Posted in books

The last thing she told me by Linda Green

The last thing she told me by Linda Green is an emotionally-charged and haunting mystery suspense novel from Linda Green, the bestselling author of While My Eyes Were Closed and After I’ve Gone. It tells the story of four generations of women from the same family who are linked by secrets and shame from the past.

It concerns Mother of two Nicola and It begins moments before Nicola’s grandmother Betty dies. Betty tells her that there are babies at the bottom of the garden. Nicola thinks she must have been talking about her fairy statues. However on the day of the funeral, Nicola’s youngest daughter Maisie makes a disturbing discovery while playing in Betty’s Garden which suggests something sinister has actually taken place. Nicola calls the police to investigate but starts to regret it when she realises that unearthing centuries of painful family secrets Could end up tearing her family apart and may unearth even more sinister goings on.

Posted in books

Transcription by Kate Atkinson

Transcription is a thrilling espionage thriller by Kat Atkinson. It begins In 1940, During World War Two. It features eighteen-year old Juliet Armstrong who is reluctantly recruited into the world of espionage. She is Sent to an obscure department of MI5 and tasked with monitoring the comings and goings of British Fascist sympathizers, she discovers the work to be by turns both tedious and terrifying.

When the war ends, she presumes the events of those years have been relegated to the past forever. Now Ten years later Juliet is employed,as a radio producer at the BBC. However She is unexpectedly confronted by figures from her past. A different war is being fought now, on a different battleground, but Juliet finds herself once more under threat. Now her activities during the war have come back to haunt her and A bill of reckoning is due, and she finally begins to realize that there is no action without consequence.

Posted in books

The Missing Sister by Dinah Jefferies

The Missing sister by Dinah Jefferies features a character named Belle Hatton who embarks upon an exciting new life far from home: a glamorous job as a nightclub singer in 1930s Burma, with a host of sophisticated new friends and admirers.

However Belle is haunted by a mystery from the past – a 25 year old newspaper clipping found in her parents’ belongings after their death, saying that the Hattons were leaving Rangoon after the disappearance of their baby daughter, Elvira Belle is desperate to find out what happened to the sister she never knew she had – but when she starts asking questions, she is confronted with unsettling rumours, malicious gossip, and outright threats.

Belle endures riots, intruders, and bomb attacks to find out the truth, Is her sister really dead? And could there be a chance Belle might find her, Belle is determined that nothing will stop her in her mission to uncover the truth. Along the way Belle meets Oliver, an attractive, easy-going American journalist, who promises to help her. However she then receives an anonymous note telling her not to trust those closest to her, and she begins to have doubts about Oliver….

Posted in Events

Purim

The Jewish holiday of Purim commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire from destruction in the wake of a plot by Haman, a story recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther(Megillat Esther). According to the Book of Esther, in the Hebrew Bible, Haman, royal vizier to King Ahasuerus (presumed to be Xerxes I of Persia), planned to kill all the Jews in the empire, but his plans were foiled by Mordecai and his adopted daughter Queen Esther. The day of deliverance became a day of feasting and rejoicing.

Purim is celebrated by giving mutual gifts of food and drink (mishloach manot), giving charity to the poor (mattanot la-evyonim), a celebratory meal (se’udat Purim), and public recitation of the Scroll of Esther (keriat ha-megillah), additions to the prayers and the grace after meals (al hannisim).Other customs include drinking wine, wearing of masks and costumes, and public celebration. Purim is celebrated annually according to the Hebrew calendar on the 14th day of the Hebrew month of Adar (Adar II in leap years), the day following the victory of the Jews over their enemies. In cities that were protected by a surrounding wall at the time of Joshua, Purim is instead celebrated on the 15th of the month on what is known as Shushan Purim, since fighting in the walled city of Shushan continued through the 14th. Today, onlyJerusalem celebrates Purim on the 15th.

Posted in Events

International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on 21 March. Racial discrimination refers to discrimination against individuals on the basis of their race. Policies of racial segregation may formalize it, but it is also often exerted without being legalised and also it means facing injustice.

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination marks the anniversary Of 21st March 1960, when police opened fire and killed 69 people who were at a peaceful demonstration against Apartheid in Sharpeville, South Africa. Proclaiming the day in 1966, the United Nations General Assembly called on the international community to redouble its efforts to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination, and In 1966 the United Nations declared the first Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination to commemorate the protesters who had been killed. This year, celebrations will be marked by two major events in the framework of the International Coalition of Cities against Racism, an initiative launched by UNESCO in March 2004 to establish a network of cities interested in sharing experiences in order to improve their policies to fight racism, discrimination, xenophobia and
Exclusion.

n North America, the Canadian Coalition of Municipalities Against Racism and Discrimination (CCMARD) has officially launched its “Toolkit for Municipalities, Organizations and Citizens”, which provides practical information to support the work of municipalities and their partners in strengthening their local initiatives and policies against racism and discrimination. In Asia, the Coalition of Cities against Discrimination in Asia and the Pacific will hold an International Conference under the theme “Creative Cities for Glocal (Global + Local) Security and Peace”, during the World Human Rights Cities Forum in Gwangju (Republic of Korea) in May.

