Robot

The first episode of the Doctor Who story Robot was broadcast 28 December 1974. Starring Tom Baker, Elizabeth Sladen Nicholas Courtney and Ian Marter. It starts shortly after the Doctor’s third regeneration, The Doctor is still rather disorientated so Sarah Jane Smith, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart and Lieutenant Harry Sullivan of UNIT keep tabs on him. Nevertheless The Doctor tries to sneak off in his TARDIS, but the Brigadier and Sarah Jane stop him. The Doctor then learns about the theft of top secret plans for a disintegrator gun. So The Brigadier and the Doctor investigate the Ministry of Defence advanced research centre where the plans were stored and UNIT is dispatched to protect factories where critical parts for the gun are manufactured to stop more thefts.

Elsewhere Sarah Jane investigates the National Institute for Advanced Scientific Research, colloquially known as the “Think Tank” and discovers that director Hilda Winters and her assistant Arnold Jellicoe are developing a robot, Experimental Prototype Robot K1, to be used to perform hazardous tasks in hazardous locations. Sarah Jane learns that K1 was originally built by Professor J.P. Kettlewell, a former member of the Think Tank who has now turned his sights on alternative energy.

The Doctor learns that Winters, Jellicoe, Kettlewell and other members of Think Tank are part of the sinister Scientific Reform Society. Their agenda includes Putting scientists in charge of the world believing they can make better decisions for humanity than the current governments. They have reprogrammed K1 to go round clobbering people with the disintigrator gun and steal important information including the launch codes for the nuclear weapons of the major nations. Using her investigative skills Sarah Jane learns The identity of the  mastermind behind this dastardly plot while Winters Blackmails the world governments into complying with the demands of the Scientific Reform Society by threatening to launch the Nuclear missiles and it is up to the Doctor to stop them.

Day of the Holy Innocents

The Day of the Innocents takes place annually on 28 December. Day of the Holy Innocents commemorates The Massacre of the Innocents when, According to the Gospel of Matthew, Herod the Great, the Roman-appointed King of the Jews, ordered the execution of all young male children in the vicinity of Bethlehem,  to avoid the loss of his throne to a newborn King of the Jews whose birth had been announced to him by the Magi. In typical Matthean style, it is understood as the fulfillment of an Old Testament prophecy: Then was fulfilled that which was spoken through Jeremiah the prophet, saying, ‘A voice is heard in Ramah, mourning and great weeping, Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted, because her children are no more.'” The number of infants killed is not stated.

The Holy Innocents, although Jewish, have also been claimed as martyrs for Christianity. Since all the canonical evidence that such an event occurred is found only in the Gospel of Matthew, New Testament, many scholars have questioned the historical accuracy of the event. Most recent biographers of Herod deny that the event occurred. The massacre is not reported outside of the Gospel of Matthew (2:16) and other later Christian writings likely based on that gospel. The Roman Jewish historian, Josephus, does not mention it in his history, Antiquities of the Jews (c. 94 AD), which reports many of Herod’s misdeeds, including murdering his own sons.

Some historians regard the story as part of a creative hagiography while other scholars argue that the story is an apologetic device or a contrived fulfillment of prophecy, and others point to the silence of Josephus, who does record several examples of Herod’s use of violence to protect his power, including the murder of his own sons, which made a deep impression at the time.

Matthew’s purpose was to present Jesus as the Messiah, and the Massacre of the Innocents as the fulfillment of passages in Hosea (referring to the exodus), and in Jeremiah (referring to the Babylonian exile). There are also similarities with the Exodus account of the birth of Moses and the tenth plague, which involved the killing of the Hebrew firstborn by Pharaoh (Exodus 11:5). Based on Bethlehem’s estimated population of 1,000 at the time, the largest number of infants that could have been killed would have been about twenty, and not the larger number recorded by Josephus”.

