Rudyard Kipling

English short-story writer, poet, and novelist Joseph Rudyard Kipling Was born 30 December 1865 in Bombay. However He moved to London, England when he was five years old. In 1891, Kipling visited South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and India. However, he cut short his visit and returned to London where his first novel was published Kipling is best known for his works of fiction, including The Jungle Book (a collection of stories which includes “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”), Just So Stories (1902), Kim (1901) (a tale of adventure), many short stories, including “The Man Who Would Be King” (1888); and his poems, including “Mandalay” (1890), “Gunga Din” (1890), “The White Man’s Burden” (1899), and “If—” (1910). He was also acquainted with British writer Arthur Conan Doyle, who gave Kipling an extended golf lesson which he enjoyed.

Kipling also loved the outdoors especially Autumn in Vermont, describing how a Maple began changing colour, flaming blood-red of a sudden against the dark green of a pine-belt. Next morning there was an answering signal from the swamp and Three days later, the hill-sides as fast as the eye could range were afire, and the roads paved, with crimson and gold. Then a wet wind blew, until nothing remained but pencil-shadings of bare boughs, and one could see into the most private heart of the woods. Sadly On a visit to the United States in 1899, Kipling and Josephine developed pneumonia, from which she eventually died. Kipling began collecting material for another of his children’s classics, Just So Stories for Little Children, this was published in 1902, the year after Kim. In 1906 Kipling wrote the song “Land of our Birth, We Pledge to Thee” and two science fiction short stories, With the Night Mail (1905) and As Easy As A. B. C (1912), both set in the 21st century in Kipling’s Aerial Board of Control universe. In 1907 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature and he published two connected poetry and story collections: Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906), and Rewards and Fairies (1910). Which contained the poem “If”.

KiplingDuring the First World War Kipling was an active patriot and wrote political pamphlets and poems which enthusiastically supported the UK’s war aims of restoring Belgium after being occupied by Germany. He also actively encouraged his young son John to go to war. Tragically Though John was killed in the First World War, at the Battle of Loos in September 1915, at age 18. After having been rejected twice And who only managed to enlist due to the intervention of Lord Roberts, commander-in-chief of the British Army, and colonel of the Irish Guards, with whom Rudyard had been friends and his body was not found until 1992. In September 1914, Kipling was asked by the British government to write propaganda, an offer that he immediately accepted. Kipling’s pamphlets and stories were very popular with the British people during the war with his major themes being glorifying the British military as the place for heroic men to be, German atrocities against Belgian civilians and the stories of women being brutalized by a horrific war unleashed by Germany, yet surviving and triumphing in spite of their suffering. Kipling was enraged by reports of the Rape of Belgium together with the sinking of the RMS Lusitania in 1915, which he saw as a deeply inhumane act, which led him to see the war as a crusade for civilization against barbarism. Kipling was deeply critical of the British Army as opposed to the war itself, which he ardently supported, complaining as early as October 1914 that Germany should have been defeated by now, and something must be wrong with the British Army. he was also appalled by the heavy losses, blaming the entire pre-war generation of British politicians, for not learning lessons from the Boer war, resulting in heavy casualties in France and Belgium.

After the first world war, Kipling remained skeptical about the Fourteen Points and the League of Nations, but he admired Theodore Roosevelt and hoped that the post-war world would be dominated by an Anglo-French-American alliance, but was saddened by Roosevelt’s death in 1919. Kipling joined Sir Fabian Ware’s Imperial War Graves Commission (now the Commonwealth War Graves Commission), who were responsible for the garden like British War Graves dotted along the Western Front. He also chose the biblical phrases “Their Name Liveth For Evermore” (Ecclesiasticus 44.14, KJV) found on the Stones of Remembrance in larger war graves, “Known unto God” for the gravestones of unidentified servicemen and “The Glorious Dead” on the Cenotaph, Whitehall, London. In 1923 he published a two-volume history of the Irish Guards, which is considered to be one of the finest examples of regimental history. He also published the moving short story, “The Gardener”, which depicts visits to the war cemeteries, and the poem “The King’s Pilgrimage” (1922) about King George V’s, tour of the cemeteries and memorials belonging to the Imperial War Graves Commission.

