The War of the Worlds

I am currently watching the BBC three part version of H.G.Wells The War of The Worlds which began 17 November. Based on H.G.Wells 1898 novel It takes place in 1905 (ten years after the original novel) and stars Rafe Spall as George, Eleanor Tomlinson as Amy and Robert Carlyle as Ogilvy

It begins when a group of Astronomers including Ogilvy from an Astronomical Observatory in Ottershaw and a journalist named George, notice a number of strange explosions on the planet Mars. Meanwhile everybody including George, his wife Amy and his Politician Brother, who works for the Admiralty in London, carry on with their everyday lives, blissfully unaware.

Then a few months later a mysterious Elongated meteorite lands in nearby Horsell Common. At first their is great excitement as George, Ogilvy and many otherAstronomers From the observatory in Ottershaw investigate the fallen asteroid on Horsell Common and speculate whether there may be Technologically superior and super-intelligent Martians inside. Upon further examination of the impact crater and the asteroid they discover that it is in fact artificial, hollow and made of metal and what’s more there is something moving about inside.

Excitement soon turns to terror when the asteroid suddenly begins unscrewing, And opens To reveal a mysterious sphere which systematically incinerates  all onlookers with a heat ray. Soon the Army are called in however they too find themselves powerless against the heat ray. Then a gigantic tripod rises up from inside the metal cylinder in the Crater and wreaks widespread destruction around Woking  using a heat ray and spreading noxious clouds of poisonous black smoke, killing thousands of people. Suddenly plunging people’s Lives into chaos So George tells Amy to flee The carnage and head for his Brothers house in London and safety. Then news is received concerning a second asteroid which has landed in Byfleet and has cut off the route to London….

John Parr

Grammy nominated English musician, John Parr was born 18 November 1952 in Worksop, England. He first entered the music scene when he was 12 years old and formed a band with two fellow schoolmates, which they named The Silence. The band had achieved some success. They eventually became professional and started to tour Europe. He then joined a band named Bitter Suite who were a huge success in the working men’s clubs in Yorkshire, he then formed a “Super Band” with musicians from other working men’s club bands, and named the band Ponders End after a Railway Station in North London. Parr secured a publishing deal with Carlin America in 1983, and in the same year Meat Loaf asked him to write some songs for his new album. That led to the fateful meeting with John Wolff, who was tour manager for The Who. Foreseeing the initial demise of The Who, Wolff was looking for a new venture and considered Parr to be a suitable partner. Parr first visited America in 1984 and worked with Meat Loaf on Bad Attitude. Meanwhile, Wolff secured Parr’s solo Atlantic recording deal in New York.

Naughty Naughty was Parr’s first U.S. Top 40 hit record,In 1985 Parr toured with his band “The Business” supporting Toto, his first show with Toto at Carowinds Paladium (Charlotte NC). Parr was then asked by David Foster to record a song for the film “St. Elmo’s Fire”. Parr and Foster wrote a song in honour of wheelchair athlete and activist Rick Hansen., “St. Elmo’s Fire” also became the theme for the film St. Elmo’s Fire (a “Brat Pack” film unrelated to Hansen’s life or achievements) and became a number one hit for Parr around the world and garnered many awards, including a Grammy nomination. Parr went on to tour with Tina Turner on “The Private Dancer” tour and also with Heart and The Beach Boys. In his charity work with The David Foster foundation, Parr has shared the stage and the sports field with stars including John Travolta, Michael J. Fox, Celine Dion, Paul Anka and Rob Lowe.