Aquaman

I would like to watch The exciting DC super hero film Aquaman. It is Directed by James Wan, with a screenplay by David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick and Will Beall. it stars Jason Momoa as the title character, with Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Patrick Wilson, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Temuera Morrison and Nicole Kidman.

It begins In 1985 Maine, when lighthouse keeper Thomas Curry rescues Atlanna, the princess of the underwater nation of Atlantis, during a storm. They eventually fall in love and have a son named Arthur, who is born with the power to communicate with marine lifeforms. Atlanna is forced to abandon her family and return to Atlantis. her loyal advisor Nuidis Vulko trains Arthur and under Vulko’s guidance, Arthur becomes a skilled warrior but is rejected by the Atlanteans for being a half-breed and leaves Atlantis.

Arthur confronts a group of pirates attempting to hijack a Russian Naval nuclear submarine. Their leader, Jesse Kane, dies and his son, David Kane, vows revenge against Arthur. David later targets Atlantis at the behest of Orm, Arthur’s younger half-brother and Atlantis’ king uses the attack as an excuse to declare war on the surface. King Nereus of Xebel swears allegiance to Orm’s cause, but his daughter Mera, who has been betrothed to Orm, refuses to aid them and asks Arthur for help. They consult Vulko, who urges Arthur to find the Trident of Atlan, a magic artifact that once belonged to Atlantis’ first ruler in order to reclaim his rightful place as king.

Arthur learns that Atlanna was executed and Orm offers Him the opportunity to live in exile, but Arthur instead challenges him to a duel. Mera intervenes, Arthur and Mera journey to the Sahara desert where the trident was forged then to Sicily. Meanwhile Orm provides David with Atlantean armor and weaponry and sends him to stop them. He finally confronts Arthur and Mera In Sicily and Upon Arriving at their next destination, Arthur and Mera are attacked by amphibious monsters before ending up in an uncharted sea Where they meet someone unexpected and Arthur confronts the mythical monster Karathen, in order to obtain the Trident and become ruler of the Seven seas. Meanwhile Orm and his allies are trying to unite the seven underwater kingdoms against the surface world and it is up to Aquaman to stop them…

Sam Peckinpah

Legendary American film director and screenwriter David Samuel Peckinpah Sadly died of heart failure on December 28, 1984 after a life time of hard living eventually caught up with him. He was born February 21, 1925 in Fresno, California, where he attended both grammar school and high school. He spent much time skipping classes with his brother to engage in cowboy activities on their grandfather Denver Church’s ranch, including trapping, branding, and shooting. During the 1930s and 1940s, Coarsegold and Bass Lake were still populated with descendants of the miners and ranchers of the 19th century. Many of these descendants worked on Church’s ranch. At that time, it was a rural area undergoing extreme change, and this exposure is believed to have affected Peckinpah’s Western films later in life.

He played on the junior varsity football team while at Fresno High School, but frequent fighting and discipline problems caused his parents to enroll him in the San Rafael Military Academy for his senior year. In 1943, he joined the United States Marine Corps and was sent to China with the task of disarming Japanese soldiers and repatriating them following World War II. Although He did not see combat, he witnessed acts of war between Chinese and Japanese soldiers including acts of torture and the murder of a laborer by sniper fire. The American Marines were not permitted to intervene. Peckinpah also claimed he was shot during an attack by Communist forces. He also applied for discharge in Peking, so he could marry a local woman, but was refused. His experiences in China reportedly deeply affected him.

After being discharged in Los Angeles, he attended California State University, Fresno, where he studied history. While a student, he met and married his first wife, Marie Selland, in 1947. A drama major, Selland introduced Peckinpah to the theater department and he became interested in directing for the first time. During his senior year, he adapted and directed a one-hour version of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie. After graduation in 1948, Peckinpah enrolled in graduate studies in drama at University of Southern California. He spent two seasons as the director in residence at Huntington Park Civic Theatre near Los Angeles before obtaining his master’s degree. Peckinpah then began working as a stagehand at KLAC-TV in the belief that television experience would eventually lead to work in films.