Kipling also became a motoring correspondent for the British press, and wrote enthusiastically of his trips around England and abroad, despite usually being driven by a chauffeur. In 1920 Kipling co-founded the Liberty League with Haggard and Lord Sydenham. promoting classic liberal ideals in response to the rising power of Communist tendencies within Great Britain. In 1922 Kipling, Was asked to assist University of Toronto civil engineering professorHerbert E. T. Haultain to develop a dignified obligation and ceremony for graduating engineering students an produced “The Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer”. Today, engineering graduates all across Canada are presented with an iron ring at the ceremony as a reminder of their obligation to society. In 1922 Kipling also became Lord Rector of St Andrews University in Scotland, a three-year position.

Kipling argued very strongly for an Anglo-French alliance to uphold the peace, and repeatedly warned against revising the Treaty of Versailles in Germany’s favour, predicting it would lead to a new world war, arguing that Germany’s larger economy and birthrate had made that country stronger than France, which had been devastated by the war and suffered heavy losses while Germany was mostly undamaged with a higher birth rate. Kipling also opposed the Labour government of Ramsay MacDonald as “Bolshevism without bullets”, and believed that Labour was a Communist front organisation which took instructions from Moscow. Kipling’s admired Benito Mussolini but was against fascism, writing that Sir Oswald Mosley was “a bounder and an arriviste”, But by 1935 he was calling Mussolini a deranged and dangerous egomaniac writing that “The Hitlerites are out for blood”. In 1934 he published a short story in Strand Magazine, “Proofs of Holy Writ”, Suggesting that William Shakespeare had helped to polish the prose of the King James Bible Less than one year before his death And gave a speech (titled “An Undefended Island”) to the Royal Society of St George on 6 May 1935 warning of the danger which Nazi Germany posed to Britain.

Kipling sadly died 18 January 1936 at the age of 70 after Suffering a haemorrhage in his small intestine following surgery, for a perforated duodenal ulcer. He died two days before King George V. And was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, northwest London, and his ashes were buried in Poets’ Corner, In the South Transept of Westminster Abbey, next to Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy.

Christina Rosetti

English poet Christina Georgina Rosetti sadly died on 29 December 1894. She was born 5 December 1830, She wrote a variety of romantic, devotional, and children’s poems, including Goblin Market, Remember, and the words of the Christmas carol “In the Bleak Midwinter”. Rossetti was educated at home by her mother, who had her study religious works, classics, fairy tales and novels. Rossetti enjoyed the works of Keats, Scott, Ann Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis. The influence of the work of Dante Alighieri, Petrarch and other Italian writers had a deep impact on Rossetti’s later writing. The family homes in Bloomsbury at 38 and later 50 Charlotte Street were within easy reach of Madam Tussauds, London Zoo and the newly opened Regent’s Park, which she visited regularly, Rossetti was very much a London child, and, it seems, a happy one.

ln the 1840s, her family faced severe financial difficulties due to the deterioration of her father’s physical and mental health. He had Bronchitis, possibly tuberculosis, and faced losing his sight. He gave up his teaching post at King’s College and though he lived another 11 years, he suffered from depression and was never physically well again. So Rossetti’s mother began teaching and Maria became a live-in governess. At this time her brother William was working for the Excise Office and Gabriel was at art school, leading Christina’s life at home to become one of increasing isolation. When she was 14, Rossetti suffered a nervous breakdown and left school. Bouts of depression and related illness followed. She, became deeply interested in theAnglo-Catholic movement that developed in the Church of England. Religious devotion came to play a major role in Rossetti’s life

