Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

The first of five books in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy comedy science fiction series by Douglas Adams was published on 12 October 1979. The series follows the misadventures of Arthur Dent, a hapless Englishman, Ford Prefect, an alien from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse, who named himself after the Ford Prefect car to blend in, who is a researcher for the eponymous guidebook; Zaphod Beeblebrox, Ford’s semi-cousin and the Galactic President; the depressed robot Marvin the Paranoid Android; and Trillian, formerly known as Tricia McMillan, a woman Arthur once met at a party in Islington and the only other human survivor of Earth’s destruction.

Following Earths destruction by the Vogons Arthur is rescued by Ford Prefect and they visit the legendary planet Magrathea, home to the now-collapsed planet-building industry, and meet Slartibartfast, a planetary coastline designer who was responsible for the fjords of Norway. Through archival recordings, he relates the story of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who built a computer named Deep Thought to calculate the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. When the answer was revealed to be 42, Deep Thought explained that the answer was incomprehensible because the beings didn’t know what they were asking. It went on to predict that another computer, more powerful than itself would be made to calculate the question for the answer. However This computer, was the Earth, and was destroyed by Vogons to make way for a hyperspatial express route, five minutes before the conclusion of its 10-million-year program. Two of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who commissioned the Earth in the first place, disguised themselves as Trillian’s mice, and want to dissect Arthur’s brain to help reconstruct the question, since he was part of the Earth’s matrix moments before it was destroyed, and so he is likely to have part of the question buried in his brain.

In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe , Zaphod gets separated from the others and finds he is part of a conspiracy to uncover who really runs the Universe. He then meets Zarniwoop, editor for The Guide, who knows where to find the secret ruler and is briefly reunited with the others for a trip to Milliways, the titular restaurant. Zaphod and Ford decide to steal a ship from there, however this turns out to be a stunt ship pre-programmed to plunge into a star as a special effect in a stage show and they are unable to change it’s course. Meanwhile Ford and Arthur, end up on a spacecraft full of the outcasts of the Golgafrinchan civilisation, which crashes on prehistoric Earth; leaving Ford and Arthur stranded, and it becomes clear that the inept Golgafrinchans are the ancestors of modern humans, having displaced the Earth’s indigenous hominids.

In the next novel “Life, the Universe and Everything” , Slartibartfast, enlists the aid of Ford, Arthur, Marvin, Zaphod and Trillian to prevent the people of the planet Krikkit from escaping their home planet, on which they have been imprisoned for trying to start a Galactic War and prevent them starting another Galactic War which will wipe out all life in the Universe. In the next novel “So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish”, Arthur returns home to Earth, where He meets and falls in love with a girl named Fenchurch, and discovers this Earth is a replacement provided by the dolphins in their Save the Humans campaign. Eventually he rejoins Ford, who claims to have saved the Universe in order to hitch-hike one last time and see God’s Final Message to His Creation. Along the way, they are also joined by Marvin, the Paranoid Android, who, although 37 times older than the universe itself (what with time travel and all), has just enough power left in his failing body to read the message and feel better about it all before expiring.

In the next novel “Mostly Harmless”, Vogons take over The Hitchhiker’s Guide (under the name of InfiniDim Enterprises), to finish the task of obliterating the Earth. Arthur loses Fenchurch and travels around the galaxy despondently, before crashing his spaceship on the planet Lamuella, where he settles in happily as the official sandwich-maker for a small village of simple, peaceful people. Meanwhile, Ford Prefect breaks into The Guide’s offices, gets himself an infinite expense account from the computer system, and then meets The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Mark II, an artificially intelligent, multi-dimensional guide with vast power and a hidden purpose. Trillian leaves her daughter, Random Frequent Flyer Dent with Arthur, but she then steals The Guide Mark II and uses it to get to Earth. Arthur, Ford, Trillian, and Tricia McMillan (Trillian in this alternate universe) give chase & follow her to a crowded club, where an anguished Random accidentally kills Agrajag. Soon afterwards, The Guide Mark II removes all possible Earths from probability, which is bad news for all the main characters, apart from Zaphod, who were all on Earth at the time.

