More exciting Fantasy and Science Fiction novels

A Sellsword’s Compassion By Jacob Peppers

A Sellsword’s Compassion is Book One of The Seven Virtues by Jacob Peppers. It takes place in a War torn land as the sons and daughters of the late King Marcus battle over who will claim their father’s throne and able-bodied men and women flock to one cause or the other in the hopes of a better tomorrow. At least, most of them. If life has taught the jaded sellsword, Aaron Envelar, anything, it’s that hope is for fools and causes are a sure remedy for breathing.

However his latest job leads him to the corpse of a prince and a conspiracy that threatens to destroy the entire realm, Aaron is forced to choose sides in a war he doesn’t want, between forces he doesn’t understand. Thrust into a world of mythical assassins, a madman with a superhuman strength, and a nagging ball of light with a superiority complex who claims to be the embodiment of compassion, Aaron takes on his hardest job yet—staying alive.

Benjamin Ashwood by AC Cobble

Set Against the backdrop of warring political, economic, and military factions, Benjamin Ashwood is book one in an engaging fantasy adventure, series by A.C.Cobble which is Packed full of action and adventure. It features Young Benjamin who starts off as your typical orphan in a small farming town. Life is simple in Ben’s village until an unexpected attack brings the arrival of exciting strangers.

Before Ben understands what is happening, they’ve recruited his sister to go with them on an adventure to the big city where his sister enrols as a pupil at the all-female magic school. To ensure her safety, Ben accompanies her among company of mysterious swordsmen and magic-users. At the city Benjamin starts brewing beer for a living,

This goes well until he gets involved in politics of the dangerous kind and discovers that the city is ruled by unscrupulous leaders and he finds himself in a more dangerous world than he ever imagined. Mages, demons, thieves, and assassins are just a few of the perils he faces on an epic journey to a city shrouded in myth and legend. Ben and his friends end up battling a threat to all of mankind and Benjamin must decide whether to flee or stand up to them…

Trilisk Ruins Michael McCloskey

The Trilisk Ruins is the first book in the PIT series by Michael McCloskey. They feature a character named Telisa Relachik who studied to be a xenoarchaeologist in a future where humans have found alien artifacts but haven’t ever encountered live aliens. Then she discovers an Ancient race of cephalopod like aliens called Trilisk. Of all the aliens whose extinct civilizations are investigated, the Trilisks are the most advanced and the most mysterious.

Telisa refuses to join the government because of her opposition to its hard-handed policies restricting civilian investigation and trade of alien artifacts, despite the fact that her estranged father is a captain in the United Nations Space Force. However When a group of artifact smugglers recruits her, she can’t pass up the chance at getting her hands on objects that could advance her life’s work. But she soon learns her expectations of excitement and riches come with serious drawbacks as she ends up fighting for her life on a mysterious alien planet.

Valley of Embers (The Landkist Saga Book 1) by Steven Kelliher

Valley of Embers is book one of five in the epic fast-paced Landkist fantasy series by Steven Keliher. It is set in the mythical realm of Landkist where For hundreds of years, the flame-wielding Embers have been the last line of defense against the nightmare creatures from the World Apart, but the attacks are getting worse. Kole Reyna and his guards Protect Last Lake from the terrors of the night. They are the Last Line of defence, and he fears for his people’s future.

Then Kole is wounded by a demon unlike any they have seen before, and the Emberfolk believe it is a sign of an ancient enemy returned, a powerful Sage known as the Eastern Dark. Soon the besieged inhabitants of the Valley of Embers are one of only a handful of walled towns remaining as the last bastions against the night, and the dwindling population of Emberfolk struggle to defend their secluded homes from the Dark Kind. Kole has never trusted in prophecy, but with his people hanging on the precipice, he reluctantly agrees to lead the Valley’s greatest warriors in a last desperate bid for survival. They must risk everything in search of a former ally long-thought dead, to help them, and whether Kole trusts him or not, he may be the only one capable of saving them.

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

English poet, literary critic and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge  was born on 21 October 1772 in the country town of Ottery St Mary, Devon, England. In 1781, 8-year-old Samuel was sent to Christ’s Hospital, a charity school founded in the 16th century in Greyfriars, London, where became friends with Charles Lamb, and studied the works of Virgil and William Lisle Bowles.From 1791 until 1794, Coleridge attended Jesus College, Cambridge. In 1792, he won the Browne Gold Medal for an ode that he wrote on the slave trade. In December 1793, he left the college and enlisted in the Royal Dragoons using the false name “Silas Tomkyn Comberbache”. Whilst At the university, he was introduced to political and theological ideas then considered radical, including those of the poet Robert Southey. Coleridge joined Southey in a plan, soon abandoned, to found a utopian commune-like society, called Pantisocracy, in the wilderness of Pennsylvania.