In 1954, Peckinpah was hired as a dialogue coach for the film Riot in Cell Block 11. His job entailed acting as an assistant for the movie’s director, Don Siegel. The film was shot on location at Folsom Prison. Reportedly, the warden was reluctant to allow the filmmakers to work at the prison until he was introduced to Peckinpah. The warden knew his family from Fresno and was immediately cooperative. Siegel’s location work and his use of actual prisoners as extras in the film made a lasting impression on Peckinpah. He worked as a dialogue coach on four additional Siegel films: Private Hell 36, An Annapolis Story, Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Crime in the Streets. Invasion of the Body Snatchers, starred Kevin McCarthy and Dana Wynton and became one of the most critically praised science fiction films of the 1950s and features a cameo by Peckinpah as Charlie the meter reader.

On the recommendation of Don Siegel, Peckinpah established himself during the late 1950s as a scriptwriter of western series of the era, selling scripts to Gunsmoke, Have Gun – Will Travel, The Rifleman, Broken Arrow, Klondike, and Dick Powell’s Zane Grey Theatre. He wrote one episode “The Town” (December 13, 1957) for the CBS series, Trackdown, starring Robert Culp as the Texas Ranger Hoby Gilman, this concerns a cowardly town afraid to resist the clutches of an outlaw gang. Peckinpah wrote a screenplay from the novel The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones, which became the 1961 Marlon Brando film One-Eyed Jack. His writing led to directing, and he directed a 1958 episode of Broken Arrow and several 1960 episodes of Klondike, (co-starring James Coburn, L. Q. Jones, Ralph Taeger, Joi Lansing, and Mari Blanchard). He also directed the CBS sitcom Mr. Adams and Eve, starring Howard Duff and Ida Lupino.

In 1958, Peckinpah wrote a script for Gunsmoke that was rejected due to content. He reworked the screenplay, titled The Sharpshooter, and sold it to Zane Grey Theater. The episode received popular response and became the television series The Rifleman, starring Chuck Connors. Peckinpah directed four episodes of the series (with guest stars R. G. Armstrong and Warren Oates), but left after the first year. The Rifleman ran for five seasons and has since achieved enduring popularity. In 1962, Peckinpah directed two hour-long episodes for The Dick Powell Theater. In the second of these, The Losers, an updated remake of The Westerner set in the present day with Lee Marvin as Dave Blassingame and Keenan Wynn as Dehner’s character Bergundy Smith, he mixed slow motion, fast motion and stills together to capture violence, a technique famously put to more sophisticated use in 1969s The Wild Bunch.

He also created the television series The Westerner, starring Brian Keith and in three episodes also featuring John Dehner. Peckinpah wrote and directed a pilot called Trouble at Tres Cruzes Which ran for only 13 episodes before cancellation mainly due to its gritty content detailing the drifting, laconic cowboy Dave Blassingame (Brian Keith). However despite its short run The Westerner and Peckinpah were nominated by the Producers Guild of America for Best Filmed Series. An episode of the series eventually served as the basis for Tom Gries’ 1968 film Will Penny starring Charlton Heston and The Westerner has since achieved cult status,

Throughout much of his adult life, Peckinpah was affected by alcoholism, and, later, other forms of drug addiction. He may have had a mental issue, possibly manic depression or paranoia.It is believed his drinking problems began during his service in the military while stationed in China, when he frequented the saloons of Tianjin and Beijing.Peckinpah divorced Selland, the mother of his first four children, and in 1960, hemarried the Mexican actress Begoña Palacios in 1965. A stormy relationship developed, and over the years they married on three separate occasions. They had one daughter together. His personality swung between a sweet, softly-spoken, artistic disposition, and bouts of rage and violence As An experienced hunter, Peckinpah was fascinated with firearms and was known to shoot the mirrors in his house while drunk. Peckinpah’s reputation as a hard-living brute with a taste for violence, inspired the content in his most popular films and affected his artistic legacy. Peckinpah seems to have inspired extraordinary loyalty in certain friends and employees. He used the same actors (Warren Oates, L. Q. Jones, R. G. Armstrong, James Coburn, Ben Johnson, and Kris Kristofferson), and collaborators (Jerry Fielding, Lucien Ballard, Gordon Dawson, and Martin Baum).

