Holidays and Events occurring on 4 December

NATIONAL DICE DAY

National Dice Day is celebrated annually on the 4 December. Dice are popular throughout the world and The oldest known set of Dice originate as a part of the Royal Game of Ur, which is the oldest existing board game and is approximately 4,400 years old. Ancient dice were not terribly different from modern forms and the concept of a six-faced cube with dots has been the world’s most popular pastime and gambling tool.

In the Mahabharata, the character of Yudhisthira gambles away his kingdom, his brothers, and his wife. The epic Kurukshetra war that follows a simple game of dice makes up the rest of the narrative.. While it’s difficult to pinpoint the date that Mahabharata was written, the most commonly held belief in India is that the events described in it happened about 5,000 years ago. Judging from the fact that Sanskrit epics mention them and that they’ve shown up on various archaeological sites, they’ve been around practically as long as civilisation itself.

Tetrahedral dice and other shapes have also been around for quite awhile. Materials like ceramic, various metals, wood, and stone were used to create die. Brass dice have been around forever in Tamil Nadu and soldiers during the American War of Independence used to hammer them out of lead musket balls.

Dice were also made from the talus (ankle bone) of hoofed animals. The ancient Roman’s played a game called knucklebones which used the talus of a hooofed animal as a Dice. Ivory, wood and plastics are other materials used in making dice and they also come in many shapes and colors. Regardless of what shape they come in, the most popular up until the 20th century was bone. These days, most dice are cast from plastic or synthetic resin. Particularly, the ones used in casinos are designed to ensure that they are truly random. However dice are not just used in gambling, they’re also an essential part of many board games such as backgammon and Monopoly.


  • Santa’s List Day
  • Extraordinary Work Team Recognition Day
  • National Cookie Day
  • National Kitten Day
  • Wear Brown Shoes Day

KNUCKLEBONES

The origin of knucklebones is closely connected with that of dice, of which knucklebones is probably a more primitive form. Sophocles, in a written fragment of one of his works, ascribed the invention of knucklebones to the mythical figure Palamedes, who taught it to his Greek countrymen during the Trojan War. Both the Iliad and the Odyssey contain allusions to games similar in character to knucklebones. Pausanius in his Description of Greece (2.20.3) tells of a temple of Fortune in Corinth in which Palamedes made an offering of his newly invented game. Children’s games were a common temple offering at some temples.

When the Greek God Zeus, saw that Ganymede longed for his playmates upon Mount Ida, he gave him Eros for a companion and golden dibs with which to play. He even joined in the game (Apollonius). It is significant, however, that both Herodotus and Plato ascribe a foreign origin to the game. Plato, in Phaedrus, names the Egyptian god Thoth as its inventor, while Herodotus relates that the Lydians, during a period of famine in the days of King Atys, originated this game and indeed almost all other games, except draughts.

There were two methods of playing in ancient times. The first, and probably the primitive method, consisted in tossing up and catching the bones on the back of the hand, very much as the game is played today. In ancient Rome, it was called tali (knucklebones): a painting excavated from Pompeii, currently housed in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, depicts the goddesses Latona, Niobe, Phoebe, Aglaia and Hileaera, with the last two being engaged in playing a game of knucklebones. According to an epigram of Asclepiodotus, astragali were given as prizes to schoolchildren. This simple form of the game was generally only played by women and children, and was called penta litha or five-stones. There were several varieties of this game besides the usual toss and catch; one being called tropa, or hole-game, the object of which was to toss the bones into a hole in the earth. Another was the simple game of odd or even. The second, probably derivative, form of the game was one of pure chance, the stones being thrown upon a table, either from the hand or from a cup, and the values of the sides upon which they fell were counted. The shape of the pastern bones used for astragaloi as well as for the tali of the Romans, with whom knucklebones was also popular, determined the manner of counting.

