Konstantin Stanislavski

Seminal Russian theatre practitioner Konstantin Sergeievich Stanislavski was born 17 January 1863. He was widely recognised as an outstanding character actor and the many productions that he directed garnered him a reputation as one of the leading theatre directors of his generation. His principal fame and influence, however, rests on his ‘system’ of actor training, preparation, and rehearsal technique.

Stanislavski (his stage name) performed and directed as an amateur until the age of 33, when he co-founded the world-famous Moscow Art Theatre (MAT) company with Vladimir Nemirovich-Danchenko, following a legendary 18-hour discussion. Its influential tours of Europe (1906) and the US (1923—4) and its landmark productions of The Seagull (1898) and Hamlet (1911—12) established his reputation and opened new possibilities for the art of the theatre. By means of the MAT, Stanislavski was instrumental in promoting the new Russian drama of his day—principally the work of Anton Chekhov, Maxim Gorky, and Mikhail Bulgakov—to audiences in Moscow and around the world; he also staged acclaimed productions of a wide range of classical Russian and European plays.

He collaborated with the director and designer Edward Gordon Craig and was formative in the development of several other major practitioners, including Vsevolod Meyerhold (whom Stanislavski considered his “sole heir in the theatre”), Yevgeny Vakhtangov, and Michael Chekhov. At the MAT’s 30-year anniversary celebrations in 1928, a massive heart attack on-stage put an end to his acting career (though he waited until the curtain fell before seeking medical assistance).

He continued to direct, teach, and write about acting until his death On 7 August 1938 a few weeks before the publication of the first volume of his life’s great work, the acting manual An Actor’s Work (1938). He was awarded the Order of the Red Banner and the Order of Lenin and was one of the first to be granted the title of People’s Artist of the USSR. Stanislavski wrote that “there is nothing more tedious than an actor’s biography” and that “actors should be banned from talking about themselves”. At the request of a US publisher, however, he reluctantly agreed to write his autobiography, My Life in Art (first published in English in 1924 and in a revised, Russian-language edition in 1926), though its account of his artistic development is not always accurate. Two English-language biographies have also been posthumously published: David Magarshack’s Stanislavsky: A Life (1950) and Jean Benedetti’s Stanislavski: His Life and Art (1988, revised and expanded 1999) and his legacy remains an influential part of theatre.

Richard Burns

Former English rally driver Richard Burns was Born in Reading, Berkshire on 17 January 1971. He started driving at the age of eight, in his father’s old Triumph 2000. At eleven Burns joined the Under 17 Car Club, where he became driver of the year in 1984. Two years later Burns drove a Ford Escort at Churchill’s Welsh Forest Rally School near Newtown, Powys for the day and from that moment on he knew what he wanted to do. He joined the Craven Motor Club in Reading where his talent was spotted by rally enthusiast David Williams. In 1988 he entered his first rallies in his own Talbot Sunbeam. The car was too basic to make much impression and in 1989 he had to borrow other competitors cars in order to progress, he also rallied the stages of Panaround, Bagshot, Mid-Wales, Millbrook, Severn Valley, Kayel Graphics and the Cambrian Rally. In 1990 he joined the Peugeot Challenge in a Peugeot 205 GTI & got his first taste of a World Rally Championship event in Great Britain as a prize for winning the Peugeot Challenge that year. In 1991 Burns met Robert Reid,who became his co-driver for the next 12 years. For 1992 Williams bought Burns a Group N Subaru Legacy and with the support of Prodrive won the National Championship. Prodrive saw him as a promising driver for the future.In 1993 he joined the Subaru Rally Team for the British Rally Championship alongside Alister McRae, driving a Subaru Legacy. He won four rounds, the Vauxhall Sport, Pirelli, Scottish, and Manx International, and became the youngest ever British Champion. He finished seventh on that year’s snowy RAC Rally.

