The man who didn’t Call by Rosie Walsh

The Man Who Didn’t Call by Rosie Walsh is a heart- wrenching romantic love story with a dark secret at its heart and a twist. it features a character named Sarah MacKay who is on her yearly visit to her parents in the UK. She and her ex-husband run a charity back in California. They train Clown Doctors who work with children in hospital. Sarah and her ex Reuben had been together for a long time

Then she meets Eddie David and she is completely bowled over by the strength of her emotions. It really is love at first sight and they are inseparable for seven days. Eddie has a holiday booked with his mates and Sarah must return to the US but they don’t say goodbye, instead They decide that when Eddie returns in a fortnight they will plan their future together.

However Eddie doesn’t call. Two weeks pass and Sarah’s emotions range from anger to fear. She was convinced Eddie felt the same way about her but she’s heard nothing. His phone’s unavailable, there’s no sign of him on social media. He seems to have completely disappeared. Sarah’s friends try to persuade her to forget him however she becomes convinced something bad must have happened to Eddie and there must be a reason for his silence. So she begins a desperate quest to discover where he is and what happened to him, however she is totally unprepared for what she actually does find.

Events and holidays happening on 22 December

National Cookie Exchange Day

National Cookie Exchange Day takes place annually on 22 December. It has been observed since 2015. Cookies first came to prominence in areas where sugar was abundant thousands of years ago, and cakes were an extreme delicacy. In order to test the cakes with the ingredients they had, it’s believed they made miniature versions as trial cakes.

The first form of “cookie exchanges” began during the Middle Ages. During this period, spices and dried exotic fruits were becoming increasingly popular in baking methods. At first Cookies were expensive and considered exotic so families could only afford to bake cookies at Christmastime. They shared these special treats with family, friends, and neighbors.

Christmas cookies had ingredients like cinnamon, ginger, and dried fruit. By the seventeenth century, different types of Christmas biscuits were popular in different European countries. The Dutch brought Christmas cookies to the United States in the seventeenth century. Many cookie cutters were being imported from Germany by the end of the nineteenth century, which led to the proliferation of cookie recipes in cookbooks. Christmas cookies made with cookie cutters often depict candy canes, angels, stars, Santa, and Christmas trees.

National Date Nut Bread Day

National Date Nut Bread Day is an unofficial holiday which takes place annually on December 22

Dates are the fruit of the date palm. Food historians believe that the date palm was first cultivated for its fruit in the Middle East around 6000 BC and have been a staple food of the Middle East and the Indus Valley for thousands of years. They have been cultivated since ancient times from Mesopotamia to prehistoric Egypt. The Spaniards introduced dates into Mexico and California in 1765. Dates provide essential nutrients and are an excellent source of dietary potassium. In ripe dates, the sugar content is about 80% with the remainder consisting of protein, fibre and trace elements of boron, cobalt, copper, fluorine, magnesium, manganese, selenium and zinc. Farmers classify dates based on their texture and the sugar content into 3 types. These are soft, dry and semi-dry dates.

A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible. In general usage, a wide variety of dried seeds are called nuts, but in a botanical context “nut” implies that the shell does not open to release the seed (indehiscent). The translation of “nut” in certain languages frequently requires paraphrases, as the word is ambiguous.

Most seeds come from fruits that naturally free themselves from the shell, unlike nuts such as hazelnuts, chestnuts, and acorns, which have hard shell walls and originate from a compound ovary. The general and original usage of the term is less restrictive, and many nuts (in the culinary sense), such as almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and Brazil nuts, are not nuts in a botanical sense. Common usage of the term often refers to any hard-walled, edible kernel as a nut.

Many nuts are good sources of vitamins E and B2 and are also rich in protein, folate fiber and essential minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper and selenium. Several studies have shown that those who consume nuts on a regular basis are less likely to suffer from coronary heart disease. (CHD) It was in 1993 that nuts were first linked to protections against CHD. Since that time, many clinical trials have found that consumption of various nuts such as almonds and walnuts can lower serum LDL cholesterol concentrations.

Beatrix Potter

English author, illustrator, natural scientist and conservationist Beatrix Potter sadly passed away 22 December 1943 near Sawry. She was Born 28th July 1866 and is best known for her imaginative children’s books featuring animals such as those in The Tale of Peter Rabbit which celebrated the British landscape and country life. She was born into a privileged Unitarian family, and along with her younger brother, Walter Bertram, grew up with few friends outside her large extended family. Her parents were artistic, interested in nature and enjoyed the countryside.

As children, Beatrix and Bertram had numerous small animals as pets which they observed closely and drew endlessly. Summer holidays were spent in Scotland and in the English Lake District where Beatrix developed a love of the natural world which was the subject of her painting from an early age.She was educated by private governesses until she was eighteen. Her study of languages, literature, science and history was broad and she was an eager student. Her artistic talents were recognized early. Although she was provided with private art lessons, Potter preferred to develop her own style, particularly favouring watercolour. Along with her drawings of her animals, real and imagined, she illustrated insects, fossils, archeological artefacts, and fungi. In the 1890s her mycological illustrations and research on the reproduction of fungi spores generated interest from the scientific establishment.