Parr later wrote “Under a Raging Moon” with Julia Downes for Roger Daltrey, a song that paid tribute to Keith Moon and told the story of The Who. The album became Daltrey’s biggest solo success in America. Parr’s last concert in the U.S. was a duet of the song with Daltrey at Madison Square Garden, joining them on stage were Yoko Ono, Julian Lennon, John Entwistle and Zak Starkey. Parr also sang with Marilyn Martin on the song “Through the Night”, from the Quicksilver soundtrack (1986) and wrote and produced further tracks for Martin’s debut album, including the hit “Night Moves”. Parr also wrote and sang the title songs “The Minute I Saw You”, from Three Men and a Baby soundtrack, and the power ballad “Restless Heart” (a.k.a. “Running Away with You (Restless Heart)”), from The Running Man soundtrack (this song was re-released on “Man With a Vision” album). Following the success of Meat Loaf’s album, Parr contributed to the next album with the hit duet “Rock & Roll Mercenaries and also began work with Albert Magnoli (director of Purple Rain) on the film American Anthem for which he wrote and performed the main theme “Two Hearts”. Parr’s other film credits include “Naughty Naughty” from the cult horror film Near Dark and “Love Grammar” from the Karen Black movie Flight of the Spruce Goose. He has also written songs for Tom Jones, The Monkees, Tygers of Pan Tang, Romeo’s Daughter and Bucks Fizz. The Pepsi Company and Jack Calmes Satellite TV Corporation hosted a gig from London beamed live across America, Japan & Australia. Parr was the featured act, having done two similar shows (one from the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum where the flame was lit for a special performance of “St. Elmo’s Fire”, and was beamed live for Japan, and the New Year Christmas Show from London).

Parr was signed by US clothing designer “Chams De Baron” to promote their sports leisure range, and he featured in fashion magazines and poster campaigns. Parr also co-presented the UK leg of the “American Music Awards” with Phil Collins. In 1988 Parr was offered the opportunity to collaborate with “Mutt” Lange; (co)producing an album for Romeo’s Daughter. In 1989, Parr played the lead role in the soundtrack album for Paris, an epic rock opera written by Jon English and David Mackay. Paris is an epic love story of Paris and Helen of Troy set against the Trojan War. Parr performed with the London Symphony Orchestra alongside Harry Nilsson, Demis Roussos, Francis Rossi and Barry Humphries. Parr is also known for co-authoring “The Best (A Man Can Get)”, the theme used in a series of highly successful Gillette razor commercials from the 1980s onwards, also spawning the company’s chief slogan.

A solo acoustic version appears on the album “Letter to America”. In 2006 St Elmo’s Fire was sampled for a dance remix of “St. Elmo’s Fire”, entitled “New Horizon” and In 2007, Parr joined Canadian pop-rock artist Bryan Adams on his tour” Parr released “Walking Out of the Darkness”, a tribute to Doncaster Rovers F.C. In 2007 ahead of the club’s appearance in the Football League Trophy final at Cardiff’s Millennium Stadium. Parr also returned to Canada to perform at the Man in Motion 20th anniversary. Parr’s song “St Elmo’s Fire (Man in Motion)” was wheelchair athlete Rick Hansen’s anthem, helping him wheel 25,000 miles around the globe and raising awareness and money for spinal research. To date the Rick Hansen foundation has raised $200 million and helped build a research centre, ICORD, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

In 2007 Parr wrote and recorded the main title for The Brothers Solomon and Also opened for Bryan Adams at the Keepmoat Stadium in Parr’s home town Doncaster. In 2008, Parr was a special guest for the U.S. rock band Journey on their UK Tour and in 2011 Parr performed an acoustic set as Special Guest of Richard Marx on his UK Tour and also released a double album titled “Letter to America” before touring America. Parr was a guest on ESPN show SportsNation where he sang a special rendition of “St. Elmo’s Fire” replacing the words with Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow. A reworking of the song’s lyrics, sung by Parr and titled “Tim Tebow’s Fire”. Throughout 2012 Parr toured America as ambassador for the USO playing concerts and benefits for American servicemen and women. In 2012 Parr wrote and produced a new studio album The Mission. The funds went to The USO, USA Cares and Military Families charities. In 2014, Parr reunited with The Who, Jeff Beck, Mick Hucknall and other rock musicians for Kenney Jones’ Rock & Horsepower concert to raise money and awareness for prostate cancer. Parr joined forces with Guns and Roses producer Mike Clink, Slash and Nikki Sixx, to collaborate on the forthcoming Pete Way album. At the O2 Parr joined producer Tony Visconti, Woody Woodmansey (Spiders From Mars), Glen Gregory (Heaven 17) and many members of the original Bowie band to perform in the “Man Who Sold the World” concert. Parr continued his work with the military playing concerts and fund raisers for “Help For Heroes”.