Between 1797 and 1798, he lived at Coleridge Cottage, in Nether Stowey, Somerset, and In 1795, Coleridge met poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy. (Wordsworth, having visited him and being enchanted by the surroundings, rented Alfoxton Park, a little over three miles [5 km] away.) Besides the Rime of The Ancient Mariner, he composed the symbolic poem Kubla Khan, written—Coleridge himself claimed—as a result of an opium dream, in “a kind of a reverie”; and the first part of the narrative poem Christabel. The writing of Kubla Khan, written about the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan and his legendary palace at Xanadu, was said to have been interrupted by the arrival of a “Person from Porlock” — an event that has been embellished upon in such varied contexts as science fiction and Nabokov’s Lolita. During this period, he also produced his much-praised “conversation” poems This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison, Frost at Midnight, and The Nightingale.

In 1798, Coleridge and Wordsworth published a joint volume of poetry, Lyrical Ballads, which proved to be the starting point for the English romantic age, the star of the collection was Coleridge’s first version of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Coleridge also worked briefly in Shropshire, where he came in December 1797 as locum to its local Unitarian minister, Dr Rowe, in their church in the High Street at Shrewsbury. He is said to have read his Rime of the Ancient Mariner at a literary evening in Mardol and was contemplating a career in the ministry. In 1798, Coleridge and Wordsworth travelled to Germany, where they became interested in German philosophy, especially the transcendental idealism and critical philosophy of Immanuel Kant, and in the literary criticism of the 18th century dramatist Gotthold Lessing. Coleridge studied German and, after his return to England, translated the dramatic trilogy Wallenstein by the German Classical poet Friedrich Schiller into English. In 1799, Coleridge and Wordsworth stayed at Sockburn, near Darlington. It was here that Coleridge wrote his ballad-poem Love, addressed to Sara. The knight mentioned is the mailed figure on the Conyers tomb in ruined Sockburn church. The figure has a wyvern at his feet, a reference to the Sockburn Worm slain by Sir John Conyers (and a possible source for Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwocky). The poem was a direct inspiration for John Keats’ famous poem La Belle Dame Sans Merci.

Around 1800 he settled with his family and friends at Keswick in the Lake District of Cumberland to be near Grasmere, where Wordsworth had moved. In 1804, he travelled to Sicily and Malta, However he returned to England in 1806 but returned to Malta in 1897 and then travelled in Sicily and Italy, in the hope that leaving Britain’s damp climate would improve his health and thus enable him to reduce his consumption of opium. it was during this period that Coleridge became a full-blown opium addict, using the drug as a substitute for the lost vigour and creativity of his youth.In 1809, Coleridge made his second attempt to become a newspaper publisher and published a weekly journal entitled The Friend, which he wrote, edited, and published almost entirely single-handedly. Despite many financial difficulties The Friend became a highly influential work drawing upon every corner of Coleridge’s remarkably diverse knowledge of law, philosophy, morals, politics, history, and literary criticism, and it ran for 25 issues and was republished in book form a number of times. Between 1810 and 1820, Coleridge gave a series of lectures in London and Bristol – those on Shakespeare renewed interest in the playwright as a model for contemporary writers. Much of Coleridge’s reputation as a literary critic is founded on the lectures that he undertook in the winter of 1810–11. These lectures were heralded in the prospectus as “A Course of Lectures on Shakespeare and Milton, in Illustration of the Principles of Poetry.” Coleridge’s ill-health, opium-addiction problems, and somewhat unstable personality meant that all his lectures were plagued with problems of delays and a general irregularity of quality from one lecture to the next.

However, His lecture on Hamlet in 1812 is considered the best and has influenced Hamlet studies ever since. In August 1814, Coleridge was approached by Lord Byron’s publisher, John Murray, about the possibility of translating Goethe’s classic Faust (1808). Coleridge was regarded by many as the greatest living writer on the demonic so he accepted the commission. In 1817,Coleridge, with his addiction worsening, his spirits depressed, and his family alienated, took residence in Highgate, where he finished the Biographia Literaria (1817), a volume composed of 23 chapters of autobiographical notes and dissertations on various subjects, including some incisive literary theory and criticism. He also composed much poetry here and had many inspirations — a few of them from opium overdose, including Sibylline Leaves (1817), Aids to Reflection (1825), and Church and State (1826). Coleridge remained here for the rest of his life, and tragically died in Highgate, London on 25 July 1834 as a result of heart failure compounded by an unknown lung disoirder. The house has since become a place of literary pilgrimage.

For Whom the bell tolls by Ernest Hemingway

The first edition of the Ernest Hemingway novel For Whom the Bell Tolls was published 21 October 1940. The novel graphically describes the brutality of the civil war in Spain during this time. It is told primarily through the thoughts and experiences of the protagonist, Robert Jordan. It draws on Hemingway’s own experiences in the Spanish Civil War as a reporter for the North American Newspaper Alliance.