In the wake of his 1993 success, Burns remained with Subaru for the 1994 and 1995 seasons, contesting the Asia Pacific Rally Championship, which included the New Zealand and Australia Rallies, and also his home WRC round. His best result was third on the 1995 RAC Rally, behind team mates Carlos Sainz and winner and world champion Colin McRae. During 1996 he drove for Mitsubishi Ralliart at international level, winning the 1996 Rally New Zealand in a Mitsubishi Lancer Evo . In 1998, he won the Safari Rally, piloting a Mitsubishi Lancer Evo. He also won that year’s Rally Great Britain & the constructors’ Championship went to Mitsubishi.Burns moved to the Prodrive-run Subaru World Rally Team under David Richards for the 1999 season, joining Juha Kankkunen and Bruno Thiry as part of the factory team driving Subaru Impreza WRCs, replacing Colin McRae. Burns worked his way to a career high of second place in the drivers’ standings. He also led Subaru to second in the constructors’ series behind the Toyota team. He was a long-time contender for the title in 2000, but crashed out on the Rally Finland in mid-season handing the championship to Marcus Grönholm who had been competing in his first year as a full-time factory driver. Sadly Burns failed to finish the 2001 Monte Carlo Rally or the 2001 Swedish Rally, although he finished Fourth in Portugal and second in Argentina and Cyprus behind Ford’s Colin McRae. Burns won his first and only individual rally victory of the season in New Zealand, Burns then finished second on the Rally Australia. Burns’ finished the 2001 Rally of Great Britain in third place behind Peugeot duo Marcus Gronholm and Harri Rovanpera after his two main rivals for the Championship,Carlos Sainz and Colin Mcrea both crashed out enabling him to become the first Englishman to win the World Rally Championship. When Richard passed the finishing line at the final stage of the final rally in 2001, Burns uttered words thought to be paying tribute to his codriver Robert Reid: “You’re the best in the world”.

To commemorate the title success, Subaru produced a special edition of the Subaru Impreza in the UK called the RB5. Burns joined Peugeot for the 2002 season, but could not match the pace of team-mates Marcus Grönholm and Gilles Panizzi . Burns rejoined Subaru, for the 2004 season. However, In November 2003 Burns suffered a blackout while driving with Ford driver Markko Märtin to the rally. He was withdrawn from the event and was later diagnosed with an astrocytoma, a type of malignant brain tumour. He had Treatment during 2004 followed by surgery in April 2005 which was described as “very successful”. However the tumour could not be completely destroyed. On August 2005 a fan day was made, where his fans were invited to see his private car collection, but he was unable to drive himself so his co-driver Robert Reid drove his private cars on his behalf.Late on Friday, November 25, 2005, four years to the day after winning the World Rally Championship, Burns died in Westminster, London, aged 34, after having been in a coma for some days as a result of a brain tumour.

A memorial service for Burns was held at St Luke’s Church, Chelsea on Thursday 22 December 2005, with readings from BBC TV’s Jeremy Clarkson and Steve Rider, and a tribute paid by one of Burns’ closest friends, photographer Colin McMaster. Subaru also paid tribute to Burns at Castle Combe in 2006, when over 50 Subaru Impreza RB5s took to the track, including the RB5 number #001 driven by Alex Burns, Richard’s father. During the 2006 Goodwood Festival of Speed, a charity was founded in his name with a purpose to “inspire and support people with serious injury and illness”, named RB Foundation. The foundation also raises money for the Michael Park Fund, which deals with improving safety in motorsport events.Subaru released a special edition Impreza WRX STI in 2007 – the RB320 – in memory of Burns

Mick Taylor (Bluesbreakers, Rolling Stones)

Mick Taylor, British musician with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and Ex bass player for the The Rolling Stones was born 17th January 1949. The Rolling Stones were formed in London in 1962 When Keith Richards and Mick Jagger who were childhood friends and classmates, discovered that they shared a common intereest in the music of Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters. leading to the formation of a band with Dick Taylor (later of Pretty Things). Richards, Taylor, and Jagger found Brian Jones as he sat in playing slide guitar with Alexis Korner’s R&B band, Blues Incorporated,which also had two other future members of the Rolling Stones: Ian Stewart and Charlie Watts

On 12 July 1962 the band played their first gig at the Marquee Club, with Jagger, Richards and Jones, along with Stewart on piano, and Mick Taylor on bass. Bassist Bill Wyman joined in December 1962 and drummer Charlie Watts the following January 1963 to form the band’s long-standing rhythm section. Their first single, was a cover of Chuck Berry’s “Come On” and their second single, was “I Wanna Be Your Man”, Their third single, Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away”. The band’s second UK LP – The Rolling Stones No. 2, yielded the singles “The Last Time”, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Get Off of My Cloud”. The third album “Aftermath” was released in 1966, contained the singles “Paint It Black”, the ballad “Lady Jane” “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow?” “Goin’ Home” and “Under My Thumb”. 1967 saw the release of “Between the Buttons”, which included the double A-side single “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Ruby Tuesday”, and the release of the Satanic Majesties Request LP. the next album, Beggars Banquet was an eclectic mix of country and blues-inspired tunes,featuring the singles “Street Fighting Man” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “Sympathy for the Devil. The Stones next album Let It Bleed featured the song “Gimmie Shelter”, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” “Midnight Rambler” and “Love in Vain”. The next album Sticky Finger was released in 1971.and featured an elaborate cover design by Andy Warhol, and contains the hits, “Brown Sugar”, and “Wild Horses”. The Stones classic double album, Exile on Main St. was released in May 1972. their follow-up album Goats Head Soup, featured the hit “Angie”. Their next album was 1974′s It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll.