In her late teens, Rossetti became engaged to the painter James Collinson. like her brothers Dante and William, he was one of the founding members of the avant-garde artistic group, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. The engagement was broken in 1850 when he reverted to Catholicism. Later she became involved with the linguist Charles Cayley, but declined to marry him, also for religious reasons. The third offer came from the painter John Brett, whom she also refused. Rossetti sat for several of Dante Rossetti’s most famous paintings. In 1848, she was the model for the Virgin Mary in his first completed oil painting, The Girlhood of Mary Virgin, which was the first work to be inscribed with the initials ‘PRB’, ( Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood).The following year she modelled again for his depiction of the Annunciation, Ecce Ancilla Domini. A line from her poem “Who shall deliver me?” inspired the famous painting by Fernand Khnopff called “I lock my door upon myself”. In 1849 she became seriously ill again, suffering from depression and also had a major religious crisis.

Rossetti began writing down and dating her poems from 1842, and From 1847 she began experimenting with verse forms such as sonnets, hymns and ballads; drawing narratives from the Bible, folk tales and the lives of the saints. Her early pieces often feature meditations on death and loss. She published her first two poems (“Death’s Chill Between” and “Heart’s Chill Between”), which appeared in the Athenaeum, in 1848 when she was 18. Under the pen-name “Ellen Alleyne”, she contributed to the literary magazine, The Germ, published by the Pre-Raphaelites from January – April 1850 and edited by her brother William. Her most famous collection, Goblin Market and Other Poems, appeared in 1862, when she was 31. It received widespread praise, establishing her as the main female poet of the time. Hopkins, Swinburne and Tennyson lauded her work.Rossetti was hailed as a successor to Elizabeth Barrett Browning. one of Rossetti’s best known works Goblin Market Is about the misadventures of two sisters’ when they encounter goblins.

Rossetti was a volunteer worker from 1859 to 1870 at the St. Mary Magdalene “house of charity” in Highgate, a refuge for former prostitutes and it is suggested Goblin Market may have been inspired by the “fallen women” she came to know.There are parallels with Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner given both poems’ religious themes of temptation, sin and redemption by vicarious suffering. Swinburne in 1883 dedicated his collection A Century of Roundels to Rossetti as she had adopted his roundelform in a number of poems, as exampled by her Wife to Husband She was ambivalent about women’s suffrage, but many scholars have identified feminist themes in her poetry. She was opposed to slavery (in the American South), cruelty to animals (in the prevalent practice of animal experimentation), and the exploitation of girls in under-age prostitution.

Rossetti maintained a very large circle of friends and correspondents and continued to write and publish for the rest of her life, primarily focusing on devotional writing and children’s poetry. In 1892, Rossetti wrote The Face of the Deep, a book of devotional prose, and oversaw the production of a new and enlarged edition ofSing-Song, published in 1893.ln the later decades of her life, Rossetti suffered from Graves Disease, diagnosed in 1872 suffering a nearly fatal attack in the early 1870s. ln 1893, she developed breast cancer and though the tumour was removed, she suffered a recurrence in September 1894. She tragically died in Bloomsbury and Was buried in Highgate Cemetery. The place where she died, in Torrington Square, is marked with a stone table

Holidays and events for 29 December

National Pepper Pot Day

National Pepper Pot day takes place annually on 29 December. National Pepper pot day can trace its origins back to The brutal winter of 1777 – 1778 during the American Revolution, When the Continental Army was fighting for the newly formed country of the United States of America during the Revolutionary War. As they were camped at Valley Forge on December 29th, 1777,

The soldiers were low on food because the farmers in the area had gone and sold all their supplies to the British Army for cash rather than the weak currency that the Continental soldiers could offer them for their crops. Christopher Ludwick, a baker general of the Continental Army, gathered whatever food he could scrounge together to feed the cold and frail soldiers

George Washington asked the army’s chef to prepare a meal that would boost their morale and warm them. The chef was able to find scraps of tripe, meat, and some peppercorn. He then mixed the ingredients together with some other seasonings and created the hot, thick, and spicy soup we now know as Philadelphia Pepper Pot Soup. The meal was well received, and gave the soldiers the warmth and strength that they needed to push the enemies back through the harsh winter weather and It quickly became known as “the soup that won the war.”