Peckinpah spent a great deal of his life in Mexico after his marriage to Palacios, eventually buying property in the country. He was reportedly fascinated by the Mexican lifestyle and culture, and he often portrayed it with an unusual sentimentality and romanticism in his films. His best known films include The Wild Bunch, Major Dundee, Straw Dogs, The Getaway, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, Cross of Iron, The Deadly Companions, Ride the High Country, The Cincinnati Kid, Noon Wine, The Ballad of Cable Hogue, Junior Bonner, The Killer Elite, Cross of Iron, Convoy and The Osterman Weekend. Four of these films, Major Dundee (1965), The Wild Bunch (1969), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), were filmed entirely on location within Mexico, while The Getaway (1972) concludes with a couple escaping to freedom there. During his final years Peckinpah was seriously ill. Regardless, he continued to work until his last months and was working on the script for On the Rocks, which was due to be filmed in San Francisco. Peckinpah lived at the Murray Hotel in Livingston, Montana, from 1979 until his death in 1984.

Lemmy (Hawkwind, Mötorhead)

Heavy Metal Legend Ian “Lemmy” kilmister sadly died December 28 2015 age 70 after succumbing to an extremely aggressive form of cancer. He was Born 24 December 1945 and his nickname “Lemmy” originated from the phrase “lemmy [lend me] a quid till Friday” because of his habit of borrowing money from people to feed his addiction to fruit machines. When he was 16 He saw The Beatles perform at the Cavern Club and this inspired him to learn guitar, He also admired the sarcastic attitude of the group, particularly that of John Lennon. Upon leaving school and with his family relocated in Conwy, Lemmy undertook a few temporary jobs including working at the local Hotpoint factory while also playing guitar for local bands, such as The Sundowners, and spending time at a horse riding school. At the age of 17, he met a holidaying girl named Cathy. Lemmy followed her to Stockport, Cheshire, where she had his son Sean.

In Stockport, he joined local bands The Rainmakers and then The Motown Sect who enjoyed playing northern clubs for three years. Wanting to progress further, in 1965 he joined The Rockin’ Vickers who signed a deal with CBS, released three singles and toured Europe, reportedly being the first British band to visit Yugoslavia. With the band living in a Manchester flat, he had a relationship with a girl named Tracy who bore him a son, Paul Inder, although it would not be until the boy was six that Lemmy had any involvement with him.In the film Lemmy he speaks briefly of having another son by an unnamed woman. It appears this child was adopted because the mother has only recently “found him” and “hadn’t got the heart to tell him who his father was”.Wanting to progress, Lemmy relocated to London in 1967. Sharing a flat with Noel Redding and Neville Chesters, he got a job as a roadie for The Jimi Hendrix Experience. In 1968 he joined Sam Gopal and recorded the album Escalator and the single “Horse”. At that point Lemmy was thinking about changing his legal name to his stepfather’s surname of Willis, and appeared on the Escalatoralbum as Ian Willis; but he decided changing his birth certificate and passport would be too much hassle, so did not bother.[citation needed]After meeting Simon King in a Chelsea shopping centre in 1969, he joined the band Opal Butterfly, but the group soon folded, having previously failed to raise enough interest with their preceding CBS singles.An attempted reconciliation in 1970 between Lemmy and his birth father broke down, with Lemmy describing him as a “nasty little weasel”.