The Tale of Mister Tod http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RSHGpAlCt00

After illustrating cards and booklets, Potter wrote and illustrated The Tale of Peter Rabbit publishing it as a small, three-colour illustrated book with Frederick Warne & Co. Potter then went on to write many other books (such as The Tale of Ginger and Pickles, about the local shop in Near Sawrey and The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse, a wood mouse) which reflected her increasing participation in village life and her delight in country living. Between 1902 & 1922 Potter Wrote, illustrated and designed spin-off merchandise based on her children’s books for Warne and published over twenty-three books.With the proceeds from the books and a legacy from an aunt, Potter bought Hill Top Farm Near Sawrey, a tiny village in the English Lake District near Ambleside in 1905. Over the next several decades, she purchased additional farms to preserve the unique hill country landscape. Realising she needed to protect her boundaries she sought advice from Solicitors W.H. Heelis & Son. With William Heelis acting for her she bought contiguous pasture. In 1912 Heelis proposed and Beatrix accepted and The couple moved immediately to Castle Cottage, the renovated farm house on Castle Farm. Hill Top remained a working farm but was now remodelled to allow for the tenant family and Potter’s private studio and work shop.

Potter settled into country life with her solicitor husband and his large family, her farms, the Sawrey community. The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck and The Tale of Tom Kitten are representative of Hill Top Farm and of her farming life, and reflect her happiness with her country life. Potter also became a prize-winning breeder of Herdwick sheep and a prosperous farmer keenly interested in land preservation. She also established a Nursing Trust for local villages, and served on various committees and councils responsible for footpaths and other country life issues, Potter had been a disciple of the land conservation and preservation ideals of her long-time friend and mentor, Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley, the first secretary and founding member of the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty. She supported the efforts of the National Trust to preserve not just the places of extraordinary beauty, but those heads of valley and low grazing lands that would be irreparably ruined by development. She was also an authority on the traditional Lakeland crafts, period furniture and stonework and restored and preserved the farms that she bought or managed, making sure that each farm house had in it a piece of antique Lakeland furniture. Potter was interested in preserving not only the Herdwick sheep, but the way of life of fell farming.

In 1930 the Heelises became partners with the National Trust in buying and managing the fell farms included in the large Monk Coniston Estate. The estate was composed of many farms spread over a wide area of western Lancashire, including the famously beautiful Tarn Hows. Potter became the de facto estate manager for the Trust for seven years until the National Trust could afford to buy most of the property back from her. Her stewardship of these farms earned her wide regard. She was notable in observing the problems of afforestation, preserving the intake grazing lands, and husbanding the quarries and timber on these farms. All her farms were stocked with Herdwick sheep and frequently with Galloway cattle.

Following her death Beatrix Potter left almost all her property to the National Trust including over 4,000 acres (16 km2) of land, sixteen farms, cottages and herds of cattle and Herdwick sheep. Potter is credited with preserving much of the land that now comprises the Lake District National Park and left almost all the original illustrations for her books to the National Trust. The copyright to her stories and merchandise was given to her publisher Frederick Warne & Co, now a division of the Penguin Group. Hill Top Farm was opened to the public by the National Trust in 1946 her artwork was displayed there until 1985 when it was moved to William Heelis’s former law offices in Hawkshead, also owned by the National Trust as the Beatrix Potter Gallery. Potter gave her folios of mycological drawings to the Armitt Library and Museum in Ambleside before her death. The Tale of Peter Rabbit is owned by Frederick Warne and Company, The Tailor of Gloucester by the Tate Gallery and The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies by the British Museum. The largest public collection of her letters and drawings is the Leslie Linder Bequest and Leslie Linder Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. In the United States, the largest public collections are those in the Special Collections of the Free Library of Philadelphia, and the Lloyd Cotsen Children’s Library at Princeton University. To this day Potter’s books continue to sell throughout the world, in multiple languages, and Her stories have been retold in song, film, ballet and animation.

Maurice and Robin Gibb (Bee Gees)

Best remembered as being two members of the phenomenally successful Bee Gees, The late great Maurice and Robin Gibb were both born 22nd December 1949. The three Gibb brothers, Barry Robin and Maurice, made their earliest performances at local movie theatres in Manchester in 1955, singing between shows. Robin Gibb and his brothers seemed to have a natural talent that allowed them to write hit songs with ease. In the 1950′s the Gibb brothers emigrated to Australia with their parents.In the mid-1960′s the Gibb brothers returned to England to further their singing careers. Their early recordings, including dramatic hits such as Massachusetts (1967), drew comparisons with the Beatles.

The trio reached the Top Ten with I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You and I Started a Joke (both 1968) but split briefly after the relative failure of their concept album Odessa (1969), but reunited in 1970 and had hits with Lonely Days (1970) and How Can You Mend a Broken Heart (1971). They returned to the charts with Main Course in 1975 – in which they produced a new sound – the emphasis being on dance rhythms, high harmonies, and a funk beat, and their trademark falsetto harmonies propelled the Bee Gees right to the forefront of the disco movement and turned it into a global phenomenon, with hits including Stayin’ Alive Jive Talkin’, You Should Be Dancing and Night Fever, which featured on the soundtrack of the 1977 film Saturday Night Fever, starring John Travolta.

THE BEST OF THE BEE GEES http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TnQuYv5gY-g

Their success was not limited to recordings issued under their own name either. Individually and together they’ve also written and produced major hits for artists including Barbra Streisand, Diana Ross, Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers, as well as Frankie Valli. During a lengthy career, they have sold more than 200 million records and become the first and only songwriters to place five songs in the Top Ten at the same time. In 1997 the band was also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and are among the most successful vocal groups in rock and roll history, Sadly though both Maurice and Robin Gibb have passed away, but they have left the world some fantastic music.