Posted in Events, Health

World Down Syndrome Day

World Down Syndrome Day is observed on 21 March and has been officially marked by the United Nations since 2012. On this day, people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them throughout the world organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well being of people with Down syndrome. Many of these events are recorded on the official World Down Syndrome Day website. However there is still so much more we can do.Down Syndrome International encourages people all over the World to choose themes, activities and events to help raise awareness of what Down syndrome is, what it means to have Down syndrome, and how people with Down syndrome play a vital role in our lives and communities.

Down syndrome is a naturally occurring chromosomal arrangement that has always been a part of the human condition, being universally present across racial, gender or socio-economic lines, and affecting approximately 1 in 800 live births, although there is considerable variation worldwide. Down syndrome usually causes varying degrees of intellectual and physical disability and associated medical issues. The date for WDSD being the 21st day of the 3rd month, was selected to signify the uniqueness of the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome. The original idea was proposed by members of the European Down Syndrome Association and Down Syndrome International. WDSD was first observed in 2006 in many countries around the world and Down Syndrome Association Singapore launched and hosted the World Down Syndrome Day website from 2006-2010, on behalf of Down Syndrome International, for global activities to be recorded.

Since 2011, Down Syndrome International (DSi) has co-ordinated the World Down Syndrome Day website and the WDSD Global Video Event “Let Us In!” (see 2012 Event “Let Us In – I Want to Learn!”). In 2012, DSi organized the first WDSD Conference held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, USA on 21 March (see 2012 “Building Our Future” Conference) which was sponsored by the Brazilian Mission and Polish Mission to the United Nations, UN Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and UNICEF and was organized in collaboration with the Brazilian Federation of Associations of Down Syndrome, Down España, National Down Syndrome Congress, National Down Syndrome Society, Down Syndrome Research and Treatment Foundation, and Global Down Syndrome Foundation. The Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon also said on 21 March 2012 “On this day, let us reaffirm that persons with Down syndrome are entitled to the full and effective enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Let us each do our part to enable children and persons with Down syndrome to participate fully in the development and life of their societies on an equal basis with others. Let us build an inclusive society for all.” Down Syndrome International also announced that the World Down Syndrome Day Awards would be held every year on 21 March.

Posted in books

World Poetry Day

World Poetry day takes place annually on 21 March. It was created by the United Nations Education Scientific And Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) in 21March 1999 and has been held annually since then, in order to promote reading, writing, publishing an teaching of poetry throughout the world and to “give fresh recognition and impetus to national, regional and international poetry movements” and support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to also offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard within their own communities.

Poetry is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. The word Poetry is derived from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, “making”)

Poetry has a very long history, dating back to prehistorical times with the creation of hunting poetry in Africa, and panegyric and elegiac court poetry was developed extensively throughout the history of the empires of the Nile, Niger and Volta river valleys. Some of the earliest written poetry in Africa can be found among the Pyramid Texts written during the 25th century BCE, while the Epic of Sundiata is one of the most well-known examples of griot court poetry. The earliest Western Asian epic poetry, the Epic of Gilgamesh, was written in Sumerian. Early poems in the Eurasian continent evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient Greek attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle’s Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively informative, prosaic forms of writing.

Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, figures of speech such as metaphor, simile and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm.

Some poetry types are specific to particular cultures and genres and respond to characteristics of the language in which the poet writes. Readers accustomed to identifying poetry with Dante, Goethe, Mickiewicz and Rumi may think of it as written in lines based on rhyme and regular meter; there are, however, traditions, such as Biblical poetry, that use other means to create rhythm and euphony. Much modern poetry reflects a critique of poetic tradition playing with and testing, among other things, the principle of euphony itself, sometimes altogether forgoing rhyme or set rhythm. In today’s increasingly globalized world, poets often adapt forms, styles and techniques from diverse cultures and languages.

World Poetry Day is also meant to support poetry, encourage a return to the oral tradition of poetry recitals, and to promote teaching poetry and restore a dialogue between poetry and the other arts such as theatre, dance, music, painting and so on, it is also designed to support small publishers and create an attractive image of poetry in the media so that the art of poetry will no longer be considered an outdated form of art but one which contributes to creative diversity.

World Poetry Day is also an invitation to reflect on the power of language and the full development of each person’s creative abilities and to encourage the free flow of ideas by word, creativity and innovation by questioning anew our use of words and things, our modes of perception and understanding of the world. Through its associations, its metaphors and its own grammar, and to promote the idea that poetic language is another facet of the dialogue among cultures.