sg-rsthe band’s next album Some Girls, included the hit single “Miss You”, the country ballad “Far Away Eyes”, “Beast of Burden”, and “Shattered” their next albums Emotional Rescue and Tattoo You were both released in 1980 and featured the single “Start Me Up”. in 1982 the Rolling Stones toured Europe to commemorate their 20th anniversary and released their next album Undercover in late 1983. In 1986′s the album Dirty Work was released,which contained the song “Harlem Shuffle”.The next album “Steel Wheels” included the singles “Mixed Emotions”, “Rock and a Hard Place”, “Almost Hear You Sigh” and “Continental Drift”. their next studio album 1994′s Voodoo Lounge,went double platinum in the US. and went on to win the 1995 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album.The Rolling Stones ended the 1990s with the album Bridges to Babylon which was released in 1997. In 2002, the band released Forty Licks, a greatest hits double album, to mark their forty years as a band. On 12th November 2012 The Rolling Stones released the album Grrrr to celebrate their 50th anniversary and have also made a documentary called Crossfire Hurricane.

The Rolling Stones are one of the of the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed acts in the history of popular music and In early 1989, the Rolling Stones, including Mick Taylor, Ronnie Wood and Ian Stewart (posthumously), were inducted into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Q magazine also named them one of the “50 Bands To See Before You Die”, and popular consensus has accorded them the title of the “World’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band.” Rolling Stone magazine ranked them 4th on their “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list.

Anne Brontë

British novelist and poet Anne Brontë was born 17 January 1820. The daughter of a poor Irish clergyman in the Church of England, Anne Brontë was the youngest member of the Brontë literary family and lived most of her life with her family at the parish of Haworth on the Yorkshire moors. For a couple of years she went to a boarding school. At the age of 19 she left Haworth and worked as a governess between 1839 and 1845. After leaving her teaching position, she fulfilled her literary ambitions. She wrote a volume of poetry with her sisters (Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell, 1846) and two novels. Agnes Grey, based upon her experiences as a governess, was published in 1847. Her second and last novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which is considered to be one of the first sustained feminist novels, appeared in 1848. Anne’s life was cut short when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis at the age of 29.Mainly because the re-publication of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was prevented by Charlotte Brontë after Anne’s death on 28 May 1849, she is less known than her sisters Charlotte, author of four novels including Jane Eyre, and Emily, author of Wuthering Heights. However her novels, like those of her sisters, have become classics of English literature.

Agnes Grey is the debut novel of English author Anne Brontë, and is largely based on Anne Brontë’s own experiences as a governess for five years. Like her sister Charlotte’s novel Jane Eyre. It follows Agnes Grey, the daughter of a minister, whose family comes to financial ruin. Desperate to earn money to care for herself, she takes one of the few jobs allowed to respectable women in the early Victorian era, as a governess to the children of the wealthy. As a governess, she works in several bourgeois families including the Bloomfields and the Murrays The novel addresses what the precarious position of governess entailed and the trouble that affects a young woman who must try to rein in unruly, spoiled children for a living, and about the ability of wealth and status to destroy social values. The novel also deals with issues of oppression and abuse of women and governesses, isolation, ideas of empathy and the fair treatment of animals. After her father’s death Agnes opens a small school with her mother and finds happiness with a man who loves her for herself. By the end of the novel they have three children, Edward, Agnes and Mary.