The pastern bone of a sheep, goat, or calf has two rounded ends upon which it cannot stand and two broad and two narrow sides, one of each pair being concave and one convex. The convex narrow side, called chios or “the dog”, was counted as 1, the convex broad side as 3, the concave broad side as 4, and the concave narrow side as 6. Four astragali were used and 35 different scores were possible in a single throw. Many of these throws received distinctive names such as: Aphrodite, Midas, Solon, and Alexander. Among the Romans, some of the names were: Venus, King, and Vulture. The highest throw in Greece counted 40, and was called the Euripides. It was probably a combination throw, since more than four sixes could not be thrown at a single time. The lowest throw, both in Greece and Rome, was the Dog.

The modern game may use a rubber ball, and the knucklebones (jacks), typically a set of ten, are made of metal or plastic. There are variants of how the players decide who goes first: it is usually through “flipping,” (the set of jacks is placed in cupped hands, flipped to the back of the hands, and then back to cupped hands again; the player who keeps the most from falling goes first), To set up the game, the jacks are scattered loosely into the play area. The players in turn bounce the ball off the ground, pick up jacks, and then catch the ball before it bounces for a second time.

The number of jacks to be picked up is pre-ordained and sequential; at first you must pick up one, next two and so on, depending on the total number of jacks included. The number may not divide evenly, and there may be jacks left over. If the player chooses to pick up the leftover jacks first, one variation is to announce this by saying “horse before carriage” or “queens before kings.” The playing area should be decided between the players since there is no official game rule regarding that. The winning player is the one to pick up the largest number of jacks, and the game can be made more challenging by playing with fifteen or twenty jacks (two sets). Regardless of the total number of jacks in play, the player who gets to the highest game wins. Game one is usually single bounce and game two is chosen by whoever progresses from game one first, and so on. 

Gary Rossington (Lynyrd Skynyrd)

Gary Rossington, the vocalist with with Lynyrd Skynyrd was born 4 December 1951. lynyrd Skynyrd were known for popularizing the Southern hard rock genre during the 1970s Lynyrd Skynyrd were Originally formed In the summer of 1964, when teenage friends Ronnie Van Zant, Allen Collins, and Gary Rossington formed the band “The Noble Five” in Jacksonville, Florida. The band changed in 1965 to “My Backyard”, when Larry Junstrom and Bob Burns joined. In 1968, the group won a local Battle of the Bands contest and the opening slot on several Southeast shows for the California-based psychedelic rock band Strawberry Alarm Clock. the group eventually settled on the name “Leonard Skinner”, a mocking tribute to a physical-education teacher at Robert E. Lee High School, Leonard Skinner, who was notorious for strictly enforcing the school’s policy against boys having long hair.

In 1972 the band was discovered at one of their shows at a club in Atlanta, GA and changed the spelling of the band name to “Lynyrd Skynyrd”. Their fan base continued to grow rapidly throughout 1973, largely due to their opening slot on The Who’s Quadrophenia tour in the United States. Their 1974 follow-up, Second Helping, was the band’s breakthrough hit, and featured their most popular single, “Sweet Home Alabama” helping them rise to worldwide recognition. Lynyrd Skynyrd’s third album, Nuthin’ Fancy, was released in 1975 and the fourth album Gimme Back My Bullets was released in January 1976, but did not achieve the same success as the previous two albums.

Steve Gaines joined the band in June 1976 and the newly-reconstituted band recorded the double-live album One More From the Road at the Fox Theatre (Atlanta, Georgia) in Atlanta, and performed at the Knebworth festival, which also featured The Rolling Stones. The next album 1977′s Street Survivors turned out to be a showcase for guitarist/vocalist Steve Gaines and included the iconic rock anthem “Free Bird”. Sadly though, On October 20, 1977, just three days after the release of Street Survivors, and at the peak of their success, three members (Including Gaines) all died in an airplane crash, Following the crash and the ensuing press, Street Survivors became the band’s second platinum album and reached No. 5 on the U.S. album chart. The single “What’s Your Name” reached No. 13 in January 1978. Surviving members re-formed in 1987 for a reunion tour with lead singer Ronnie Van Zant’s younger brother Johnny as frontman. A version of the band continues to tour and record, with only Gary Rossington of its original members remaining as of 2012. Lynyrd Skynyrd was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 13, 2003. Sadly Bob Burns died recently in 2015 however Lynyrd Skynyrd remain popular with a hardcore group of fans.