Jordan is an American who has lived in Spain during the pre-war period, and fights in the International Brigades for the Republic against Francisco Franco’s fascist forces. An experienced dynamiter, he is ordered by a Soviet general to travel behind enemy lines and destroy a bridge with the aid of a band of local anti-fascist guerrillas, in order to prevent enemy troops from responding to an upcoming offensive. On his mission, Jordan meets the rebel Anselmo who brings him to the hidden guerrilla camp and initially acts as an intermediary between Jordan and the other guerrilla fighters.

In the camp, Jordan encounters María, a young Spanish woman whose life had been shattered by her parents’ execution and her rape at the hands of the Falangists (part of the fascist coalition) at the outbreak of the war. His strong sense of duty clashes with both the unwillingness of the guerrilla leader Pablo to commit to an operation that would endanger himself and his band, and Jordan’s own new-found lust for life which arises from his love for María. Pablo’s wife, Pilar, usurps Pablo’s leadership and pledges the allegiance of the guerrillas to Jordan’s mission. However, when another band of anti-fascist guerrillas, led by El Sordo, is surrounded and killed, Pablo steals the dynamite and detonators hoping to prevent the demolition and thereby avoid fascist reprisals. Although he disposes of the detonators by throwing them down a gorge into the river, Pablo regrets abandoning his comrades and returns to assist in the operation.

However, the enemy, learns of the coming offensive, and is prepared to ambush it in force. Regardless of this, Jordan understands that he must still demolish the bridge in an attempt to prevent Fascist reinforcements from overwhelming his allies. Lacking the detonation equipment stolen by Pablo, Jordan plans an alternative method to explode the dynamite by using hand grenades with wires attached so that their pins can be pulled from a distance. This improvised plan is considerably more dangerous because the men must increase their proximity to the explosion. While Pablo, Pilar, and other guerrilla members attack the posts at the two ends of the bridge, Jordan and Anselmo plant and detonate the dynamite, costing Anselmo his life when he is hit by a piece of shrapnel. While escaping, Jordan is maimed when a tank shoots his horse out from under him. Knowing he would only slow his comrades down, he bids goodbye to María and ensures that she escapes to safety with the surviving guerrillas…

Jack the Giant Slayer

I have recently watched the exciting Fantasy Film Jack the Giant Slayer. It is Based on the fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk and takes place In the Kingdom of Cloister, where Jack, a young farm boy, becomes fascinated by the legend of Erik, an ancient king who defeated an army of invading giants from a realm in the sky by controlling them with a magic crown. At the same time, Princess Isabelle becomes fascinated with the same legend.

Ten years later, Jack goes into town to sell his horse to support his uncle’s farm. There, Jack spots Isabelle and becomes enamored with her after defending her honor from a group of hooligans. Meanwhile, Lord Roderick returns to his study, only to find that a monk has robbed him. The monk offers Jack some magic beans he stole from Roderick as collateral for Jack’s horse. Back at the castle, Isabelle quarrels with her father King Brahmwell as she wants to explore the kingdom, but he wants her to stay and marry Roderick. Likewise, Jack’s uncle scolds him for being foolish before throwing the beans on the floor and leaving the house. Determined to be free, Isabelle sneaks out of the castle and seeks shelter from the rain in Jack’s house. As it rains, one of the beans takes root and grows into a massive beanstalk that carries the house and Isabelle into the sky as Jack falls to the ground.

Jack, Roderick, and Roderick’s attendant Wicke volunteer to join the king’s knights, led by Elmont and his second in-command, Crawe, and climb the beanstalk in search of Isabelle. As they climb, Roderick and Wicke cut the safety rope, intentionally killing some of the knights. At the top, they discover the giants’ realm and decide to split into two groups: one with Jack, Elmont, and Crawe, and the other including Roderick and Wicke, but not before Roderick forcibly takes the remaining beans from Jack (although Jack manages to save one for himself). Jack’s group is trapped by a giant, who takes everyone prisoner except Jack. Meanwhile, Roderick’s group encounters two other giants; one eats Wicke, but before he can eat Roderick, Roderick dons the magical crown.

Jack follows the giant to their stronghold, the two-headed giant leader, Fallon, kills Crawe. Jack finds Isabelle and Elmont imprisoned there. As the giants prepare to kill their remaining prisoners, Roderick walks in and enslaves the giants with the crown. He incites the giants to attack Cloister at dawn and gives them permission to eat Isabelle and Elmont. However Jack rescues Isabelle and Elmont as one of the giants prepares to cook Elmont as a pig-in-a-blanket. The trio makes for the beanstalk where the giant guarding the beanstalk is pushed off the realm’s edge. Seeing the giant’s body, Brahmwell is understandably alarmed and orders the beanstalk cut down to avoid an invasion by the giants.

