mode, where pressing a Shift key in Caps Lock mode will also release the Caps Lock mode, just as it typically happens in Shift lock mode. Some keyboard drivers include a configuration option to deactivate the Caps Lock key. This behavior allows users to decide themselves whether they want to use the key, or to disable it to prevent accidental activation.

However There are some protocols that make it appropriate to post in all Caps, such as when posting as part of a weather monitoring network. In this rare and perhaps singular case, all caps are how you indicate that something is in fact of importance, and with its collection of acronyms and shorthand makes sure its clear. However overuse of CAPS LOCK

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