ln 1972, Lemmy joined the space rock band Hawkwind, as a bassist and vocalist. He had no previous experience as a bass guitarist, but quickly developed a distinctive style that was strongly shaped by his early experience as a rhythm guitarist, often using double stops and chords rather than the single note lines preferred by most bassists. His bass work was a fundamental part of the Hawkwind sound during his tenure, perhaps best documented on Space Ritual. He also provided the lead vocals on a number of songs, including the band’s biggest UK chart single, “Silver Machine”, which reached No.3 in 1972. ln 1975 Lemmy was fired from Hawkwind after he was arrested at the Canadian/US border in Windsor, Ontario on drug possession charges; he spent five days in jail. Lemmy was released without charge as Windsor Police had arrested him for possession of cocaine and after testing the evidence it turned out to be speed. So according to Canadian law at the time, he couldn’t be charged with anything and was released with no charge or conviction.

He went on to form a new band called “Bastard” with guitarist Larry Wallis (former member of the Pink Fairies, Steve Took’s Shagrat and UFO) and drummer Lucas Fox. Lemmy’s connection with Took (formerly of T. Rex) was not limited to Wallis, as they were personal friends and Took was the stepfather to Lemmy’s son, Paul. When his manager informed him that a band by the name of “Bastard” would never get a slot on “Top of the Pops”, Lemmy changed the band’s name to “Motörhead” – the title of the last song he had written for Hawkwind.Lemmy playing bass and singing. The high microphone position has become a Lemmy trademark.Soon after, both Wallis and Fox were replaced with guitarist “Fast” Eddie Clarke and drummer Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor and with this line-up the band began to achieve success.

The band’s sound appealed to both Lemmy’s original fans and to fans of punk rock. he also played with The Damned for a handful of gigs when they had no regular bassist Lemmy’s guttural vocals were unique in rock at that time, and would not be copied until the rise in popularity of punk. The band’s success peaked between 1980 and 1981 with a number of UK chart hits, including the classic single “Ace of Spades”, which is still a crowd favourite and the #1 on the live album No Sleep ’til Hammersmith. Motörhead have since gone on to become one of the most influential bands in heavy metal and although Lemmy is the only constant member, are still performing and releasing records. Despite Motörhead’s many member changes over their 37-year history, the current lineup of Lemmy, Phil Campbell and Mikkey Dee has remained constant since 1995.

Lemmy has also worked with a number of other musicians over his career and occasionally guests with Hawkwind. He wrote the song “R.A.M.O.N.E.S” for the Ramones, which he still plays in his live sets as a tribute to the band. He was brought in as a songwriter for Ozzy Osbourne’s 1991 No More Tears album, providing lyrics for the tracks “Hellraiser”, (which Motörhead would later record themselves and release a single), “Desire”, “I Don’t Want to Change the World” and the single “Mama I’m Coming Home”. Lemmy has noted in several magazine and television interviews that he made more money from the royalties of that one song than he had in his entire time with Motörhead. After being diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes in 2000, which led to a brief hospitalisation, Lemmy again appeared with Motörhead at WrestleMania 17.

Lemmy published his autobiography, White Line Fever in November 2002. In 2005, Motörhead won their first Grammy in the Best Metal Performancecategory with their cover of Metallica’s “Whiplash”. Since 1990 he has lived in Los Angeles, California, currently resident in a two-room apartment two blocks away from his favourite hangout, the Rainbow Bar and Grill. Unfortunately in 2000, Lemmy was diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes, and this led to a brief hospitalisation. In 2002 Lemmy published his autobiography, White Line Fever .In 2005, Motörhead won their first Grammy in the Best Metal Performance category with their cover of Metallica’s “Whiplash”. In October 2009 it was announced that he had been involved in recording a cover of “Stand by Me” featuring Lemmy on vocals and bass, Dave Lombardo of Slayer on drums, which was made for professional skateboarder Geoff Rowley. In 2011 Lemmy also appeared on the song Debauchery As A Fine Art from Michael Monroe’s new solo album called Sensory Overload.

