International Day of people with a disability

International Day of People with Disability is an international observance which takes palce annually on 3 December and is promoted by the United Nations since 1992. It aims of International Day of people with disability are to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.Over one billion people, or approximately 15 per cent of the world’s population, live with some form of disability. Persons with disabilities, “the world’s largest minority”, often face barriers to participation in all aspects of society. Barriers can take a variety of forms, including those relating to the physical environment or to information and communications technology (ICT), or those resulting from legislation or policy, or from societal attitudes or discrimination. The result is that persons with disabilities do not have equal access to society or services, including education, employment, health care, transportation, political participation or justice.

Evidence and experience shows that when barriers to their inclusion are removed and persons with disabilities are empowered to participate fully in societal life, their entire community benefits. Barriers faced by persons with disabilities are, therefore, a detriment to society as a whole, and accessibility is necessary to achieve progress and development for all.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) recognizes that the existence of barriers constitutes a central component of disability. Under the Convention, disability is an evolving concept that “results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others.”Accessibility and inclusion of persons with disabilities are fundamental rights recognized by the CRPD and are not only objectives, but also pre-requisites for the enjoyment of other rights. The CRPD (Article 9, accessibility) seeks to enable persons with disabilities to live independently and participate fully in all aspects of life and development. It calls upon States Parties to take appropriate measures to ensure that persons with disabilities have access to all aspects of society, on an equal basis with others, as well as to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers to accessibility. In spite of this, in many parts of the world today, lack of awareness and understanding of accessibility as a cross-cutting development issue remains an obstacle to the achievement of progress and development through the Millennium Development Goals, as well as other internationally agreed outcomes for all.

The commemoration of International Day of Persons with Disabilities in 2012 provides an opportunity to address this exclusion by focusing on promoting accessibility and removing all types of barriers in society.Each year the day focuses on a different issue and themes from previous years have included1998: “Arts, Culture and Independent Living”1999: “Accessibility for all for the new Millennium”2000: “Making information technologies work for all”2001: “Full participation and equality: The call for new approaches to assess progress and evaluate outcome”2002: “Independent Living and Sustainable Livelihoods”2003: “A Voice of our Own”2004: “Nothing about Us, Without Us”2005: “Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Action in Development”2006: “E-Accessibility”2007: “Decent Work for Persons with Disabilities”2008: “Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Dignity and justice for all of us”2009: “Making the MDGs Inclusive: Empowerment of persons with disabilities and their communities around the world”2010: “Keeping the promise: Mainstreaming disability in the Millennium Development Goals towards 2015 and beyond”2011: “Together for a better world for all: Including persons with disabilities in development”2012: “Removing barriers to create an inclusive and accessible society for all.

In 1976, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 1981 the International Year of Disabled Persons. It called for a plan of action at the national, regional and international levels, with an emphasis on equalization of opportunities, rehabilitation and prevention of disabilities. The theme of IYDP was “full participation and equality”, defined as the right of persons with disabilities to take part fully in the life and development of their societies, enjoy living conditions equal to those of other citizens, and have an equal share in improved conditions resulting from socio-economic development. To provide a time frame during which Governments and organizations could implement the activities recommended in the World Programme of Action, the General Assembly proclaimed 1983-1992 the United Nations Decade of Disabled Persons.

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Events and holidays occurring on 1 December

  • Eat a Red Apple Day.
  • Civil Air Patrol Day
  • Day Without Art
  • World AIDS Day
  • Bifocals at the Monitor Liberation Day
  • Coats & Toys for Kids Day.

Christmas Lights Day.

Christmas Lights Day takes place annually on 1December. Christmas lights (also known as fairy lights) are lights used for decoration in celebration of Christmas, often on display throughout the Christmas season including Advent and Christmastide. The custom goes back to when Christmas trees were decorated with candles, which symbolized Christ being the light of the world; these were brought by Christians into their homes in early modern Germany.

Christmas trees displayed publicly and illuminated with electric lights became popular in the early 20th century. By the mid-20th century, it became customary to display strings of electric lights along streets and on buildings; Christmas decorations detached from the Christmas tree itself. In the United States, it became popular to outline private homes with such Christmas lights in tract housing beginning in the 1960s. By the late 20th century, the custom had also been adopted in other nations, including outside the Western world, notably in Japan and Hong Kong. Throughout Christendom, Christmas lights continue to retain their symbolism of Jesus as the light of the world.