Anne Brontë’s second and final novel was The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which is considered to be one of the first sustained feminist novels and was an instant success. The novel is framed as a letter from Gilbert Markham to his friend and brother-in-law about the events leading to his meeting his wife. It concerns A mysterious young widow named Mrs. Helen Graham who arrives at, an Elizabethan mansion named Wildfell Hall, which has been empty for many years, with her young son and servant. She lives there under an assumed name, Helen Graham in strict seclusion, and becomes a source of curiosity for the small community, gradually the reticent Mrs Graham and her young son Arthur are drawn into the social circles of the village. Initially, Gilbert Markham casually courts Eliza Millward, despite his mother’s belief that he can do better. His interest in Eliza wanes as he comes to know Mrs. Graham. In retribution, Eliza spreads (and perhaps creates) scandalous rumours about Helen.

very soon Helen finds herself the victim of local slander. Refusing to believe anything scandalous about her, Gilbert Markham, a young farmer, discovers her dark secrets. about her marriage to Arthur Huntingdon. a handsome, witty chap who is also spoilt, selfish, and self-indulgent, whom she marries blinded by love and resolves to reform with gentle persuasion and good example. Upon the birth of their child, Huntingdon becomes increasingly jealous of their son (also called Arthur) and his claims on Helen’s attentions and affections. Meanwhile Huntingdon’s dissolute friends lead him astray by frequently engage in drunken revels at the family’s home, Grassdale, oppressing those of finer character. Both men and women are portrayed as degraded, The novel deals with her husband’s physical and moral decline through alcohol and the world of debauchery and cruelty. Not surprisingly Helen decides she’s had enough and flee’s with her son, eventually arriving at Wildfell Hall….

Both Tenent of Wildfell Hall and Agnes Grey have been adapted for film and Television and the novels remain popular.

Benjamin Franklin Day

American polymath Benjamin Franklin FRS FRSE was born January 17, 1706. He is considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, humorist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions. He founded many civic organizations, including the Library Company, Philadelphia’s first fire department and the University of Pennsylvania.

Franklin earned the title of “The First American” for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity, initially as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies. As the first United States Ambassador to France, he exemplified the emerging American nation. Franklin was foundational in defining the American ethos as a marriage of the practical values of thrift, hard work, education, community spirit, self-governing institutions, and opposition to authoritarianism both political and religious, with the scientific and tolerant values of the Enlightenment. In the words of historian Henry Steele Commager, “In a Franklin could be merged the virtues of Puritanism without its defects, the illumination of the Enlightenment without its heat.” To Walter Isaacson, this makes Franklin “the most accomplished American of his age and the most influential in inventing the type of society America would become.

Franklin became a successful newspaper editor and printer in Philadelphia, the leading city in the colonies, publishing the Pennsylvania Gazette at the age of 23. He became wealthy publishing this and Poor Richard’s Almanack, which he authored under the pseudonym “Richard Saunders”. After 1767, he was associated with the Pennsylvania Chronicle, a newspaper that was known for its revolutionary sentiments and criticisms of British policies.

He pioneered and was first president of Academy and College of Philadelphia which opened in 1751 and later became the University of Pennsylvania. He organized and was the first secretary of the American Philosophical Society and was elected president in 1769. Franklin became a national hero in America as an agent for several colonies when he spearheaded an effort in London to have the Parliament of Great Britain repeal the unpopular Stamp Act. An accomplished diplomat, he was widely admired among the French as American minister to Paris and was a major figure in the development of positive Franco-American relations. His efforts proved vital for the American Revolution in securing shipments of crucial munitions from France.

He was promoted to deputy postmaster-general for the British colonies in 1753, having been Philadelphia postmaster for many years, and this enabled him to set up the first national communications network. During the revolution, he became the first United States Postmaster General. He was active in community affairs and colonial and state politics, as well as national and international affairs. From 1785 to 1788, he served as governor of Pennsylvania. He initially owned and dealt in slaves but, by the 1750s, he argued against slavery from an economic perspective and became one of the most prominent abolitionists.

Benjamin Franklin sadly died April 17, 1790, however His colorful life and legacy of scientific and political achievement, and his status as one of America’s most influential Founding Fathers, have seen Franklin honored more than two centuries after his death on coinage and the $100 bill, warships, and the names of many towns, counties, educational institutions, and corporations, as well as countless cultural references.