The Author Eoin Colfer (Artemis) has also written a sixth instalment entitled “And Another Thing”, which sees the characters awoken from virtual reality as death rays bear down on Earth before being picked up by Zaphod and joined by Bowerick Wowbagger, the Infinitely Prolonged and Thor to deal with the Vogons who are heading to the planet Nano in order to destroy a colony of people who escaped Earth’s destruction.

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy been adapted into a humourous radio program, a “trilogy” of five books, a 1981 six part science fiction television series, Featuring many of the actors from the radio series and a 2005, film starring Martin Freeman as Arthur, Mos Def as Ford, Sam Rockwell as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Zooey Deschanel as Trillian, with Alan Rickman providing the voice of Marvin the Paranoid Android (and Warwick Davis acting in Marvin’s costume), and Stephen Fry as the voice of the Guide/Narrator. Between 2004 and 2005, BBC Radio also broadcast a series based on the third fourth and fifth novels and DC Comics published a comic book adaptation.

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Orson Welles

American actor, director, writer and producer George Orson Welles Sadly died On October 10, 1985, after having a heart attack at his home in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. He was born May 6, 1915 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He worked extensively in theatre, radio and film and is best remembered for his innovative work in all three media, most notably Caesar (1937), a groundbreaking Broadway adaption of Julius Caesar and the debut of the Mercury Theatre; The War of the Worlds (1938), the most famous broadcast in the history of radio; and Citizen Kane (1941), which many critics and scholars name as the best film of all time. Welles directed a number of high-profile theatrical productions in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth and The Cradle Will Rock, but found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds performed for the radio drama anthology series Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was reported to have caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring, and although these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated, they rocketed Welles to instant notoriety. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which he wrote, produced, directed, and starred in as Charles Foster Kane. It is often considered the greatest film ever made. Welles went on to directed thirteen critically acclaimed films in his career, including The Magnificent Ambersons, Journey into Fear, It’s All True, The Stranger, The Lady From Shanghai, Macbeth, The Third Man, Othello, Mr Arkadin, The Trial and Touch of Evil.

He was reknowned for His distinctive directorial style, which featured layered and nonlinear narrative forms, innovative uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unusual camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots, and long takes. He has been praised as a major creative force and as “the ultimate auteur.” Welles became Well known for his baritone voice, And was also a well regarded actor who won many wards. These other Welles films were nominated for their list: The Magnificent Ambersons (1942, director/producer/screenwriter); The Third Man (1949, actor); Touch of Evil (1958, actor/director/ screenwriter); and A Man for All Seasons (1966, actor). Citizen Kane was also nominated for numerous prizes at the 1941 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor in a Leading Role. The only Oscar won, however, was Best Original Screenplay, which Welles shared with Herman J. Mankiewicz.The Magnificent Ambersons was nominated for four 1942 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The Stranger was nominated for the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1947. Othello won the Palme d’Or at the 1952 Cannes Film Festival.

In 1968 Welles was nominated for Best Foreign Actor in a Leading Role at the 21st British Academy Film Awards for his performance in Chimes at Midnight. Welles was given the first Career Golden Lion award in the Venice Film Festival in 1970, during the same year Welles was given an Academy Honorary Award for “superlative and distinguished service in the making of motion pictures.He was also awarded the French Légion d’honneur, the highest civilian decoration in France. He also recieved the American Film Institute Lifetime Achievement Award in 1975, and In 1978, Welles was presented with the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Career Achievement Award. In 1979, Welles was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame. In 1982, Welles was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture at the Golden Globe Awards for his role in Butterfly, and won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Recording for his role on Donovan’s Brain.