Bob Mosley (Moby Grape)

Best known as the bass player and one of the songwriters and vocalists for the band Moby Grape James Robert “Bob” Mosley, was born December 4, 1942, in Paradise Valley, California. Bob Mosley spent his adolescence in San Diego, where he graduated from Kearny High School. One of the first bands that he organized in San Diego was called The Misfits, who had one single on Imperial Records and one on Troy Records in the early 1960s. After playing with the Joel Scott Hill Trio, he relocated to San Francisco where he played with The Vejtables for a brief period.

Mosley has had a varied musical career, including a prominent but interrupted role in Moby Grape during the 1967-1971 period, during which Mosley wrote the Moby Grape songs “Mr. Blues”, “Come In The Morning”, and “Lazy Me” from the first Moby Grape album (1967),
and the commencement of a solo career in 1972. The following year he formed the Darrow Mosley Band with Chris Darrow (formerly of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Kaleidoscope) and issued one album, “Desert Rain.” In 1977 Mosley played with Neil Young in a band called The Ducks, with Jeff Blackburn (guitar/voc) and John Craviotto (drums).

Mosley’s career has been plagued by the challenges of schizophrenia, as was the case with Moby Grape bandmate Skip Spence. Both musicians were homeless for several years. Mosley’s schizophrenia was first diagnosed after he left Moby Grape in 1969, following the release of Moby Grape ’69. Mosley shocked the remaining band members by leaving the band to join the Marines. It was during basic training with the Marines that Mosley was first diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic. He was discharged from the Marines nine months after basic training.
In 1996, three of Mosley’s fellow band members, Jerry Miller, Peter Lewis and Don Stevenson, in part reformed Moby Grape with the objective of helping Mosley recover emotionally and financially. Bob Mosley describes the circumstances as follows:

“In 1996, Peter Lewis picked me up along the side of a San Diego freeway where I was living, to tell me a ruling by San Francisco Judge Garcia gave Moby Grape their name back. I was ready to go to work again.” in relation to the circumstances ultimately leading to the recording of True Blue.

However Earlier attempts by Moby Grape band members to help Mosley out of homelessness had been less successful. One such attempt is described by Peter Lewis as follows: “We went to find Bob, and there he was, living in this cardboard box. He had these friends, the squirrels and the lizards that he had. And I brought this guitar, cost me a hundred bucks, you know, and I left that with him and a tape of Moby Grape songs and a tape recorder with batteries in it and some extra batteries. So the next weekend, I came back, and there was no guitar, but the cassette case… He had tried to tear all the tape out of it and had left it, you know, down there in the bushes. And that’s all that was left. Bob was gone, you know.”;

Efforts to help Mosley out were hampered by the fact that , due to his mental health issues, Mosley Often believed that Don Stevenson was trying to kill him. Stevenson eventually left the band. Unlike bandmate Skip Spence, whose musical output largely ceased within a few years of the onset of schizophrenia, Bob Mosley continues to write songs and record music for much of his life. His most recent solo release is True Blue, released on the Taxim label

Dennis Wilson (Beach Boys)

American drummer, singer and songwriter Dennis Wilson was born December 4, 1944 in Inglewood, California. He was the middle brother of fellow Beach Boys members Brian Wilson and Carl Wilson and was a founding member of The Beach Boys, alongside his brothers, Brian and Carl, and cousin, Mike Love. Dennis Joined the Beach Boys thanks to his mother, Audree, and older cousin, Mike Love.