In many countries, Christmas lights, as well as other Christmas decorations, are traditionally erected on or around the first day of Advent. In the Western Christian world, the two traditional days when Christmas lights are removed are Twelfth Night and Candlemas, the latter of which ends the Christmas-Epiphany season in some denominations. Leaving the decorations up beyond Candlemas is historically considered to be inauspicious or even bad luck.

The Christmas tree was first adopted in upper-class homes in 18th-century Germany, where it was occasionally decorated with candles, which at the time was a comparatively expensive light source. Candles for the tree were glued with melted wax to a tree branch or attached by pins. Around 1890, candleholders were first used for Christmas candles. Between 1902 and 1914, small lanterns and glass balls to hold the candles started to be used. Early electric Christmas lights were introduced with electrification, beginning in the 1880s.

The illuminated Christmas tree became established in the United Kingdom during Queen Victoria’s reign, and through emigration spread to North America and Australia. In her journal for Christmas Eve 1832, the delighted 13-year-old princess wrote, “After dinner.. we then went into the drawing-room near the dining-room. There were two large round tables on which were placed two trees hung with lights and sugar ornaments. All the presents being placed round the trees”. Until the availability of inexpensive electrical power in the early twentieth century, miniature candles were commonly, and in some cultures still are, used.

In the United Kingdom, electrically powered Christmas lights are generally known as fairy lights. In 1881, the Savoy Theatre, London was the first building in the world to be lit entirely by electricity. Sir Joseph Swan, pioneer of the incandescent light bulb, supplied about 1,200 Swan incandescent lamps, and a year later, the Savoy owner Richard D’Oyly Carte equipped the principal fairies with miniature lighting supplied by the Swan United Electric Lamp Company, for the opening night of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera Iolanthe on 25 November 1882. The term ‘fairy lights’, describing ‘a small coloured light used in illuminations’ had already entered English and  has been common since.

The first known electrically illuminated Christmas tree was the creation of Edward H. Johnson, an associate of inventor Thomas Edison. While he was vice president of the Edison Electric Light Company, a predecessor of today’s Con Edison electric utility, he had Christmas tree light bulbs especially made for him. He proudly displayed his Christmas tree, which was hand-wired with 80 red, white and blue electric incandescent light bulbs the size of walnuts, on December 22, 1882 at his home on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Local newspapers ignored the story, seeing it as a publicity stunt. However, it was published by a Detroit newspaper reporter, and Johnson has become widely regarded as the Father of Electric Christmas Tree Lights. By 1900, businesses started stringing up Christmas lights behind their windows. Christmas lights were too expensive for the average person; as such, electric Christmas lights did not become the majority replacement for candles until 1930.

In 1895, U.S. President Grover Cleveland proudly sponsored the first electrically lit Christmas tree in the White House. It was a huge specimen, featuring more than a hundred multicolored lights. The first commercially produced Christmas tree lamps were manufactured in strings of multiples of eight sockets by the General Electric Co. of Harrison, New Jersey. Each socket took a miniature two-candela carbon-filament lamp.

The use of Indoor electrically illuminated Christmas trees, grew  in the United States and elsewhere. San Diego in 1904, Appleton, Wisconsin in 1909, and New York City in 1912 were the first recorded instances of the use of Christmas lights outside. McAdenville, North Carolina claims to have been the first in 1956.  The Library of Congress credits the town for inventing “the tradition of decorating evergreen trees with Christmas lights dates back to 1956 when the McAdenville Men’s Club conceived of the idea of decorating a few trees around the McAdenville Community Center.” Although the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree has had lights” since 1931, but did not have real electric lights until 1956. Philadelphia’s Christmas Light Show and Disney’s Christmas Tree also began in 1956. Though General Electric sponsored community lighting competitions during the 1920s, it would take until the mid-1950s for the use of such lights to be adopted by average households.

Gradually strings of Christmas lights were used elsewhere. Soon, strings of lights adorned mantles and doorways inside homes, and ran along the rafters, roof lines, and porch railings of homes and businesses, many city skyscrapers are decorated with long mostly-vertical strings of a common theme. In 1963, The town of Greenville, North Carolina boycotted Christmas Lights In protest of the segregation that kept blacks from being employed by downtown businesses in Greenville, this became Known as the Black Christmas (boycott) or “Christmas Sacrifice”. In 1973 during the OPEC’s Oil Embargo President Nixon asked Americans not to put up Christmas lights as a way to conserve energy use. In the mid-2000s, a video Featuring the home of Carson Williams, festooned with a large number of fairy lights, was shown in a Williams Television Commercial. The commercial impressed many and Williams was subsequently commissioned to decorate Denver shopping center With 250,000 lights, as well as many parks and zoos.