Christmas 2014 saw the release of “Ring Out The Bells”, a charity single produced by David Mackay, which featured Charlie Norman and the children of St Catherine’s School along with guest performances by Parr and Meatloaf duetist Lorraine Crosby (I Would Do Anything For Love). The proceeds went to The Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital. Parr toured during 2015 alongside Bonnie Tyler, Kenney Jones, Cockney Rebel and also wrote and recorded “Man of Steel” for the late International rugby hero Steve Prescott. The 88th Academy Awards (Oscars) included the launch of Google’s Android campaign featuring John and St Elmo’s Fire as the theme tune. It’s Ironic as the song was tipped as the favourite for the “Best Original Song” Oscar in 1985 but had to be withdrawn as John had told the media that although the song was written for the film he was inspired by Rick Hansen’s attempt to circumnavigate the globe in his wheelchair. 31 years later the song is back at the Oscars as the theme song for “Rock Paper Scissors” Androids’s new campaign.

Alan Dean Foster

Prolific American fantasy and science fiction novelist Alan Dean Foster was born November 18, 1946. He is known for his science fiction novels set in the Humanx Commonwealth, an interstellar ethical/political union of species including humankind and the insectoid Thranx. Many of these novels feature Philip Lynx (“Flinx”), an empathic young man who has found himself involved in something which threatens the survival of the Galaxy. Flinx’s constant companion since childhood is a minidrag named Pip, a flying, empathic snake capable of spitting a highly corrosive and violently neurotoxic venom.

One of Foster’s better-known fantasy works is the Spellsinger series, in which a young musician is summoned into a world populated by talking creatures where his music allows him to do real magic whose effects depends on the lyrics of the popular songs he sings (although with somewhat unpredictable results).

Many of Foster’s works have a strong ecological element to them, often with an environmental twist. Often the villains in his stories experience their downfall because of a lack of respect for other alien species or seemingly innocuous bits of their surroundings. This can be seen in such works as Midworld, about a semi-sentient planet that is essentially one large rainforest, and Cachalot, set on an ocean world populated by sentient cetaceans. Foster usually devotes a large part of his novels to descriptions of the strange environments of alien worlds and the coexistence of their flora and fauna. Perhaps the most extreme example of this is Sentenced to Prism, in which the protagonist finds himself trapped on a world where life is based on silicon rather than carbon, as on Earth.

Foster was the ghostwriter of the original novelization of Star Wars which had been credited solely to George Lucas. After two other writers had declined his offer of a flat fee of $5,000 for the work, Lucas brought to Foster the original screenplay, after which Foster fleshed out the backstory of time, place, planets, races, history and technology in such detail that it became canonical for all subsequent Star Wars novels. Foster wrote the novel Splinter of the Mind’s Eye, a Star Wars sequel published in 1978, two years prior to the release of The Empire Strikes Back. Foster’s story relied heavily on abandoned concepts that appeared in Lucas’s early treatments for the first film. Foster was stunned when Return of the Jedi revealed the characters of Luke and Leia as brother and sister; in Splinter, the characters exhibit quite a bit of romantic and sexual energy. Although Splinter was contradicted by later entries in the Star Wars film canon, it was the first “Star Wars expanded universe” entry written (although not the first published—a Marvel Comics story holds that honor). Foster wrote the novelization of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

Foster is also credited with writing the story for Star Trek: The Motion Picture. He also wrote 10 books based on episodes of the animated Star Trek, the first six books each consisting of three linked novella-length episode adaptations, and the last four being expanded adaptations of single episodes that segued into original story. In the mid-seventies, he wrote original Star Trek stories for the Peter Pan-label Star Trek audio story records. He later wrote the novelization of the 2009 film Star Trek, his first Star Trek novel in over 30 years. He later wrote the novelization for Star Trek’s sequel, Star Trek Into Darkness.