Welles was awarded a Fellowship of the British Film Institute in 1983 and In 1984, Welles was given the Directors Guild of America Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Welles as the 16th Greatest Male Star of All Time. When asked to describe Welles’s influence, Jean-Luc Godard remarked: “Everyone will always owe him everything.” Welles was also voted the greatest film director of all time in two separate British Film Institute polls among directors and critics, and a wide survey of critical consensus, best-of lists, and historical retrospectives calls him the most acclaimed director of all time. He was also voted number 16 in AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Stars list of the greatest American film actors of all time and The American Film.

Frank Herbert

Prolific American science fiction author Frank Patrick Herbert, Jr. Was born October 8, 1920 in Tacoma, Washington. Because of a poor home environment, he ran away from home in 1938 to live with an aunt and uncle in Salem, Oregon. Heenrolled in high school at Salem High School (now North Salem High School), where he graduated in 1939. In 1939 he lied about his age to get his first newspaper job at the Glendale Star. He returned to Salem in 1940 where he worked for the Oregon Statesman newspaper (now Statesman Journal) in a variety of positions, including photographer. He also served in the U.S. Navy’s Seabees for six months as a photographer during World War II, then he was given a medical discharge. He married Flora Parkinson in San Pedro, California in 1940. They had a daughter, Penny (b. February 16, 1942), but divorced in 1945.

After the war Herbert attended the University of Washington, where he met Beverly Ann Stuart at a creative writing class in 1946. Herbert had sold two pulp adventure stories to magazines, the first to Esquire in 1945, and Stuart had sold a story to Modern Romance magazine. They married in Seattle, Washington on June 20, 1946 and had two sons, Brian Patrick Herbert (b. June 29, 1947, Seattle, Washington) and Bruce Calvin Herbert (b. June 26, 1951, Santa Rosa, California d. June 15, 1993, San Rafael, California, a gay rights activist who died of AIDS). In 1949 Herbert and his wife moved to California to work on the Santa Rosa Press-Democrat. Here they befriended the psychologists Ralph and Irene Slattery who introduced Herbert to several thinkers including Freud, Jung, Jaspers and Heidegger; who familiarized Herbert with Zen Buddhism and also influenced his writing.

After failing to graduate from University He returned to journalism and worked at the Seattle Star and the Oregon Statesman. He was a writer and editor for the San Francisco Examiner’s California Living magazine for a decade. Herbert also started reading science fiction, his favourite authors were H. G. Wells, Robert A. Heinlein, Poul Anderson and Jack Vance and His first science fiction story, “Looking for Something”, was published in the April 1952 edition of Startling Stories. In 1954 He wrote three more for Astounding Science Fiction and Amazing Stories and In 1955 he published Under Pressure in Astounding Science Fiction which was issued as The Dragon in the Sea, and explored sanity and madness in the environment of a 21st-century submarine and predicted worldwide conflicts over oil consumption and production. Herbert also worked as a speechwriter for Republican senator Guy Cordon.

In 1959 Herbert began researching for the epic novel Dune. The idea originated from a magazine article he wrote on the Oregon Dunes near Florence, Oregon which gradually evolved into the novel Dune, which was eventually completed after six years of research. The magazine Analog published it in two parts “Dune World” and “Prophet of Dune”. After being revised it was eventually published in hardback by the Chilton Book Company and became a critical success winning the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1965 and sharing the Hugo Award in 1966 with …And Call Me Conrad by Roger Zelazny. Dune was the first major ecological science fiction novel, which embraced a multitude of sweeping, inter-related themes and multiple character viewpoints in the story.