Tick Tock Day

Tick Tock day takes place on 29 December and was created by Thomas and Ruth Roy at Wellcat.com. The purpose of Tick Tock day is to remind people that there are only two days are remaining in the year. So if you have any unfinished business that needs to be done in this calendar year or there something big you want to accomplish yet this year, Now is the time to finish up, as the clock is ticking!

Cozy Powell

The late great English rock drummer, Cozy Powell (Colin Flooks) was born 29 December 1947 He made his name with many major rock bands like The Jeff Beck Group, Rainbow, Whitesnake and Black Sabbath. Cozy Powell was born in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England, and started playing drums at age 12 in the school orchestra, thereafter playing along in his spare time to popular singles of the day. The first band he was in, called the Corals, played each week at the youth club in Cirencester. At age 15 he had already worked out an impressive drum solo. The stage name ‘Cozy’ was borrowed from the jazz drummer Cozy Cole.The semi-professional circuit was next, with semi-pro outfit The Sorcerers, a vocal harmony pop band. The late nights and usual on-the-road exploits began to affect his education, and Powell left to take an office job in order to finance the purchase of his first set of Premier drums. The Sorcerers performed in the German club scene of the 1960s.

By 1968 the band had returned to England, basing themselves around Birmingham. Powell struck up friendships with fellow musicians like Robert Plant and John Bonham(both at the time unknowns in Listen), future Slade vocalist Noddy Holder, bassist Dave Pegg and a young Tony Iommi. The Sorcerers now became Youngblood, and a series of singles were released in late 1968–69. The group then linked up with the Move bassist/singer Ace Kefford to form The Ace Kefford Stand. Five recorded tracks are available on the Ace Kefford album ‘Ace The Face’ released by Sanctuary Records in 2003. Powell also began session work. Powell with fellow Sorcerers Dave and Denny Ball formed Big Bertha.powell also played with swamp rocker Tony Joe White at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970. Powell then landed the then highly prestigious drumming job with Jeff Beck’s group in April 1970. Their first project was to record an album of Motown covers in the USA. This was never finished and remains unreleased. After the recording of two albums, Rough and Ready (October 1971) and Jeff Beck Group (July 1972), the band fell apart. ln 1972′

ThinlizzyPowell drummed for two tracks (“Hey Sandy” and “Martha”) on Harvey Andrews’ album Writer of Songs. By late 1972 he had joined up with the Ball brothers and singer Frank Aiello to form Bedlam, whose eponymous album was recorded for Chrysalis and released in August 1973. Eventually Powell abandoned Bedlam to record two singles including “Dance with the Devil”, which reached #3 in the UK singles chart during January 1974. The song was his only solo hit in the United States, peaking at #49. The track featured Suzi Quatro on bass. Powell’s second hit during 1974 was with “The Man in Black”, which reached a respectable #18.Arrows front man Alan Merrill, also a RAK records artist, played electric bass on ‘”The Man In Black’” and the b-side ‘”After Dark.” Jeff Beck’s studio producer was Mickie Most and Powell soon found himself drafted into sessions for artists signed to Most’s RAK label, including Julie Felix, Hot Chocolate, Donovan and Suzi Quatro. To cash in on his chart success the drummer formed Cozy Powell’s Hammer in April 1974. The line-up included Bernie Marsden (guitar), Clive Chamen (bass), Don Airey (keyboards) and Frank Aiello (Bedlam) on vocals. Clive Chamen was replaced on bass by Neil Murray in the band in early 1975 for the RAK Rocks Britain Tour. “Na Na Na” was a UK #10 hit, and another single “Le Souk” was recorded but never released