The Beach Boys formed in August 1961 and became hugely successful. Although the Beach Boys developed, an image based on the California surfing culture, Dennis was the only actual surfer in the band. During the first few years of the Beach Boys, Dennis was given the role of the drummer by his brother, Brian. He quickly learned the basics of drumming, and like the other members, he picked up more on the job.Although he rarely sang backing vocals on stage, occasionally taking a lead, his raspy-sounding vocals were a key ingredient to the group’s vocal blend in the studio, and in the late Sixties and Seventies his lead vocals lent a much-needed bluesy edge to an updating the Beach Boys’ sound, giving their music new dimensions

He sang lead vocals on the early Beach Boys recordings (“Little Girl (You’re My Miss America)” and “This Car of Mine” as well as the bridge verse on “Girls on the Beach”)and “Do You Wanna Dance?”. He also sang an impressive, faithful rendition of The Beatles’ “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away.” And accompanied himself on guitar and like the other Beach Boys became a multi-instrumentalist. Often Assisted by Daryl Dragon, who collaborated on Dennis’s solo album Pacific Ocean Blue. Dennis Wilson’s first major released composition was “Little Bird,” the B-side of the “Friends” single, coupled with “Be Still”. As Brian withdrew Dennis became a major creative force within the Beach Boys, writing many of thesongs which showed cosmic Gothic overtones. such as 20/20 (1969), Sunflower (1970), “So Tough” (1972) and Holland (1973). In 1971, Dennis injured his hand and Ricky Fataar took over as the group’s drummer between 1972 and 1974. During this period Dennis acted as a co-frontman alongside Mike Love, playing keyboards and singing. In 1974 Wilson returned to drumming.

Early in 1963, Dennis teamed with Brian’s former collaborator Gary Usher to form the Four-Speeds, And they released the single “RPM”/”My Stingray”. On December 4, 1970, Wilson released the solo singles”Lady” and “Sound of Fire”, under the name “Dennis Wilson & Rumbo”, this was later covered by American Spring and released as the B-side to their single “Shyin’ Away.”. Wilson released his debut solo album Pacific Ocean Blue in 1977. His collaborators on the album included Daryl Dragon (the ‘Captain’ of Captain & Tennille) and Gregg Jakobson, which became popular. Pacific Ocean Blue’s follow-up album, Bambu, included the songs: “It’s Not Too Late”, “Constant Companion”, “All Alone”, and “Under The Moonlight”. Both PacificBlue and Bambu were rereleased in 2008. Later years saw Wilson battling alcohol abuse. Smoking had also taken a toll on his voice, although the resultant gravelly effect helped define him as a singer.

Sadly On December 28, 1983, shortly after his 39th birthday, Wilson drowned at Marina Del Rey, Los Angeles, after drinking all day and diving in the afternoon to recover items he had thrown overboard at the marina from his yacht three years prior. Dennis Wilson’s body was buried at sea off the California coast (coordinates 33° 53.9 N, 118° 38.8 W) by the U.S. Coast Guard on January 4, 1984. His song “Farewell My Friend” was played at the funeral. Wilson’s life has inspired the 2014 biopic The Drummer, directed and cowritten by Randall Miller. With Aaron Eckhart as Wilson and Vera Farmiga as former Fleetwood Mac member Christine McVie. It co stars Chloë Grace Moretz and Rupert Grint.

Ronnie Corbett CBE

Scottish stand-up comedian, actor, writer and broadcaster, Ronnie Corbett, CBE was born 4 December 1930 in Edinburgh, and was educated at James Gillespie’s High School and the Royal High School in the city, but did not attend university. After leaving school, he decided he wanted to be an actor while performing in amateur theatricals at a church youth club. His first job, however, was with the Ministry of Agriculture. Corbett served his compulsory national service with the Royal Air Force, during which he was the shortest in height commissioned officer in the British Forces. A former aircraftman 2nd class, he was commissioned into the secretarial branch of the RAF as a pilot officer (national service) on 25 May 1950. He received the service number 2446942. He transferred to the reserve (national service list) on 28 October 1951, thereby ending his period of active service. He was promoted to flying officer on 6 September 1952.