From 1969 until 1972 Herbert worked as the Seattle Post-Intelligencer’s education writer and lectured in general studies and interdisciplinary studies at the University of Washington (1970–1972). He also worked in Vietnam and Pakistan as social and ecological consultant in 1972 and was director-photographer of the television show The Tillers. By 1972, Herbert retired from newspaper writing and became a full-time fiction writer enjoying considerable commercial success. He divided his time between homes in Hawaii and Washington’s Olympic Peninsula; his home in Port Townsend, which was intended to be an “ecological demonstration project” where he wrote numerous books and pushed ecological and philosophical ideas. He also continued his Dune saga, following it with Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, and God Emperor of Dune. Other highlights were The Dosadi Experiment, The Godmakers, The White Plague and the books he wrote in partnership with Bill Ransom: The Jesus Incident, The Lazarus Effect, and The Ascension Factor which were sequels to Destination: Void. He also helped launch the career of Terry Brooks with a very positive review of Brooks’ first novel, The Sword of Shannara, in 1977. In October 1978 Herbert was the featured speaker at the Octocon II science fiction convention at the El Rancho Tropicana in Santa Rosa, California. In 1979, he met anthropologist James Funaro and they created the Contact Conference. Sadly in 1984, his wife of 38 years Beverly Herbert died. His next novel Heretics of Dune was published in 1984 and David Lynch’s big budget film version of Dune was also released in 1984 with an A-list cast including Kyle Maclachlan, Francesca Annis, Patrick Stewart and Sting. After Beverly’s death, Herbert married Theresa Shackleford in 1985, and also published Chapterhouse: Dune, which tied up many of the saga’s story threads. His final novels the anthology Eye was published that year, and Man of Two Worlds was published posthumously

Herbert sadly died of a massive pulmonary embolism while recovering from surgery for pancreatic cancer on February 11, 1986 in Madison, Wisconsin age 65. However His legacy lives on and he has influenced many authors and film-makers and his epic Dune novels remain popular. Beginning in 2012, Herbert’s estate and WordFire Press have released four previously unpublished novels in e-book and paperback formats: High-Opp (2012), Angels’ Fall (2013), A Game of Authors (2013), and A Thorn in the Bush (2014).

Doctor Who: The woman who fell to Earth

The new series of Doctor Who began Sunday 7 October. It concerns a young chap named Ryan Sinclair who encounters a strange blue object in the woods, then PC Yasmin Khan of Sheffield Police is dispatched to investigate strange lights in the woods. Elsewhere a commuter named Graham o’Brian has trouble during a train journey when it is apparently attacked by half organic, half machine Electrical Energy being.

Then Graham encounters a strange eccentric woman who seems to be familiar with what is happening, but is behaving very erratically and keeps going on about finding her TARDIS. Meanwhile others steal the strange blue object, however they soon regret it when they find themselves in danger after encountering an alien named Tzem Sha of the Stenza who has come to Earth with a sinister agenda…

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy


A digitally remastered version of the original 1981 comedy science fiction television Series “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams is being released on DVD &Bluray with extra features and out-takes. The first part Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published 12th October 1979. The series follows the adventures of Arthur Dent, a hapless Englishman, Ford Prefect, who named himself after the Ford Prefect car to blend in with what was assumed to be the dominant life form, automobiles, and is an alien from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse and a researcher for the eponymous guidebook; Zaphod Beeblebrox, Ford’s semi-cousin and the Galactic President; the depressed robot Marvin the Paranoid Android; and Trillian, formerly known as Tricia McMillan, a woman Arthur once met at a party in Islington and the only other human survivor of Earth’s destruction.

Following Earths destruction by the Vogons the characters visit the legendary planet Magrathea, home to the now-collapsed planet-building industry, and meet Slartibartfast, a planetary coastline designer who was responsible for the fjords of Norway. Through archival recordings, he relates the story of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who built a computer named Deep Thought to calculate the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. When the answer was revealed to be 42, Deep Thought explained that the answer was incomprehensible because the beings didn’t know what they were asking. It went on to predict that another computer, more powerful than itself would be made to calculate the question for the answer. However This computer, was the Earth, and was destroyed by Vogons to make way for a hyperspatial express route, five minutes before the conclusion of its 10-million-year program. Two of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who commissioned the Earth in the first place, disguised themselves as Trillian’s mice, and want to dissect Arthur’s brain to help reconstruct the question, since he was part of the Earth’s matrix moments before it was destroyed, and so he is likely to have part of the question buried in his brain.