In 1975 he joined Rainbow. Powell and Ritchie Blackmore were the only constants in the band’s line-up over the next five years, as Blackmore evolved the sound of the band from a neo-classical hard rock to a more commercial AOR sound. Rainbow’s 1979 Down to Earth LP (from which singles “Since You Been Gone” and “All Night Long” are taken) proved to be the band’s most successful album thus far; however, Powell was concerned over the overtly commercial sound. Powell decided to leave Rainbow, although not before they headlined the first ever Monsters of Rock show at Castle Donington, England on 16 August 1980. The festival was Powell’s last show with the band. After Powell left Rainbow he worked with vocalist Graham Bonnet (he too an ex-Rainbow member) on Bonnet’s new project calledGraham Bonnet & The Hooligans, their most notable single being the UK top 10 single “Night Games” (1981), also on Bonnet’s soloLine Up album. For the rest of the 1980s, Powell assumed short-term journeyman roles with a number of major bands — Michael Schenker Group from 1981 to 1982, and Whitesnake from 1982 to 1985. In 1985 he started recording with Phenomena for their first album, which was released in 1986, when he joined up with Keith Emerson and Greg Lake as a member of Emerson, Lake & Powell. Powell worked with Gary Moore in 1989, followed by stints with Black Sabbath from 1988 to 1991, and again in 1994–1995.

Between late 1992 and early 1993, Powell put together an occasional touring band using the old band name ‘Cozy Powell’s Hammer’ featuring himself on drums, Neil Murray on bass, Mario Parga on guitar and Tony Martin on vocals and occasional rhythm guitar/synth module. The band performed throughout Europe and appeared on German television. Powell along with Neil Murray were members of Brian May’s band, playing on the Back to the Light and Another World albums. Cozy played with May opening for Guns N’ Roses on the second American leg of their Use Your Illusion tour in 1993. The duo also served a spell with blues guitarist Peter Green in the mid-nineties. Cozy’s last recording session was for Colin Blunstone’s The Light Inside, alongside Don Airey, which was released shortly after Cozy’s death. Prior to his death in 1998, Cozy had pulled out of a tour with Swedish guitarist Yngwie Malmsteen due to an injury and was preparing to tour with Brian May. The final solo album by Cozy Powell Especially for You was released in 1998 after his death, and featured American vocalist John West, Neil Murray, Lonnie Park, Michael Casswell and others. Powell had a fascination with fast cars and motorbikes, and raced for Hitachi on the UK saloon car circuit for a few months. He made headlines, when he appeared on the BBC children’s programme Record Breakers, where he set a world record for the most drums played in under one minute, live on television.

Powell sadly died on 5 April 1998 following a car accident while driving his Saab 9000 at 104 mph (167 km/h) in bad weather on the M4 motorway near Bristol.Powell was dating a married woman who phoned him on 5 April 1998 and asked him to come quickly to her house which was approximately 35 miles away. As he was making the drive to her house she phoned him again and asked “Where are you?” He informed her he was on his way and then she heard him say “Oh shit!” followed by a loud bang.Powell was ejected through the windshield and died at the scene . at the time of the crash Powell’s blood-alcohol reading was over the legal limit, and he was not wearing a seatbelt, in addition to talking with his girlfriend on his mobile phone. The official investigation also found evidence of a slow puncture in a rear tyre. It was suggested, that this could well have caused a sudden collapse of the tyre with a consequent loss of control of the car.He was living at Lambourn in Berkshire at the time and had returned to the studio shortly before his death to record with Fleetwood Mac co-founder Peter Green. At the time of death Cozy had recently had to pull out of tour rehearsals with Yngwie Malmsteen, having suffered an injury in a motorcycle accident. During his career Powell had been the drummer on at least 66 albums with minor contributions on many other recordings. Many rock drummers have cited him as a major influence.