Nichelle Nichols

Grace Dell Nichols was born in Robbins, Illinois, near Chicago, to Samuel Earl Nichols, a factory worker who was elected both town mayor of Robbins and its chief magistrate, and his wife, Lishia (Parks) Nichols Later, the family moved to Chicago. She studied in Chicago as well as New York and Los Angeles. Her break came in an appearance in Kicks and Co., Oscar Brown’s highly touted, but ill-fated 1961 musical. In a thinly veiled satire of Playboy magazine, she played Hazel Sharpe, a voluptuous campus queen who was being tempted by the devil and Orgy Magazine to become “Orgy Maiden of the Month”. This attracted the attention of Hugh Hefner, the publisher of Playboy, who booked her for his Chicago Playboy Club. While still in Chicago, she performed at the “Blue Angel”, and in New York, Nichols appeared at that city’s Blue Angel as a dancer and singer. She also appeared in the role of Carmen for a Chicago stock company production of Carmen Jones and performed in a New York production of Porgy and Bess.

In 1967, Nichols also was featured on the cover of Ebony magazine. Nichols toured the United States, Canada and Europe as a singer with the Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton bands. she also appeared in The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd, For My People, and garnered high praise for her performance in the James Baldwin play Blues for Mister Charlie. Prior to being cast as Lieutenant Uhura in Star Trek, Nichols was a guest actress on television producer Gene Roddenberry’s first series The Lieutenant (1964) in an episode, “To Set It Right”, which dealt with racial prejudice.

Following her appearance On Star Trek, Nichols gained popular recognition by being one of the first black women featured in a major television series not portraying a servant; her prominent supporting role as a bridge officer was unprecedented. During the first year of the series, Nichols was tempted to leave the show, as she wanted to pursue a Broadway career; however, a conversation with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at a fund-raiser at the NAACP changed her mind when King personally told her he was her biggest fan and encouraged her to stay on Star Trek because she was playing a vital role model for black children and young women across the country, as well as for other children who would see blacks appearing as equals. In her role as Lieutenant Uhura, Nichols famously kissed white actor William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk in the November 22, 1968, Star Trek episode “Plato’s Stepchildren”. Former NASA astronaut Mae Jemison has cited Nichols’ role of Lieutenant Uhura as her inspiration for wanting to become an astronaut and Whoopi Goldberg has also spoken of Nichols’ influence. Goldberg asked for a role on Star Trek: The Next Generation,and the character of Guinan was specially created, while Jemison appeared in an episode of the series.

Sadly Star Trek was cancelled in 1969. Despite this, Star Trek lived on in other ways, and continued to play a part in Nichols’ life. She again provided the voice of Uhura in Star Trek: The Animated Series; in one episode, “The Lorelei Signal”, Uhura assumes command of the Enterprise. Nichols has also co-starred in six Star Trek films, the last one being Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Following the cancellation of Star Trek, Nichelle Nichols volunteered her time in a special project with NASA called Women in Motion which recruits minority and female personnel for the space agency. Members of Women in Motion included Dr. Sally Ride, the first American female astronaut, and United States Air Force Colonel Guion Bluford, the first African-American astronaut, as well as Dr. Judith Resnik and Dr. Ronald McNair, who both flew successful missions during the Space Shuttle program before their deaths in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster on January 28, 1986. Recruits also included Charles Bolden, the current NASA administrator and veteran of four shuttle missions, Frederick D. Gregory, former deputy administrator and a veteran of three shuttle missions and Lori Garver, former deputy administrator.

Nichols is An enthusiastic advocate of space exploration, and has served since the mid-1980s on the board of governors of the National Space Society, a nonprofit, educational space advocacy organization founded by Dr. Wernher von Braun. In 2015 Nichols flew aboard NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Boeing 747SP, which analyzed the atmospheres of Mars and Saturn on an eight-hour, high-altitude mission. She was also a special guest at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in 1976, to view the Viking 1 soft landing on Mars. She also attended the christening of the first space shuttle, Enterprise, at the North American Rockwell assembly facility in Palmdale, California together with other cast members from the original Star Trek series.