In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe , Zaphod gets separated from the others and finds he is part of a conspiracy to uncover who really runs the Universe. He then meets Zarniwoop, editor for The Guide, who knows where to find the secret ruler and is briefly reunited with the others for a trip to Milliways, the titular restaurant. Zaphod and Ford decide to steal a ship from there, however this turns out to be a stunt ship pre-programmed to plunge into a star as a special effect in a stage show and they are unable to change it’s course. Meanwhile Ford and Arthur, end up on a spacecraft full of the outcasts of the Golgafrinchan civilisation, which crashes on prehistoric Earth; leaving Ford and Arthur stranded, and it becomes clear that the inept Golgafrinchans are the ancestors of modern humans, having displaced the Earth’s indigenous hominids.

In the next novel “Life, the Universe and Everything” , Slartibartfast, enlists the aid of Ford, Arthur, Marvin, Zaphod and Trillian to prevent the people of the planet Krikkit from escaping their home planet, on which they have been imprisoned for trying to start a Galactic War and prevent them starting another Galactic War which will wipe out all life in the Universe. In So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, Arthur returns home to Earth, where He meets and falls in love with a girl named Fenchurch, and discovers this Earth is a replacement provided by the dolphins in their Save the Humans campaign. Eventually he rejoins Ford, who claims to have saved the Universe in order to hitch-hike one last time and see God’s Final Message to His Creation. Along the way, they are also joined by Marvin, the Paranoid Android, who, although 37 times older than the universe itself (what with time travel and all), has just enough power left in his failing body to read the message and feel better about it all before expiring.

Finally, in Mostly Harmless, Vogons take over The Hitchhiker’s Guide (under the name of InfiniDim Enterprises), to finish the task of obliterating the Earth. Arthur loses Fenchurch and travels around the galaxy despondently, before crashing his spaceship on the planet Lamuella, where he settles in happily as the official sandwich-maker for a small village of simple, peaceful people. Meanwhile, Ford Prefect breaks into The Guide’s offices, gets himself an infinite expense account from the computer system, and then meets The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Mark II, an artificially intelligent, multi-dimensional guide with vast power and a hidden purpose. Trillian leaves her daughter, Random Frequent Flyer Dent with Arthur, but she then steals The Guide Mark II and uses it to get to Earth. Arthur, Ford, Trillian, and Tricia McMillan (Trillian in this alternate universe) give chase & follow her to a crowded club, where an anguished Random accidentally kills Agrajag. Soon afterwards, The Guide Mark II removes all possible Earths from probability, which is bad news for all the main characters, apart from Zaphod, who were all on Earth at the time.

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was Originally a comedy radio broadcast, before being adapted to other formats, then over several years it gradually became an international multi-media phenomenon. Adaptations have included stage shows, a “trilogy” of five books and a 1981 six part science fiction television series, Featuring many of the actors from the radio series. Author Eoin Colfer (Artemis Fowl) wrote a sixth instalment entitled And Another Thing, which sees the characters awoken from virtual reality as death rays bear down on Earth before being picked up by Zaphod and joined by Bowerick Wowbagger, the Infinitely Prolonged and Thor to deal with the Vogons who are heading to the planet Nano in order to destroy a colony of people who escaped Earth’s destruction.

DC Comics published a comic book adaptation between 1993 and 1996 and. A2005 film version, produced and filmed in the UK starring Martin Freeman as Arthur, Mos Def as Ford, Sam Rockwell as Zaphod Beeblebrox and Zooey Deschanel as Trillian, with Alan Rickman providing the voice of Marvin the Paranoid Android (and Warwick Davis acting in Marvin’s costume), and Stephen Fry as the voice of the Guide/Narrator, was also released. Howver The plot of the film adaptation of Hitchhiker’s Guide differs widely from that of the radio show, book and television series. Between 2004 and 2005, BBC Radio also broadcast a series based on the third fourth and fifth novels.