World AIDS day

World AIDS Day, takes place annually on December . World AIDS day is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection, and mourn those who have died of the disease. Government and health officials, non-governmental organizations and individuals around the world observe the day, often with education on AIDS prevention and control.

Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a spectrum of conditions caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following initial infection, a person may not notice any symptoms or may experience a brief period of influenza-like illness, followed by a prolonged period with no apparent symptoms. As the infection progresses, it interferes more with the immune system, increasing the risk of developing common infections such as tuberculosis, as well as other opportunistic infections, and tumors that rarely affect people who have working immune systems. These late symptoms of infection are referred to as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This stage is often also associated with unintended weight loss.

HIV is spread primarily by unprotected sex (including anal and oral sex), contaminated blood transfusions, hypodermic needles, and from mother to child during pregnancy, delivery, or breastfeeding.  Some bodily fluids, such as saliva and tears, do not transmit HIV. Methods of prevention include safe sex, needle exchange programs, treating those who are infected, and male circumcision. Disease in a baby can often be prevented by giving both the mother and child antiretroviral medication. There is no cure or vaccine; however, antiretroviral treatment can slow the course of the disease and may lead to a near-normal life expectancy. Treatment is recommended as soon as the diagnosis is made. Without treatment, the average survival time after infection is 11 years.

As of 2016, about 36.7 million people were living with HIV which resulted in 1 million deaths. There were 300,000 fewer new HIV cases in 2016 than in 2015. Most of those infected live in sub-Saharan Africa. From the time AIDS was identified in the early 1980s to 2017, the disease has caused an estimated 35 million deaths worldwide. HIV/AIDS is considered a pandemic—a disease outbreak which is present over a large area and is actively spreading. HIV originated in west-central Africa during the late 19th or early 20th century. AIDS was first recognized by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1981 and its cause—HIV infection—was identified in the early part of the decade.

HIV/AIDS has had a great impact on society, both as an illness and as a source of discrimination. The disease also has large economic impacts. There are many misconceptions about HIV/AIDS such as the belief that it can be transmitted by casual non-sexual contact. The disease has become subject to many controversies involving religion including the Catholic Church’s position not to support condom use as prevention. It has attracted international medical and political attention as well as large-scale funding since being identified in the 1980s.

World AIDS Day was first conceived in August 1987 by James W. Bunn and Thomas Netter, two public information officers for the Global Programme on AIDS at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. Bunn and Netter took their idea to Dr. Jonathan Mann, Director of the Global Programme on AIDS (now known as UNAIDS). Dr. Mann liked the concept, approved it, and agreed with the recommendation that the first observance of World AIDS Day should be on December 1, 1988. Bunn, a former television broadcast journalist from San Francisco, had recommended the date of December 1 that believing it would maximize coverage of World AIDS Day by western news media, sufficiently long following the US elections but before the Christmas holidays.

In its first two years, the theme of World AIDS Day focused on children and young people. While the choice of this theme was criticized at the time by some for ignoring the fact that people of all ages may become infected with HIV, the theme helped alleviate some of the stigma surrounding the disease and boost recognition of the problem as a family disease. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) became operational in 1996, and it took over the planning and promotion of World AIDS Day. Rather than focus on a single day, UNAIDS created the World AIDS Campaign in 1997 to focus on year-round communications, prevention and education. In 2004, the World AIDS Campaign became an independent organization. Each year, Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI have released a greeting message for patients and doctors on World AIDS Day. In the US, the White House began marking World AIDS Day with the iconic display of a 28-foot AIDS Ribbon on the building’s North Portico in 2007. The display, now an annual tradition, and was the first banner, sign or symbol to prominently hang from the White House since the Abraham Lincoln administration.

As of 2013, AIDS has killed more than 36 million people worldwide (1981-2012), and an estimated 35.3 million people are living with HIV, making it one of the most important global public health issues in recorded history. Despite recent improved access to antiretroviral treatment in many regions of the world, the AIDS epidemic claims an estimated 2 million lives each year, of which about 270,000 are children. World AIDS Day is one of the eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Malaria Day and World Hepatitis Day. Since 1995, the President of the United States has made an official proclamation on World AIDS Day.