Mickey Mouse Day

Mickey Mouse day takes place November 18 to commemorate the anniversary of the first appearance of Mickey Mouse in the short film Steamboat Willie, on 18 November 1928,. Mickey Mouse was originally conceived by Walt Disney as a replacement for Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, an earlier cartoon character created by the Disney studio for Universal Film producer Charles Mintz. Unfortunately In 1928, Disney fell out with Mintz and decided to restart from scratch determined to hold onto the rights of his characters. The new Disney Studio initially consisted of animator Ub Iwerks, Les Clark and Wilfred Jackson

In 1928, Ub Iwerks started drawing up new character ideas. Iwerks tried sketches of various animals, such as dogs and cats, such as Clarabelle Cow, Horace Horsecollar and Flip the Frog series. Walt Disney then got the inspiration for Mickey Mouse from a tame mouse at his desk at Laugh-O-Gram Studio in Kansas City, Missouri. Ub Iwerks then created a new mouse character for Disney. “Mortimer Mouse” However his wife, Lillian, convinced him to change it to Mickey Mouse.

Mickey mouse made his debut in a test screening of the cartoon short Plane Crazy, on May 15, 1928, Walt went on to produce a second Mickey short, The Gallopin’ Gaucho. The next cartoon short Steamboat Willie was first released on November 18, 1928, in New York. It was co-directed by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks. Iwerks assisted by Johnny Cannon, Les Clark, Wilfred Jackson and Dick Lundy. It parodied Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill, Jr., As a result of being one of the first cartoons with sound, Mickey would soon become the most prominent animated character of the time

The cartoon was not the first cartoon to feature a soundtrack connected to the action. Fleischer Studios, headed by brothers Dave and Max Fleischer, had already released a number of sound cartoons using the DeForest system in the mid-1920s. However, these cartoons did not keep the sound synchronized throughout the film. For Steamboat Willie, Disney had the sound recorded with a click track that kept the musicians on the beat. This is apparent during the “Turkey in the Straw” sequence when Mickey’s actions exactly match the accompanying instruments. Walt Disney then added sound to both Plane Crazy and The Gallopin’ Gaucho (which had originally been silent releases) and their new release added to Mickey’s success and popularity. A fourth Mickey short, The Barn Dance, was also made.

Mickey also featured as a comic strip character. His self-titled newspaper strip, drawn primarily by Floyd Gottfredson, ran for 45 years. Mickey has also appeared in comic books such as Disney Italy’s Topolino, MM Mickey Mouse Mystery Magazine, and Wizards of Mickey, and in television series such as The Mickey Mouse Club (1955–1996) and others. He also appears in other media such as video games as well as merchandising and is a meetable character at the Disney parks.

Mickey generally appears alongside his girlfriend Minnie Mouse, his pet dog Pluto, his friends Donald Duck and Goofy, and his nemesis Pete, among others. In Mickey’s early films he was often characterized not as a hero, but as an ineffective young suitor to Minnie Mouse. The Barn Dance is the first time in which Mickey is turned down by Minnie in favor of Pete. Walt Disney himself voiced both Mickey and Minnie and remained Mickey’s voice through 1946 for theatrical cartoons. Jimmy MacDonald took over the role in 1946, but Walt provided Mickey’s voice again from 1955 to 1959 for The Mickey Mouse Club television series on ABC.