Following National Service, Corbett moved to London to start his acting career. In one of his earliest stage appearances, he was billed as “Ronald Corbett” at Cromer, Norfolk, in Take it Easy in 1956, with Graham Stark. He appeared in Crackerjack as a regular in its early days, one episode with Winifred Atwell. He had a walk-on in an early episode of the 1960s series The Saint (as “Ronald Corbett”) and appeared in films including Rockets Galore! (1957), Casino Royale (1967), Some Will, Some Won’t (1970) and the film version of the farce No Sex Please, We’re British (1973).He achieved prominence in David Frost’s 1960s satirical comedy programme The Frost Report (with Barker) and subsequently starred in sitcoms such as No – That’s Me Over Here!, Now Look Here and Sorry!

Corbett starred in the first London production of the musical The Boys from Syracuse (as Dromio of Syracuse) in 1963 at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, alongside Bob Monkhouse. In 1965 he was in cabaret at Winston’s, Danny La Rue’s Mayfair nightclub. David Frost saw him and asked him to appear in The Frost Report. Corbett was in the West End, playing Will Scarlett in Lionel Bart’s Robin Hood musical Twang!!. It failed, leaving Corbett free to accept. It was whilst working at Danny La Rue’s nightclub that Corbett met Anne Hart, who he was to marry that year. The marriage lasted 51 years, until he died.

Corbett first worked with Ronnie Barker in The Frost Report (1966–67). The writers and cast were mostly Oxbridge graduates from Footlights. The show was a mixture of satirical monologues, sketches and music. Corbett and Barker were beginning to be thought of as a pair.They appeared with John Cleese in one of the most repeated comedy sketches in British television: the Class sketch. Corbett also starred in No – That’s Me Over Here!, a sitcom written by Frost Report writers Barry Cryer, Graham Chapman and Eric Idle (ITV 1967–70). Cryer and Chapman wrote two follow-ups: Now Look Here (BBC 1971–73) and The Prince of Denmark (BBC 1974). Corbett also appeared in Frost on Sunday (ITV 1968) and hosted The Corbett Follies (ITV 1969). From 1971 until 1987 Corbett’s appeared in the BBC television comedy show The Two Ronnies with Ronnie Barker, In which Barker and Corbett performed sketches and musical numbers, Corbett also presented a humorous monologue.

Corbett’s best-known role away from The Two Ronnies was as the 40-something Timothy Lumsden, dominated by his mother, in the sitcom Sorry! (1981–88). In 1996, he appeared on the première of the short-lived BBC game show Full Swing, hosted by Jimmy Tarbuck. Corbett played Reggie Sea Lions in the film Fierce Creatures, written by his former Frost Report colleague John Cleese. Corbett also hosted the game show Small Talk and portrayed Griselda in a television production of Cinderella in 2000. In 2004, Corbett appeared on the BBC news quiz Have I Got News for You and In 2005, Corbett reunited with Ronnie Barker for The Two Ronnies Sketchbook, comedy sketches from their original series with newly recorded material, Corbett also appeared with comedian Peter Kay in the music video for the Comic Relief single, a cover version of Tony Christie’s “Is This the Way to Amarillo?”

He performed in the Children’s Party at the Palace as Mr Tibbs, the Queen’s butler. In 2006, Corbett played a hyper-realised version of himself in Extras, caught taking drugs at the BAFTA Awards, He also starred as himself in Little Britain Abroad. He opened the centre in Cromer, Norfolk, named after Henry Blogg and was a guest in the BBC Radio 4 show Desert Island Discs in 2007. He also featured as a Slitheen in a Sarah Jane Adventures episode for Red Nose Day 2009 and appeared in the John Landis thriller comedy Burke & Hare. He was also a panellist in the BBC 1 comedy show Would I Lie to You? And starred of the Good Food HD programme Ronnie Corbett’s Supper Club with Rob Brydon and Steve Speirs. He also starred in a one-off special, The One Ronnie and From 2010, Corbett starred in the BBC Radio 4 sitcom When The Dog Dies, with Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent, who also wrote Sorry!

During his distinguished career Corbett garnered many awards and accolades, Already an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE), Corbett was promoted to Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2012 New Year Honours for services to entertainment and charity. Sadly On 31 March 2016, Corbett died at the age of 85, at Shirley Oaks Hospital in Shirley near Croydon, shortly after having been diagnosed with motor neurone disease. He is survived by his wife and two daughters.