DAY WITHOUT ART

Day Without Art (DWA) is an annual event held by art museums and other organizations organize programs in order to raise awareness of AIDS, remember people who have died, and inspire positive action. Day Without Art was created on December 1, 1989 as the national day of action and mourning in response to the AIDS crisis, which had rapidly and conspicuously decimated the artistic community and to remind the public  that AIDS can touch everyone, and inspire positive action, some 800 U.S. art and AIDS groups participated in the first Day Without Art, shutting down museums, sending staff to volunteer at AIDS services, or sponsoring special exhibitions of work about AIDS. Since then, Day Without Art has grown into a collaborative project in which an estimated 8,000 national and international museums, galleries, art centers, AIDS service organizations, libraries, high schools and colleges take part.

In the past, “Visual AIDS” initiated public actions and programs, published an annual poster and copyright-free broadsides, and acted as press coordinator and clearing house for projects for Day Without Art/World AIDS Day. In 1997, it was suggested Day Without Art become a Day With Art, to recognize and promote increased programming of cultural events that draw attention to the continuing pandemic. Though “the name was retained as a metaphor for the chilling possibility of a future day without art or artists”, we added parentheses to the program title, Day With(out) Art, to highlight the proactive programming of art projects by artists living with HIV/AIDS, and art about AIDS, that were taking place around the world. It had become clear that active interventions within the annual program were far more effective than actions to negate or reduce the programs of cultural centers. In 2014, the Los Angeles art collective, My Barbarian, staged a video performance in remembrance of Pedro Zamora, inspired by the theorist, José Esteban Muñoz’s theory of counterpublicity.

Perpetual Youth Day

Perpetual Youth Day takes Place annaully on November 30 The purpose of Perpetual Youth day is to educate people concerning good health practices to improve your looks, health and quality of life. It doesn’t have to be anything too drastic Even small changes in the way you live can improve your life. Being beautiful isn’t all about makeup, hair dye, and the right clothes. It’s also about good health. The healthier you are, the better you will look. Change your lifestyle and you’ll be prettier. Here are some tried and true tips for looking your best:

  • Give up Smoking -this can ruin your skin and hair — The primary reason to not smoke — or stop if you do — is to prevent potentially fatal diseases, including cancer and stroke. smoking also damages the microcirculation to the skin and hair, And can lead to early wrinkles, especially around the mouth.
  • Reduce Alcohol consumption- Too much alcohol consumption can cause weight gain — What you drink and how much you drink affect the size of your waistline. The type of alcohol that’s consumed seems to contribute differently to the accumulation of abdominal fat. Alcohol can also damage your liver if drunk in sufficient quantities.
  • Take Vitamins -Taking vitamins can help your skin look healthy — If you want a complexion that glows, take your vitamins. Sometimes that means popping a vitamin pill and other times it means eating the right food. A healthy diet can be a fountain of youth for thr skin. Eat well and your skin will be moist, clear, and glowing. Eat poorly and it will be dry, pale, scaly, or oily.
  • Exercise regularly-this will not only keep you in shape, but also give you poise and make your skin glow. If you walk briskly for 30 minutes a day, you may never gain another pound,
  • Avoid too much sun- Sun provides Vitamin D which is necessary for the production of Vitamin C which are both important for good health, however too much sun exposure can cause health problems, so Cover up with clothing or sun screen. The sun’s ultraviolet rays break down the skin’s collagen, which makes the skin thinner and allows wrinkles to form. Too much ultraviolet light and radiation from sunlight can also cause cancer.
  • Get more Sleep -Sleep is extremeley important for wellbeing, general health and body repairs. So make sure you get enough, which is at least seven to eight hours a night. If you don’t get enough shut-eye, you could also have problems with memory and concentration.
  • Learn how to deal with stress— Stress can have a negative impact on your health and can show on your face and in your posture. Learn how to deal with the big and little stresses you face in your life. Stress is the most common health problem reported by women.
  • Smile and say cheese — Take care of your teeth. Brush, floss, and see the dentist every six months for a check-up. The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry offers this advice to keep your teeth white: Avoid drinking too much coffee or red wine and use toothpaste that has hydrogen peroxide or baking soda.

World Toilet Day

World Toilet Day (WTD) is celebrated on 19 November. The purpose of World Toilet day is to raise awareness of the global sanitation crisis, to inspire people to take steps to address the global sanitation crisis and raise awareness of the billions of people who do not have access to a toilet. The aims of World Toilet Day include Creating awareness of the global sanitation crisis, inspiring action around the world to improve sanitation, encouraging UN-Water Members and Partners to take collaborative action. Strengthening the voice of the UN system on WASH-related issues, Increasing awareness and knowledge of water and sanitation and improving sanitation for households and communities.