Donald Glover

American actor, comedian, singer, writer, producer, director, rapper, and DJ. Donald McKinley Glover Jr. was born on September 25, 1983 at Edwards Air Force Base in Kern County, California .He was raised in Stone Mountain, Georgia. His mother, Beverly (née Smith), is a retired daycare provider, and his father, Donald Glover Sr.,is a retired postal worker. His parents also served as foster parents for 14 years. Glover was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness. He attended DeKalb School of the Arts and was captioned “Most Likely to Write for The Simpsons” in his high school yearbook. Glover graduated from the New York University Tisch School of the Arts with a degree in Dramatic Writing (2006) While at Tisch, Glover self-produced the independent mixtape The Younger I Get, which was not released and was disowned by Glover for being “too-raw ramblings” of what he calls a “decrepit Drake” Glover also began disc jockeying and producing electronic music under the moniker MC D—later as mcDJ—remixing Sufjan Stevens’ album Illinois.

After coming to public attention for his work with Derrick Comedy while a student at New York University, he was hired at age 23 by Tina Fey as a writer for the NBC sitcom 30 Rock. He later portrayed community college student Troy Barnes on the NBC sitcom Community. He stars in the FX series Atlanta, which he created and occasionally directed. In 2006, Glover was contacted by producer David Miner, to whom he sent writing samples including a spec script that he had written for The Simpsons. Miner and Tina Fey were impressed by Glover’s work and invited him to become a writer for the NBC sitcom 30 Rock from 2006 to 2009 and also had occasional cameo appearances. He was presented the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy Series at the February 2009 ceremony for his work on the third season.Glover’s musical stage name, Childish Gambino, came from the Wu-Tang Clan’s name generat. In 2008, he released the independent mixtape Sick Boi and unsuccessfully auditioned to play President Barack Obama on the sketch comedy program Saturday Night Live. Glover also became a member of the sketch comedy group Derrick Comedy, having appeared in their sketches on YouTube since 2006, along with Dominic Dierkes, Meggie McFadden, DC Pierson, and Dan Eckman and also appeared in their film mystery Team, With Bobby Moynihan and Aubrey Plaza

In 2009 Glover also appeared in Dan Harmon’s NBC sitcom Community, Portraying Troy Barnes, a former high school star quarterback who quickly abandons his former jock mentality and embraces his nerdy, childish side as the result of his friendship with Abed Nadir (played by Danny Pudi) Glover appeared in the first five of the season’s 13 episodes before departing.

In 2009, he released his second mixtape Poindexter. A pair of mixtapes, titled I Am Just a Rapper and I Am Just A Rapper 2, were released in close succession in 2010 and followed that July by his fifth mixtape Culdesac. In 2010, Glover performed a 30-minute set on the stand-up showcase program Comedy Central Presents. In May 2010, a fan suggested Glover for the role of Peter Parker in The Amazing Spider-Man film. Glover was not given an audition and the role instead went to Andrew Garfield. Then Comics writer Brian Michael Bendis, later announced Miles Morales, an African-American version of Spider-Man, a year later. Glover later voiced this incarnation of Spider-Man on the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series. Glover received the Rising Comedy Star award at the Just for Laughs festival in July 2010. Glover released his first extended play, titled EP, in 2011 featuring the song “Freaks and Geeks”.

Glover also hosted the mtvU Wooodie Awards, held live at South By Southwest and embarked on a nationwide tour of his IAMDONALD one man show featuring rap, comedy, and video segments. Glover appeared at the 2011 Bonnaroo Music Festival as both Childish Gambino and as a comedian, performing a set with Bill Bailey and His one-hour stand-up special, Weirdo, aired on Comedy Central. During 2011 Glover also worked with friend and film composer Ludwig Göransson on his debut studio album. Glover also released his album, Camp, in 2011, featuring the songs “Bonfire” and “Heartbeat”, Glover also released the songs “Eat Your Vegetables” and “Fuck Your Blog” and released his sixth mixtape, Royalty. The album featured several artists, including his brother Stephen, under the alias Steve G. Lover III. The single “Trouble” by British artist Leona Lewis from her album Glassheart (2012) also featured Gambino with a guest rap performance. In 2013, Glover signed on to create a music-themed show for FX titled Atlanta which he would star in, write, and executive produce. Consequently, Glover decided to reduce his work for NBC, and only appeared in the first five episodes of Community’s fifth season. Glover appeared in the romantic comedy The To Do List (2013) and guest starred in two episodes of the comedy-drama television series Girls, as a Republican who is the love interest to Lena Dunham’s character.

