International and National events happening on 12 June

  • Peanut Butter Cookie Day
  • Little League Girls Baseball Day
  • National Jerky Day
  • National Loving Day
  • National Red Rose Day
  • Orlando United Day
  • International Falafel Day
  • Crowded Nest Awareness Day
  • World Day Against Child Labour

Peanut butter cookie Day

Peanut Butter Cookie Day takes place annually on 12 June. Peanut Butter can trace its roots back to the time of the Aztecs and the Incas who were making a paste of peanuts at least 3,500 years ago, but the modern version is claimed by several inventive types, including Dr. John Kellogg, and its popularity became assured by its appearance at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. The Peanut Butter Cookie is even harder to track, but George Washington Carver became a much-sought-after speaker between 1916 and 1933. One of his most frequent topics: the many uses of the peanut.


LITTLE LEAGUE GIRLS BASEBALL DAY

Little League Girls Baseball Day commemorates the occasion of 12 June 1950 when A girl plays an entire season with a team in New York, until the Little League organization institutes a ban on girls in Little League. The ban stays on the books until 1974, when the National Organization for Women (NOW) backs Maria Pepe in a discrimination lawsuit in which the New Jersey Superior Court decides that Little League must allow girls to try out.


LOVING DAY

Loving Day takes place annually on 12 June to commemorate the date of 12 June 1967 when Mildred and Richard Loving were were sentenced to a year in prison for marrying each other, a violation of Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act of 1924, because she is black and he is white. They bring suit, and the U.S. Supreme Court makes a unanimous decision in Loving v. Virginia that the Virginia law is unconstitutional, ending all race-based restriction on marriage in the U.S.


National Jerky Day

National Jerky Day takes place annually on 12 June. It was launched 12 June 2012 by Jack Link’s Beef Jerky. Jerky is lean trimmed meat that has been cut into strips and dried (dehydrated) to prevent spoilage. Normally, this drying includes the addition of salt to prevent bacteria grow before the meat has finished the dehydrating process. The word “jerky” is derived from the Quechua word ch’arki which means “dried, salted meat” however its use is wide-spread, especially in the Andes Mountains of South America, as a staple of travelers. Related to, but not the same as Pemmican, which includes other dried ingredients, like berries, which is a travel food of many North American tribes

All that is needed to produce basic “jerky” is a low-temperature drying method, and salt to inhibit bacterial growth. Modern manufactured jerky is often marinated, prepared with a seasoned spice rub or liquid,or or smoked with low heat (usually under 70 °C/160 °F). Also common in store bough jerky is the use of sweeteners such as brown sugar. Jerky is ready-to-eat, needs no additional preparation and can be stored for months without refrigeration. To ensure maximum shelf life a proper protein to moisture content is required in the final cured product.

Many products which are sold as jerky consist of highly processed, chopped and formed meat rather than traditional sliced whole-muscle meat. These products may contain more fat, but moisture content, like the whole-muscle product, must meet a 0.75 to 1 moisture to protein ratio in the US Chemical preservatives can be used to prevent oxidative spoilage, but the moisture to protein ratio prevents microbial spoilage by low water activity. Some jerky products are very high in sugar and are therefore very sweet, unlike biltong, which rarely contains added sugars.


Crowded Nest Syndrome describes when adult children move back in with their parents following a divorce or other tumultuous event where the parent has lost their home. Crowded Nest syndrome day takes place annually 12 June. Crowded nest syndrome is the opposite of Empty nest syndrome. This describes a feeling of grief and loneliness parents may feel when their children leave home for the first time, such as to live on their own or to attend a college or university. It is not a clinical condition. Since young adults moving out from their families’ house is generally a normal and healthy event, the symptoms of empty nest syndrome often go unrecognized. This can result in depression and a loss of purpose for parents, since the departure of their children from “the nest” leads to adjustments in parents’ lives. Empty nest syndrome is especially common in full-time mothers. The first known Crowded Nest Awareness Day took place 12 June 2005. It was  inspired by the Kathleen Shaputis book Crowded Nest Syndrome: Surviving the Return of Adult Children