Other National Holidays and Events happening on 17 January

Palomares Hydrogen Bomb Accident Day
Benjamin Franklin Day
Cable Car Day
Ditch New Year’s Resolution Day
Hot-Buttered Rum Day
Kid Inventors’ Day
National Hot Heads Chili Day

The Chestnut man by Søren Sveistrup

Having Read Jo Nesbø and Steig Larsson, I would like to read The Chestnut Man by Soren Sveistrup a Chilling, dark, Psychological thriller. It is set in Copenhagen and is part police procedural, part psychological thriller. It starts with a serial killer running rampant in present day Copenhagen. Naia Thulin is a detective in Homicide’s Murder Squad led by Nylander, feeling that her workload has barely challenged her abilities, she wants more and has plans to transfer to NC3 (National Cyber Crime Centre). She is a single mother, with a daughter Le.

Mark Hess has been pushed out of Europol after issues, and lands in the Murder Squad, not wanting to be there, with every intention of being reinstated in Europol as soon as possible. He is partnered with Thulin, who has her eyes on a future out of the murder squad, while Hess, with a traumatised past initially has little interest in the case.

The detectives find themselves on a brutal murder scene where a 37 year old mother, Laura Kjaer, has been horrifically killed with her amputated hand missing, and left at the scene is a chestnut man. Elsewhere A still grieving Rosa Hartung is returning to her post as politician and Minister for Social Affairs in the government after the disappearance of her 12 year old daughter, Kristine, a year ago. Linus Bekker confessed to and is sectioned in a psychiatric facility for her murder, although his memory of the act was poor but evidence suggests the conviction is secure.

Rosa finds herself plunged into fresh turmoil when fingerprints on the chestnut man at the murder scene are identified as being that of Kristine. Additionally, Rosa is receiving disturbing death threats. As further murders occur with a similar MO of mothers with children with the signature chestnut men with Kristine’s fingerprints, the police struggle to find any leads whilst the serial killer runs rings around them. Hess and Thulin are then ordered to ignore the Hartung connection, despite the fact it seems to be critical to the investigation.

Gradually Hess becomes obsessed with the case and decides to get to the bottom of the heinous murders being committed. Thulin discovers that Hess is a dedicated and effective detective who challenges the perceptions of the case, dogged in his determination to find the killer and willing to enter forbidden territory.

Richard Hawley (Pulp, Longpigs)

English guitarist, singer-songwriter and producer Richard Willis Hawley was born 17 January 1967 in Sheffield, Hawley grew up in a working-class area of the city with two sisters. Both his parents were musicians, his father David a guitarist with a number of local bands, and his mother Lynne a singer. They divorced when he was 16 years old. He noted that “I always wrote songs since childhood” and realising that “you could actually make something up of your own was quite a big one then” He attended Hucklow Middle School together with future Pulp bassist Steve Mackey, and passed his O-levels. Hawley briefly worked at the local HMV

While still at school, Hawley formed the Treebound Story and at the age of 19 recorded a Peel Session together with the band. AfterTreebound Story broke up, Hawley found success as a member of Britpop band Longpigs in the 1990s. As a member of the Longpigs, Hawley released two albums, The Sun Is Often Out and Mobile Home. After the Longpigs broke up in 2000, he later joined the band Pulp, led by his friend Jarvis Cocker, for a short time. During his time with both bands he was able to “quietly hone” his songwriting skills. Impressed by a home demo of his songs, both Cocker and Mackey urged Hawley to record the material. He used some left-over studio time to demo material and to experiment. He recorded a song per day, recording most of the instruments himself “with a boom mike in the middle so I could walk between instruments. His eponymous debut was a mini-album was released in 2001 and featured seven songs Including the songs “Sunlight” and “Coming Home”. He was assisted by former Longpigs drummer Andy Cook and Colin Elliot, who became his long-term producer.

In 2001, Hawley released the album Late Night Final, named after the cry of vendors selling the Sheffield Star evening newspaper on the streets of the city and included the songs “Baby, You’re My Light”,”The Nights Are Cold. In 2003 Hawley released the album Lowedges, named after a suburb of the city. The NME called Lowedges the “first great album of 2003” and it topped an end-of-the-year poll held by Virgin Radio. Hawley released his third album, Coles Corner in 2005. Coles Corner eventually gained a nomination for the Mercury Prize in 2006. Alex Turner of the Arctic Monkeys, whose debut album won the prize, exclaimed “Someone call 999, Richard Hawley’s been robbed!” Hawley’s 2007 album Lady’s Bridge was named after a bridge in the centre of the city. He also embarked on a 16-date tour to promote the album. Sadly In 2007 Hawley’s father died after a long illness and Setanta’s self-titled debut was rereleased in 2007 with five additional tracks Including the song ‘Troublesome Waters’ which is a cover of a Howard Seratt song and it’s the only time Hawley and his dad featured together on a published recording. He plays rhythm guitar”.