In 1994, Nichols published her autobiography Beyond Uhura: Star Trek and Other Memories. Between 1970 and 1979 Nichols appeared in small television and film roles Such as a secretary in Doctor, You’ve Got to Be Kidding! (1967), and a foul-mouthed madam in Truck Turner (1974) opposite Isaac Hayes. Nichols appeared in animated form as one of Al Gore’s Vice Presidential Action Rangers in the “Anthology of Interest I” episode of Futurama, and she provided the voice of her own head in a glass jar in the episode “Where No Fan Has Gone Before”. She voiced the recurring role of Elisa Maza’s mother Diane Maza in the animated series Gargoyles, and played Thoth-Kopeira in an episode of Batman: The Animated Series. In 2004, she appeared in animated form in The Simpsons episode “Simple Simpson”. In the 2002 comedy Snow Dogs, Nichols appeared as the mother of the male lead, played by Cuba Gooding, Jr. In 2006, she appeared as the title character in the film Lady Magdalene’s, the madam of a legal Nevada brothel in tax default. She also served as executive producer and choreographer, and sang three songs in the film, composing two. Nichols is also an accomplished dancer and singer.

She has twice been nominated for the Chicago theatrical Sarah Siddons Award for Best Actress. The first nomination was for her portrayal of Hazel Sharpe in Kicks and Co. Nichols also played a recurring role on the second season of the NBC drama Heroes. Her first appearance was on the episode “Kindred”, in which she portrayed Nana Dawson, the matriarch of a New Orleans family financially and personally devastated by Hurricane Katrina, who cares for her orphaned grandchildren and her great-nephew, Micah Sanders. In 2008, she starred in the film The Torturer, playing the role of a psychiatrist. In 2009, she joined the cast of The Cabonauts, a sci-fi musical comedy that debuted on the Internet. Playing CJ, the CEO of the Cabonauts Inc, Nichols is also featured singing and dancing. In 2010, she toured the space shuttle simulator and Mission Control at the Johnson Space Center and In 2016, she was introduced as the aging mother of Neil Winters on the long-standing soap opera The Young and the Restless. She received her first Daytime Emmy nomination in the “Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series” category for this role March 22, 2017. Nichols has also released two music albums. Down to Earth which is a collection of standards released in 1967, during the original run of Star Trek and Out of This World, released in 1991, which is more rock oriented and is themed around Star Trek and space exploration.

F. W. Murnau

Regarded as one of the most influential German film directors of the silent era, the German film director Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau was born 28th December 1888. He was also a prominent figure in the expressionist movement in German cinema during the 1920s.Born in Bielefeld, Murnau was greatly influenced by Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Shakespeare, and Ibsen plays he had seen at the age of 12, and made friends with director Max Reinhardt. Murnau also served as a company commander at the eastern front during World War I, surviving several crashes without any injuries.

Murnau’s best known work was his 1922 film NOSFERATU an adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Although not a commercial success due to copyright issues with Stoker’s novel, the film was a considered a masterpiece of Expressionist artwork. He was also known for his work with the 1924 film The Last Laugh and his interpretation of Goethe’s Faust (1926). He later emigrated to Hollywood in 1926, where he joined the Fox Studio and made three films, including Sunrise (1927), Four Devils (1928) and City Girl (1930).Murnau travelled to Bora Bora to make the film Tabu in 1931 with documentary film pioneer Robert Flaherty, who left after artistic disputes with Murnau who had to finish the movie on his own. A week prior to the opening of the film Tabu, Murnau died in a Santa Barbara, California, hospital on March 11, 1931, from injuries he received in an automobile accident that occurred along the Pacific Coast Highway near Rincon Beach, south of Santa Barbara.Although some of Murnau’s films have been lost, most still survive.

NOSFERATU
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KO5mMVeFZEQ