Posted in Events, nature

International Day of Forests

International Day of Forests, observed for the first time on March 21, 2013, was established by resolution of the United Nations General Assembly on November 28, 2012. to be held each year on the 21st day of March. International Day of Forests is intended to be one of the world’s leading global platforms for people with an interest in forests and climate change to share their views, educate the public concerning the importance of forests and work together to ensure forests are suitably incorporated into any future climate change mitigation and adaption strategies.

Each year more than 13 million hectares (32 million acres) of forests are lost, an area roughly the size of England.As go the forests, so go the plant and animal species that they embrace – 80% of all terrestrial biodiversity. Most importantly, forests play a critical role in climate change including global warming: deforestation results in 12-18 percent of the world’s carbon emissions – almost equal to all the CO2 from the global transport sector. equally crucial, healthy forests are one of the world’s primary ‘carbon sinks.Today, forests cover more than 30% of the world’s land and contain more than 60,000 tree species, many as of yet unidentified.forests provide food, fiber, water and medicines for approximately 1.6 billion of the world’s poorest people, including indigenous peoples with unique cultures.

Prior to the launching of International Day of Forests in 2012 were two closely related international commemorations: World Forestry Day (established in 1971 by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization), and Forest Day (convened by the Center for International Forestry Research from 2007-2012). World Forestry Day was established In November 1971, after the “States members” at the 16th session of the Conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization, voted to establish “World Forestry Day” on March 21 of each year. Forest Day was established by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) who convened a series of six Forest Days, in conjunction with annual meetings of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of Parties. CIFOR organized these events on behalf of and in close cooperation with other members of the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF).

The immediate impetus for these events was a casual conversation in Oxford, England, in February 2007, between two scientists who felt the world was underestimating the importance of forests in mitigating carbon emissions and saw a glaring need for the latest forestry research and thinking to inform global policy makers and UNFCCC negotiators. They did not foresee that the conference would become one of the most influential global events on forests and climate change today.

Posted in cars, sport

Ayrton Senna

Generally regarded as one of the greatest F1 drivers to have raced, the Brazilian driver & three-time Formula One world champion Ayrton Senna was born 21 March 1960 in Santana near Sao Paulo. he began his motorsport career in karting, moving up to open-wheel racing in 1981, and winning the British Formula 3 championship in 1983. He made his Formula One debut with Toleman-Hart in 1984 before moving to Lotus-Renault the following year and winning six Grands Prix over the next three seasons. In 1988, he joined Frenchman Alain Prost at McLaren-Honda.
Between them, they won all but one of the 16 Grands Prix that year and Senna his first World Championship. Prost claimed the championship in 1989, and Senna his second and third championships in 1990 and 1991.

In 1992, the Williams-Renault combination began to dominate Formula One. Senna nonetheless managed to finish the 1993 season as runner-up, winning five races and negotiating a move to Williams in 1994. Senna was recognised for his qualifying speed over one lap and from 1989 until 2006 held the record for most pole positions. He was especially quick in wet conditions, as shown by his performances in the 1984 Monaco Grand Prix, the 1985 Portuguese Grand Prix, and the 1993 European Grand Prix.

He also holds the record for most victories at the prestigious Monaco Grand Prix – six – and is the third most successful driver of all time in terms of race wins. Senna courted controversy throughout his career, particularly during his turbulent rivalry with Alain Prost. Both the 1989 Championship won by Prost and the 1990 Championship won by Senna were decided by collisions between them at those years’ Japanese Grands Prix. Sadly though Ayrton Senna was tragically killed on 1st May 1994 at the peak of his career in a crash at Tamburello corner while leading the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix at Imola.

Posted in music

Roger Hodgson (Supertramp)

Roger Hodgson the former lead singer of Supertramp was born 21st March 1950. Supertramp formed in 1969 under the name ”Daddy” before renaming themselves in early 1970. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they have since incorporated a combination of traditional Rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band’s work is marked by the inventive songwriting of Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson, the distinctive voice of Hodgson, and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone in their songs.

IT WAS THE BEST OF TIMES http://youtu.be/SpAT6ruDvbA

While the band’s early work was mainstream progressive rock they would enjoy greater critical and commercial success when they incorporated more conventional and radio-friendly elements into their work in the mid-1970s, going on to sell more than 60 million albums. They reached their peak of commercial success with 1979′s Breakfast in America, which has sold more than 20 million copies.Though their albums were generally far more successful than their singles, Supertramp did enjoy a number of major hits throughout the 1970s and 1980s, including “Bloody Well Right”, “Give a Little Bit”, “The Logical Song”, “Goodbye Stranger”, “Take the Long Way Home”, “Dreamer”, “Breakfast in America”, “It’s Raining Again”, and “Cannonball”. The band attained significant popularity in the United States, Canada, Europe, South Africa and Australia With classic albums like Breakfast in America and It Was the Best of Times. Since Hodgson’s departure in 1983, founder Rick Davies has led the band by himself.