In 2008, Hawley was nominated for his first solo Brit Award for Best British Male Performe and was a headlining act at the 2008 Festival Internacional de Benicàssim in Spain. Hawley also produced, with Colin Elliot, and contributed two songs to the album Made in Sheffield, a compilation of songs by the Sheffield-based songwriters for Tony Christie. Richard Hawley released his fifth album Truelove’s Gutter, in 2009 and it won the Mojo record of the year. In 2009 The song “Don’t Get Hung Up in Your Soul” was chosen as the Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week and “Open Up Your Door” was featured as the soundtrack song to the Häagen-Dazs ice cream TV commercial in the UK. The song “Tonight The Streets Are Ours” was chosen as the title track for the Oscar nominated 2010 Banksy film Exit Through the Gift Shop and His 2011 song “There’s a Storm Coming” was used at the end of the film Brighton Rock. The song “You And I” by Richard Hawley and The Death Ramps (aka Arctic Monkeys), was also released as the B-side of the Arctic Monkeys’ single “Black Treacle” on 2012.

Richard Hawley released his sixth solo album Standing at the Sky’s Edge, in 2012 Containing the singles, “Leave Your Body Behind You”, “Down In The Woods”, “Seek It” and “Don’t Stare At The Sun”. The four singles were collected on vinyl for the Singles Club box set. Standing at the Sky’s Edge was nominated for the 2012 Mercury Awards. Hawley also featured in a BBC6 Music live broadcast with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, which took place at the Magna Science Park, Rotherham. In 2013 he joined Cocker and Kami Thompson on the Bright Phoebus Revisited UK Tour. Hawley also provided vocals for the title track of the Manic Street Preachers album, Rewind The Film, released in 2013. In 2014, his previous record company, Setanta, re-released the first three albums both on vinyl and CD. He also contributed music to the documentary film Love Is All. In 2015, Hawley released his seventh album Hollow Meadows.

Richard Hawley has also colaborated with many other musicians; In 2002, Hawley produced the debut single “So Young” by Sheffield band Hoggboy, co-produced the band’s two albums Or 8? and Seven Miles Of Love, co-wrote second album track “Hello”, and also played on a cover version of Little Walter’s “Come Back Baby”/ “Believe”. Hawley also produced material by lead singer Tom Hogg’s next band The Hosts. Praise from R.E.M.’s Mike Mills led to him being approached to support the group on several concert dates in 2005. After contributing to Nancy Sinatra’s 2004 self-titled album, Hawley supported her on a European tour in 2005 and duetted with her on several of the tours concerts. In 2007 Hawley provided vocals for “Bad Woman”, a B-side to Arctic Monkeys’ single “Teddy Picker”. He also co-wrote and provided vocals and guitar to the song “The Fix” on Elbow’s Mercury Prize-winning 2008 album The Seldom Seen Kid. Hawley also performed the song with the band at the Glastonbury Festival in June 2008, on The Culture Show in June 2008, at Elbow’s homecoming gigs in Manchester, Wembley Arena, Blackpool’s Empress Ballroom and at the MEN Arena.

In 2009 He reprised his collaboration with Elbow for a special recording of The Seldom Seen Kid with the BBC Concert Orchestra at Abbey Road Studios, which was subsequently released as a special edition CD and DVD set titled The Seldom Seen Kid Live at Abbey Road. He also appeared with Elbow during their 2011 UK TOUR. Hawley’s song “Baby, You’re My Light” was included on the CD soundtrack for the 2008 film Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Hawley himself made an appearance in the 2007 film Flick. In 2009, Hawley was joined on stage by Lisa Marie Presley in London for an encore, she sang vocals on a song the pair have been working on called “Weary” Presley and Hawley also collaborated on Her 2012 album, Storm & Grace. In 2012 Hawley worked again with Arctic Monkeys providing vocals for the “Black Treacle”‘s B-side, “You And I”.

As a solo musician, Hawley has released seven studio albums. Hawley has also worked with several musicians, including Hank Marvin, A Girl Called Eddy, and Jarvis Cocker (and his Relaxed Muscle project). He played the guitar solo on All Saints’ cover version of “Under the Bridge”. He has also been nominated for a Mercury prize twice and once for a Brit Award. He has collaborated with Lisa Marie Presley, Arctic Monkeys, Manic Street Preachers and Paul Weller