World Toilet Organization (WTO) was founded by Jack Sim in 2001 who declared 19 November as World Toilet Day (WTD). In the following years, the WTO began pushing for global recognition for World Toilet Day. In 2007 the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) began to actively support WTD and promote awareness. In 2013, a joint initiative between the Government of Singapore and the World Toilet Organization led to Singapore’s first United Nations resolution, named “Sanitation for All”. This resolution calls for collective action to end the world’s sanitation crisis. World Toilet Day was declared an official United Nations day when it was adopted by 122 countries at the 67th session of the UN General Assembly in New York.

Lack of access to sanitation (toilets) has a profound impact on public health, dignity, and safety. Open defecation contributes to the spread of many serious and fatal diseases such as soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrhea and schistosomiasis. Stunted growth in children is another problem when children are being exposed to human feces when toilets are absent, ineffective or not used. An analysis of 145 countries estimated that 58% of all cases of diarrhea were caused by unsafe water, poor sanitation and poor hygiene practices, including inadequate handwashing. This has resulted in more than 526,000 children under the age of 5 dying from water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) related diarrhea in 2015 alone. This means, nearly 1,400 children die each day. Providing sanitation has been estimated to lower the odds of children suffering diarrhea and has lowered under-five mortality This is because preventing human contact with feces in the environment prevents many diseases.

Lack of toilets in schools and health facilities is also a problem in many developing countries. According to the World Health Organization, 19% of health care facilities in low and middle income country settings lack improved sanitation; 35% lack access to water and soap for handwashing. The absence of water and sanitation make it difficult to provide routine medical services and to prevent and control infection. The provision of clean and safe school toilets (together with water and hygiene in schools) significantly reduces hygiene related disease, increases student attendance and contributes to dignity and gender equality. However, more than half of all primary schools in the developing countries with available data do not have improved water facilities and nearly two thirds lack improved sanitation.

World Toilet Day aims to inspire people to take action on these issues related to the lack of toilets. Now Thanks to initiatives like World Toilet Day, the importance of toilets for sustainable development is being recognized more and more. For example, the Sustainable Development Goals from 2015 include a target under Goal 6 to ensure everyone everywhere has access to toilets by 2030. This is done through public communications, campaigns, reports and events. Worldwide, 4.5 billion people live without “safely managed sanitation.” The global sanitation crisis affects people in developing countries the most. World Toilet Day is a call to action. The right to water and sanitation was officially declared a human right by the UN on 28 July 2010. World Toilet Day was established by the World Toilet Organization in 2001. In 2013, the UN passed a resolution recognizing World Toilet Day as an official UN international day and The activities and action for World Toilet Day are coordinated by UN-Water. In 2015, as part of Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Goal number 6 (SDG 6) was launched. This goal commits the world to “ensure access to water and sanitation for all” by 2030. The universal provision of effective toilets is now recognized as a global development priority at the highest political level.

World Prematurity Day

World Prematurity Day is observed annually on 17 November to raise awareness of preterm birth and the concerns of preterm babies and their families worldwide. The first international awareness day for preterm birth was created by European parent organizations in 2008. It has been celebrated as World Prematurity Day since 2010.

Preterm birth, also known as premature birth, is the birth of a baby at fewer than 37 weeks’ gestational age. Symptoms of preterm labor include uterine contractions which occur more often than every ten minutes or the leaking of fluid from the vagina. Premature infants are at greater risk for cerebral palsy, delays in development, hearing problems and sight problems. These risks are greater the earlier a baby is born. Approximately 15 million babies are born preterm each year, accounting for about one in 10 of all babies born worldwide.

The cause of preterm birth is often not known. Risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, being pregnant with more than one baby, being either obese or underweight, a number of vaginal infections, tobacco smoking and psychological stress, among other It is recommended that labor not be medically induced before 39 weeks unless required for other medical reasons. The same recommendation applies to cesarean section. Medical reasons for early delivery include preeclampsia

In those at risk, the hormone progesterone, if taken during pregnancy, may prevent preterm birth.Evidence does not support the usefulness of bed rest. It is estimated that at least 75% of preterm infants would survive with appropriate treatment, and the survival rate is highest among the infants born the latest. In women who might deliver between 24 and 37 weeks, corticosteroids improve outcomes. A number of medications, including nifedipine, may delay delivery so that a mother can be moved to where more medical care is available and the corticosteroids have a greater chance to work Once the baby is born, care includes keeping the baby warm through skin to skin contact, supporting breastfeeding, treating infections and supporting breathing.