The Opry House was the first time in which Mickey wore his white gloves. Mickey wears them in almost all of his subsequent appearances and many other characters followed suit. The three lines on the back of Mickey’s gloves represent darts in the gloves’ fabric extending from between the digits of the hand, typical of glove design of the era. When the Cat’s Away essentially a remake of the Alice Comedy, “Alice Rattled by Rats”, was an unusual appearance for Mickey. Although Mickey and Minnie still maintained their anthropomorphic characteristics, they were depicted as the size of regular mice and living with a community many other mice as pests in a home. The next Mickey short The Barnyard Battle (April 25, 1929) depict Mickey as a soldier and also the first to place him in combat. The Karnival Kid (1929) was the first time Mickey spoke. Before this he had only whistled, laughed, and grunted. His first words were “Hot dogs! Hot dogs!”. The next animated short Mickey’s Follies (1929) introduced the song “Minnie’s Yoo-Hoo” which became the theme song for Mickey Mouse films for the next several years. Mickey’s dog Pluto also appeared as Mickey’s pet in The Moose Hunt (1931) after previously appearing as Minnie’s dog “Rover” in The Picnic (1930). The Cactus Kid (1930) was the last film to be animated by Ub Iwerks at Disney.

Ub Iwerks then left to start his own studio. The departure is considered a turning point in Mickey’s career, as well as that of Walt Disney. Walt lost the man who served as his closest colleague and confidant since 1919. Mickey lost the man responsible for his original design and for the direction or animation of several of the shorts. Disney and his remaining staff continued the production of the Mickey series, and he was able to eventually find a number of animators to replace Iwerks. Mickey’s popularity rose and by 1932 The Mickey Mouse Club would have one million members. At the 5th Academy Awards in 1932, Mickey received his first Academy Award nomination, received for Mickey’s Orphans (1931). Walt Disney also received an honorary Academy Award for the creation of Mickey Mouse. Despite being eclipsed by the Silly Symphonies short the Three Little Pigs in 1933, Mickey still maintained great popularity. Mickey Mouse next appeard In Orphan’s Benefit (1934) alongside Donald Duck who had been introduced earlier that year in the Silly Symphonies series. Mickey first appeared animated in color in Parade of the Award Nominees in 1932. Which was created for the 5th Academy Awards ceremony. Mickey’s official first color film came in 1935 with The Band Concert which features Mickey conducting the William Tell Overture, however the band is swept up by a tornado. In 1994, The Band Concert was voted the third-greatest cartoon of all time in a poll of animation professionals. In 1935, Walt also received a special award from the League of Nations for creating Mickey. Mickey, Donald Duck, and Goofy featured in some of Mickey’s most critically acclaimed films, including Mickey’s Fire Brigade (1935), Moose Hunters (1937), Clock Cleaners (1937), Lonesome Ghosts (1937), Boat Builders (1938), and Mickey’s Trailer (1938). Also during this era, Mickey starred in Brave Little Tailor (1938), an adaptation of The Valiant Little Tailor, which was nominated for an Academy Award.

Mickey was redesigned by animator Fred Moore, in The Pointer (1939). Mickey was given white eyes with pupils instead of black eyes, a Caucasian skin colored face, and a pear-shaped body. He changed once more in The Little Whirlwind, where he lost his tail, got more realistic ears that changed with perspective and a different body anatomy. But this change would only last for a short period of time before returning to the one in “The Pointer”, with the exception of his pants. In his final theatrical cartoons in the 1950s, he was given eyebrows, which were removed in the more recent cartoons.

In 1940 Mickey appeared in his first feature-length film, Fantasia. His screen role as The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, set to the symphonic poem of the same name by Paul Dukas, is perhaps the most famous segment of the film and one of Mickey’s most iconic roles. The segment features no dialogue at all, only the music. The apprentice (Mickey), not willing to do his chores, puts on the sorcerer’s magic hat after the sorcerer goes to bed and casts a spell on a broom, which causes the broom to come to life and perform the most tiring chore—filling up a deep well using two buckets of water. When the well eventually overflows, Mickey finds himself unable to control the broom, leading to a near-flood. After the segment ends, Mickey is seen in silhouette shaking hands with Leopold Stokowski, who conducts all the music heard in Fantasia. Mickey has often been pictured in the red robe and blue sorcerer’s hat in merchandising. It was also featured into the climax of Fantasmic!, an attraction at the Disney theme parks.