Jack and Isabelle head down the beanstalk, while Elmont stays to confront Roderick however Fallon takes the crown and Elmont is forced to escape down the beanstalk. Jack, Isabelle, and Elmont all survive the fall after the beanstalk is cut down. As everyone returns home, Jack warns that the giants are using Roderick’s beans to create beanstalks to descend down to Earth and attack Cloister. The giants lay siege to the castle and chase Jack, Isabelle, and Brahmwell inside, where Elmont fills the moat with oil and sets it on fire. Fallon falls in the moat and breaks into the castle from below. As the siege continues, Fallon captures Jack and Isabelle, and it id up to Jack to recover the Crown and the beans and banish the Giants to their own realm in an exciting finale.

The Uluru Code: by Ernest Dempsey (Author), Jason Whited (Editor)

I enjoy reading exciting adventure thrillers by Clive Cussler so I thought I would read The Uluru Code by Ernest Dempsey and Jason Wited. The Uluru Code is a high octane archaeological thriller featuring an archeologist named Sean Wyatt and is the tenth novel in the Sean Wyatt Adventure Series. In this novel Sean again finds himself caught up in intrigue, adventure and mystery after receiving A mysterious email, containing a desperate request. Then a museum curator goes missing, and another is found murdered, so Sean Wyatt and Tommy Schultz investigate and must find a mystery relic.

The mysterious relic they seek dates to back to the earliest of Earth’s people, the Aborigines, an ancient tribe filled with legends, lore, and secrets passed down through the ages for 40,000 years. Soon Sean and Tommy find themselves on an exhilarating adventure through the Australian outback in search of an artifact as old as time itself and they must work out What unfathomable power this relic possesses? And why a businessman in Australian wants it so badly? They must also decipher the code from a 120 year old document that could alter the course of history of a nation and put incredible power in the hands of a madman.

Mage Slave by R.K.Thorne

I would also like to read the exciting fantasy adventure Mage Slave by R. K. Thorne. Mage Slave is the first novel in the Enslaved Chronicles trilogy and the novel is an epic tale of swords and sorcery with a side of romance. It features A warrior prince, an enslaved mage, whose destinies are both caught up in Magic, politics, love,  fate and a villainous plot to draw the world to war.

It concerns Crown Prince Aven Lanuken a noble but naive prince, who wants something more than a trophy for a future wife. He wants a woman who will be more friend than follower. A queen who will be more warrior than diplomat. He wants a partner he can trust… with a dangerous secret that’s kept him trapped in a dark mountain fortress his entire life.

Meanwhile a fierce and angry, Mage slave named Miara wants something more, too—to find an enemy prince. And not to marry him. She’s just received orders for her very first kidnapping. She loathes the idea of it, and it’s probably a suicide mission. But she has never failed a mission before and doesn’t intend to start now. However something unexpected happens on her latest mission,  Of all the women in the world, why does Aven Lanuken have to fall for this one ?

Their Fatal Secrets By Janice Frost

I would like to read Their Fatal Secrets by Janice Frost. This Is a gripping crime mystery By Janice Frost which is available Free Gratis with Amazon Kindle Unlimited. It begins when Two drunk students discover The body of Leanne Jackson in the River Strom after having been hit on the head with a flat iron. Soon after, the body of Ruby Kennedy is also found dead in similar circumstances. Jess Stokes was bullied at school and was befriended by Leanne who came to her rescue. Jess is determined to discover who killed her friend and find out if there’s a connection between Leanne and Ruby. Then strange things start to happen – her car is vandalised, her friend’s dog is killed – is this connected to her friend’s death.

Meanwhile DEtective Superintendent Ava Merry and Detective Inspector Jim Neal are assigned to both investigations. And they’re joined by a new detective, Tom KnightDI Jim Neal and DS Ava Merry investigate the deaths of the two women, joined by DS Tom Knight who’s been seconded from Hertfordshire and DC Polly ‘PJ’ Jenkins. DS Ava Merry is a young policewoman, recently promoted to detective sergeant. She is fitness fanatic with a taste for dangerous relationships. DI Jim Neal is single dad who juggles his devotion to his job with caring for his son.

Upon investigation It becomes clear that the victim had been looking into things that had happened in her past and was trying to contact other women she had known at the time. Then another body is found in the river and she was on the first victim’s list of contacts. Soon a connection is found between the two dead women. A list of “victims” is discovered in one of their flats. Who will be next and what really happened to the women on this sinister list? Jim Neal ends up fighting for his life as the two detectives struggle to solve a complex case involving people with secrets that may prove fatal.