International Falafel Day

The first International Falafel Day took place 12 June 2012. Falafel  refers to a deep-fried ball, or a flat or doughnut-shaped patty, made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. Herbs, spices, and onion relatives are commonly added to the dough. It is a Levantine and Egyptian dish that most likely originated in Egypt, but is commonly eaten throughout Western Asia. The fritters are now found around the world as part of vegetarian cuisine, and as a form of street food. Falafel balls are commonly served in a pita, which acts as a pocket, or wrapped in a flatbread known as taboon. Falafel also frequently refers to a wrapped sandwich prepared with falafel balls laid over a bed of salad or pickled vegetables and drizzled with hot sauce or a tahini sauce. Falafel balls may also be eaten alone as a snack, or served as part of an assortment of appetizers known as a meze. The goal of International Falafel Day Is to connect the world through Falafel”


Orlando United Day

The inaugural Orlando United Day took place on 12 June 2017 with the intention honoring the memory of the 49 victims killed and supporting the survivors of the Pulse nightclub tragedy. The Pulse Nightclub shootings took place 12 June 2016 when a 29-year-old security guard named Omar Mateen, killed 49 people and wounded 53 others in a mass shooting inside Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, United States which was hosting a “Latin Night,” at the time and most of the victims were Hispanic. It is the deadliest incident of violence against LGBT people in U.S. history and the deadliest terrorist attack in the U.S. since the September 11 attacks in 2001. At the time, it was the deadliest mass shooting by a single shooter in U.S. history, being surpassed by the Las Vegas shooting a year later. By June 2018, the FBI had declined to classify the incident as an anti-gay hate crime, as evidence suggested that Mateen had scouted several different targets before choosing Pulse, and that he did not know it was a gay nightclub.

an Emergency call was made shortly after the shooting began, in which Mateen swore allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, and said the U.S. killing of Abu Waheeb in Iraq the previous month “triggered” the shooting. He later told a negotiator he was “out here right now” because of the American-led interventions in Iraq and in Syria and that the negotiator should tell the United States to stop the bombing. The incident was deemed a terrorist attack by FBI investigators. Orlando Police Department officers shot and killed him after a three-hour standoff.

World Day against child labour

The World Day Against Child Labour takes place annually on 12 June. The purpose of the event is to raise awareness and create a worldwide movement against child labour in any of its forms and to provide an opportunity to gain further support from individual governments and local authorities, as well as that of the International Labour Organisation social partners, civil society and others, in the campaign to tackle child labour. The World Day against Child Labour was first launched in 2002 spurred by ratifications of ILO Convention on the minimum age for employment and ILO Convention No. 182 on the worst forms of child labour.

Child labour refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful. This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations. Legislation across the world prohibit child labour. These laws do not consider all work by children as child labour; exceptions include work by child artists, family duties, supervised training, certain categories of work such as those by Amish children, some forms of child work common among indigenous American children, and others.

Child labour has existed to varying extents, through most of history. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, many children aged 5–14 from poorer families still worked in Europe, the United States and various colonies of European powers. These children mainly worked in agriculture, home-based assembly operations, factories, mining and in services such as news boys. Some worked night shifts lasting 12 hours. With the rise of household income, availability of schools and passage of child labour laws, the incidence rates of child labour fell.

In developing countries, with high poverty and poor schooling opportunities, child labour is still prevalent. In 2010, sub-saharan Africa had the highest incidence rates of child labour, with several African nations witnessing over 50 percent of children aged 5–14 working. Worldwide agriculture is the largest employer of child labour. The Vast majority of child labour is found in rural settings and informal urban economy; children are predominantly employed by their parents, rather than factories. Poverty and lack of schools are considered as the primary cause of child labour. Globally the incidence of child labour decreased from 25% to 10% between 1960 and 2003, according to the World Bank. Nevertheless, the total number of child labourers remains high, with UNICEF and ILO acknowledging an estimated 168 million children aged 5–17 worldwide, were involved in child labour in 2013.

The International Labour Organization (ILO), is the United Nations body which regulates the world of work. They launched the World Day Against Child Labour in 2002 in order to bring attention and join efforts to fight against child labour. This day brings together governments, local authorities, civil society and international, workers and employers organizations to point out the child labour problem and define the guidelines to help child labourers.

According to ILO’s data, hundreds of millions of girls and boys throughout the world are still involved in work that deprives them from receiving adequate education, health, leisure and basic freedoms, violating their human rights. Of these children, more than half are exposed to the worst forms of child labour, including work in hazardous environments, slavery, or other forms of forced labour, illicit activities such as drug trafficking and prostitution, as well as involvement in armed conflict.