After 1940, Mickey’s popularity would decline until his 1955 re-emergence as a daily children’s television personality.[36] Despite this, the character continued to appear regularly in animated shorts until 1943 (winning his only competitive Academy Award—with canine companion Pluto—for a short subject, Lend a Paw) and again from 1946 to 1953. The last regular installment of the Mickey Mouse film series came in 1953 with The Simple Things in which Mickey and Pluto go fishing and are pestered by a flock of seagulls.

In the 1950s, Mickey became more known for his appearances on television, particularly with The Mickey Mouse Club. Many of his theatrical cartoon shorts were rereleased on television series such as Ink & Paint Club, various forms of the Walt Disney anthology television series, and on home video. Mickey returned to theatrical animation in 1983 with Mickey’s Christmas Carol, an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol in which Mickey played Bob Cratchit. This was followed up in 1990 with The Prince and the Pauper.

Throughout the decades, Mickey Mouse competed with Warner Bros.’ Bugs Bunny for animated popularity. But in 1988, the two rivals finally shared screen time in the Robert Zemeckis Disney/Amblin film Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Disney and Warner signed an agreement stating that each character had the same amount of screen time in the scene.

Similar to his animated inclusion into a live-action film on Roger Rabbit, Mickey made a featured cameo appearance in the 1990 television special The Muppets at Walt Disney World where he met Kermit the Frog. The two are established in the story as having been old friends. The Muppets have otherwise spoofed and referenced Mickey over a dozen times since the 1970s. Eventually, The Muppets were purchased by the Walt Disney Company in 2004.

His most recent theatrical cartoon short was 2013’s Get a Horse! which was preceded by 1995’s Runaway Brain, while from 1999 to 2004, he appeared in direct-to-video features like Mickey’s Once Upon a Christmas, Mickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers and the computer-animated Mickey’s Twice Upon a Christmas.

Many television series have centered on Mickey, such as the ABC shows Mickey Mouse Works (1999–2000), Disney’s House of Mouse (2001–2003), Disney Channel’s Mickey Mouse Clubhouse (2006–2016), and Mickey and the Roadster Racers (2017–). Prior to all these, Mickey was also featured as an unseen character in the Bonkers episode “You Oughta Be In Toons”.

Mickey has recently been announced to star in two films. One is being based on the Magic Kingdom theme park at the Walt Disney World Resort, while the other features Mickey, Donald, and Goofy. Since 2013, Disney Channel has been airing new 3-minute Mickey Mouse shorts, with animator Paul Rudish at the helm, incorporating elements of Mickey’s late twenties-early thirties look with a contemporary twist. on November 4, 2018. ABC television aired a two-hour prime time special, Mickey’s 90th spectacular, in honor of Mickey’s 90th birthday. The program featured never-before-seen short videos and several other celebrities who wanted to share their memories about Mickey Mouse and performed some of the Disney songs to impress Mickey.

Mickey Mouse has received ten nominations for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. These are Mickey’s Orphans (1931), Building a Building (1933), Brave Little Tailor (1938), The Pointer (1939), Lend a Paw (1941), Squatter’s Rights (1946), Mickey and the Seal (1948), Mickey’s Christmas Carol (1983), Runaway Brain (1995), and Get a Horse! (2013). Among these, Lend a Paw was the only film to actually win the award. Walt Disney also received an honorary Academy Award in 1932 in recognition of Mickey’s creation and popularity.

