International Day for the Abolition of Slavery

The International Day for the Abolition of Slavery occurs annually on December 2, organized by the United Nations General Assembly. The Day was first celebrated in 1986. The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others was approved by the United Nations General Assembly on December 2, 1949. Besides, by resolution 57/195 of 18 December 2002, the Assembly proclaimed 2004 the International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition.

The United Nations (UN) are committed to fighting slavery and using International Day for the Abolition of Slavery to raise awareness on the subject. Living in a modern society, it’s disturbing to think that slavery is still happening in other parts of our world. So what are the reasons to abolish slavery? No one should be treated unfairly to suit the advantages of others but slavery and capitalism go hand in hand. Forced labour, awful forms of child labour, and human trafficking often take place in poorer parts of the world. It seems a million miles away from where we are, but one million kids a year are pushed into acting as slaves, many for sexual exploitation.

Tho raise awareness concerning the International Day for the Abolition of SLavery, The United Nations plus The online and print media promote the day through news, debates and forums. Flyers and newsletters are put up in public places like universities, where students will learn about the negative impact of slavery on people and society. online forums can also be used to promote the occasion. Writing short stories, articles, Plays or even poetry on human trafficking can also help people understand the seriousness of thd issue.

The horrors of slavery are well illustrated by the plight of three, women Who allegedly lived in the fearful, dark shadows and were, according to police, the victims of terrible psychological and physical abuse; effectively kept as slaves and held against their will as members of an extremist, political cult led by Aravindan Balakrishnan – a disciple of Chairman Mao, the late Chinese communist leader, and known as Comrade Bala to his devotees – Who ran a community so secret that nobody realised that three women, apparently free to come and go at will, were apparently shackled in all that time to their mercurial leader by “invisible handcuffs”. Josephine Herivel, now aged 57, was one of those women. She was a brilliant young violinist, whose eminent father had been instrumental in breaking the Nazi’s Enigma wartime code at Bletchley Park.But Miss Herivel became cut off from her family in the mid-1970s some time after arriving in London from her native Belfast, where her father was a lecturer at Queen’s University. By the time he died, two years ago, she had been left out of the family will while his obituaries made mention of just two daughters, not three.

Another Woman Aishah Wahab, 69, also had a glittering career ahead. She had come to London from her native Malaysia as long ago as 1967 after winning a scholarship to study in London. She, too, apparently fell under Comrade Bala’s spell and rapidly lost touch with her family.The third woman apparently rescued by police and anti-slavery charity workers is Rosie Davies. She is 30, half the age of the other two. It is not clear who her father is but she spent her life under the spell of the Maoist cult. Her mother, Sian Davies, had been educated first at Cheltenham Ladies College before obtaining a law degree. Sian was a postgraduate student at the LSE when she, too, first encountered Comrade Bala.When Rosie was just 14, her mother died in mysterious circumstances, as the result of a fall from a second floor bathroom window on Christmas Eve 1996. She was living at one of the commune’s houses, owned by the local council, in Herne Hill, south London.For seven months, Sian Davies lay in a coma at a London hospital. Yet when her family inquired as to her whereabouts, they were told Sian had gone travelling in to India but that she sent her love. When she died of her injuries, the authorities never bothered to inquire about her daughter, Rosie, left behind. Comrade Bala appears to be the charismatic force that kept the commune together, long after the revolutionary fervour of the 1960s and 1970s had died away. Finally When he was aged 73, he was arrested and subsequently bailed on suspicion of being involved in forced labour and slavery.

More events and holidays taking place on December 2

  • Business of Popping Corn Day
  • National Fritters Day
  • National Mutt Day
  • Play Basketball Day
  • Safety Razor Day

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