Preterm birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide. About 15 million babies are preterm each year (5% to 18% of all deliveries). Approximately 0.5% of births are extremely early periviable births, and these account for most of the deaths. In many countries, rates of premature births have increased between the 1990s and 2010s. Complications from preterm births resulted in 0.81 million deaths in 2015 down from 1.57 million in 1990. The chance of survival at 22 weeks is about 6%, while at 23 weeks it is 26%, 24 weeks 55% and 25 weeks about 72%.The chances of survival without any long-term difficulties are lower.

Urgent action is always requested to address preterm birth given that the first country-level estimates show that globally 15 million babies are born too soon and rates are increasing in most countries. Preterm birth is critical for progress on Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG) for child survival by 2015 and beyond, and gives added value to maternal health (MDG 5) investments also linking to non-communicable diseases. For preterm babies who survive, the additional burden of prematurity-related disability may affect families and health systems.

Parent groups, families, health professionals, politicians, hospitals, organisations and other stakeholders involved in preterm birth observe this day with media campaigns, local events and other activities conducted on local, regional, national or international level to raise awareness among the public. In 2013, WPD was celebrated in over 60 countries.


More Holidays and National Days taking Place on 17 November include

  • Little Mermaid Day 2018.
  • National Farm Joke Day.
  • World Peace Day
  • National Take a Hike Day.
  • National Survivors of Suicide Day.
  • national Unfriend Day.
  • Family Volunteer Day
  • Homemade Bread Day.
  • International Games Day.
  • International Students’ Day.
  • National Adoption Day.
  • National Baklava Day.

Loosen up and Lighten up Day

Loosen up, Lighten up day takes place annually on 14 November. The purpose of Loosen up, Lighten up Day is to remind people that sometimes you have to take things easy, relax, and focus on your own personal wellbeing in order to remain healthy. Modern life can be very stressful, as the needs of family and work life stretch us to breaking point. However although routine and precision are very useful Life shouldn’t all be about work, deadlines and the rat race; it should also be about relaxing, looking after our health, happiness and contentment otherwise Stress, anxiety and worry are bad for your health and eventually send you to an early grave. What is the point of working yourself into the ground if you’re not going to take the time to enjoy life? Life is there to be lived, and it is too short to be allowed to slip by. New experiences open your mind to a world of possibilities, helping you achieve the ultimate human goal – happiness. a balance has to be found between work and relaxation.

One way to relax and unwind is to take time to cook (unless you own a restaurant or hotel). In the developed world, too many people rely on pre-packaged, convenience food for their meals, which are often laden with salt, sugar, fat and preservatives. Not only is cooking a wholesome, nutritious meal better for your health, the process involved is good for your self-esteem – namely, the sense of achievement that comes with successfully preparing a meal. Moreover, cooking a meal to share with those closest to you can be very good for your overall wellbeing – there are few activities more rewarding than preparing a tasty and nutritious meal for friends and/or family.

Another way to loosen up and lighten up is to exercise regularly, this along with a healthy diet, will help you to regulate your weight and keep you healthy, happy and full of energy. Exercise doesn’t have to mean spending hours at a time in the gym; it can be something as simple as going for a brisk walk in the country or by the sea. It can also be done in the home, and integrated into your daily life.

Relaxing is another good way to lighten up and loosen up. The only way to truly relax is to set aside time during which you won’t be disturbed. Relaxation is a very personal goal, so you need to discover what truly relaxes you. You might find that a massage or spa treatment soothes your senses; some people, on the other hand, find that deep breathing exercises and meditation work. Listening to classical or slow-paced music can also lower blood pressure, anxiety and heart rate and help you relax. Other ways to unwind include watching a favourite TV show, going to yoga classes or reading a good book

Another good way loosen up and lighten up is to Seek new experiences and try something new. Experiencing new things can reinvigorate you, and change the way you approach your entire way of life. This can include doing something you have always wanted to try, but have never had the time or motivation. Loosen up, Lighten up day is an opportunity to relax and restore some balance into your hectic life.

More Events and Holidays happening on November 14

  • National American Teddy Bear Day
  • International Girls Day
  • National Pickle Day
  • National Spicy Guacamole Day
  • Operating Room Nurse Day
  • Spirit of National Speakers Association Day