In 1994, four of Mickey’s cartoons were included in the book The 50 Greatest Cartoons which listed the greatest cartoons of all time as voted by members of the animation field. The films were The Band Concert (#3), Steamboat Willie (#13), Brave Little Tailor (#26), and Clock Cleaners (#27). On November 18, 1978, in honor of his 50th anniversary, Mickey became the first cartoon character to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The star is located on 6925 Hollywood Blvd. Melbourne (Australia) runs the annual Moomba festival street procession and appointed Mickey Mouse as their King of Moomba. Although immensely popular with children, there was controversy with the appointment: some Melburnians wanted a ‘home-grown’ choice, e.g. Blinky Bill. Patricia O’Carroll (from Disneyland’s Disney on Parade show) was performing the mouse,

Mickey was the Grand Marshal of the Tournament of Roses Parade on New Year’s Day 2005. He was the first cartoon character to receive the honor and only the second fictional character after Kermit the Frog in 1996. Mickey Mouse went on to appear in over 130 films, Ten of Mickey’s cartoons were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, one of which, Lend a Paw, won the award in 1942.

Occult Day/Pushbutton phone day☎️

Occult day takes place on 18 November. The purpose of Occult Day is to encourage people to delve into the mysterious world of the occult, where life beyond the natural world seeps into everyday life, to explore what is hidden, to commune with spirits and to seek the truths that hide behind the stars and between the shadows. If you’ve ever heard strange whispers or dreamt dreams that became prophetic, then Occult Day is your opportunity to listen a little closer, dream a little deeper, and reach for those mysteries that lie just beyond the reach of the common man.

The occult (from the Latin word occultus meaning “clandestine, hidden, secret”) is “knowledge of the hidden” or “knowledge of the paranormal”, as opposed to facts and “knowledge of the measurable”, usually referred to as science. The term is sometimes taken to mean knowledge that “is meant only for certain people” or that “must be kept hidden”, but for most practicing occultists it is simply the study of a deeper spiritual reality that extends pure reason and the physical sciences. The terms esoteric and arcane can also be used to describe the occult, in addition to their meanings unrelated to the supernatural. The hidden that is referred to isn’t merely that which lies beneath the stone or hidden in the dark, but those places within ourselves that call out in our wilder moments, asking us to truly embrace our spiritual selves and the secrets it has to impart on us.

The term occult sciences was used in the 16th century to refer to astrology, alchemy, and natural magic. The term occultism emerged in 19th-century France, where it came to be associated with various French esoteric groups connected to Éliphas Lévi and Papus, and in 1875 was introduced into the English language by the esotericist Helena Blavatsky. Throughout the 20th century, the term was used idiosyncratically by a range of different authors, but by the 21st century was commonly employed – including by academic scholars of esotericism – to refer to a range of esoteric currents that developed in the mid-19th century and their descendants. Occultism is thus often used to categorise such esoteric traditions as Spiritualism, Theosophy, Anthroposophy, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and New Age.

Particularly since the late twentieth century, various authors have used the occult as a substantivized adjective. In this usage, “the occult” is a category into which varied beliefs and practices are placed if they are considered to fit into neither religion nor science. “The occult” in this sense is very broad, encompassing such phenomenon as beliefs in vampires or fairies and movements like Ufology and parapsychology. In that same period, occult and culture were combined to form the neologism occulture. Initially used in the industrial music scene, it was later given scholarly applications.

Occult Day was established to Educate people concerning the occult. Occult practices are not all dangerous paths and profane dealings with entities of dubious moral intent, instead they are a way to expand our consciousness and understand the part of ourselves that lives outside the material. Every culture has its mystery religions and occult practices, whether it’s the complex workings of Ritual Magic or the exploration of G-d through the Kaballah in Judaism, there isn’t a single culture that isn’t touched by the Occult and Occult Day is a chance to finally listen and move forward into your greater knowledge.

Other Holidays and events occurring on November 18

Pushbutton Phone Day
Married To a Scorpio Support Day
National Vichyssoise Day
William Tell Day