In 2013 He released his second studio album, Because the Internet, featuring the songs “3005”, “Crawl” and “Sweatpants” and released the short film Clapping for the Wrong Reasons, to promote the album. Additionally, a 72-page screenplay designed to sync up with the album was also released. Glover also embarked on The Deep Web Tour during 2014 and also directed the music video for the song “The Pressure” by Jhené Aiko, whose previous single, “Bed Peace”, had featured a guest appearance by Glover Who then released a mixtape titled STN MTN and an EP titled Kauai, featuring the song “Sober”. Glover also received his first Grammy nominations for Best Rap Album for Because the Internet and Best Rap Performance for “3005 at the 57th Annual Grammy Awards.

After several self-released albums and mixtapes, Glover signed to Glassnote Records in 2011. He released his first album, Camp, on November 15, 2011, to generally positive reviews. His second studio album, Because the Internet, was released on December 10, 20 Glover’s third album, “Awaken, My Love!”, was released on December 2, 2016, spawning the single “Redbone”, which peaked at number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100, and eventually earned him a Grammy Award for Best Traditional R&B Performance. Glover has also won various other accolades, For his work on Atlanta, including Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series, and Golden Globe Awards for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and Best Actor – Television Series Musical or ComedY film. In September 2016, Glover held three performances – known as the “Pharos Experience” – in Joshua Tree, California, featuring songs from his third studio album. In 2017, Glover was included on the annual Time 100 list of the most influential people in the world. In 2018, Glover released the song and video for “This Is America”, Its lyrics addressed a variety of topics including gun violence in the United States and being black in the United States, and the promo video, was directed by Japanese filmmaker and frequent collaborator Hiro Murai.

In 2018 Glover released the album Awaken, My Love!”Which contains the songs “Me and Your Mama”, “Redbone” and “Terrified”And was influenced by Funkadelic, psychedelic soul, funk and R&B music. The vinyl release featured a virtual reality headset and an accompanying app that allowed owners access to virtual reality live performances from the Pharos Experience. Awaken my Love was nominated for both the 2018 Grammy Award for Album of the Year and Best Urban Contemporary Album, while “Redbone” won for Best Traditional R&B Performance and received nominations for Record of the Year and Best R&B Song, Glover performed “Terrified” at the award show’s 60th ceremony

In 2018, Glover released the EP Summer Pack which contained the songs “Summertime Magic” and “Feels Like Summer”, the former of which is the lead single from Glover’s fourth studio album. The music video for “Feels Like Summer” was released on September 1, 2018, and features cartoon cameos from numerous prominent rappers and R&B vocalists. The video is meant to symbolize Glover’s departure from the rap community and depicts his animated rendition as he walks down a neighborhood street, passing by several big names like Will Smith, Nicki Minaj, Travis Scott, Kanye West, Beyoncé, Lil Wayne, and Michael Jackson.

Glover has appeared in many films includingMystery Team (2009), he portrays a scientist working with a team of researchers who bring someone back to life in The the science fiction horror The Lazarus Effect, he portrayed a singer in Magic Mike XXL and performed a cover of the Bruno Mars song “Marry You”. He also portrayed a Jet Propulsion Laboratory astrodynamicist in Ridley Scott’s science fiction film The Martian. Glover contributed to the soundtrack of Creed (2015) which was composed by Ludwig Göransson, providing vocals to the song “Waiting For My Moment” and co-wrote another titled “Breathe”. Glover also played Aaron Davis in the superhero film Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017). Davis is the uncle of the Miles Morales version of Spider-Man, whom Glover had voiced in the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series. The casting was described as “a surprise treat for fans” by the film’s director Jon Watts, aware of his 2010 campaign to play the superhero. In April 2017, Time named Glover to its annual “100 Most Influential People in the World.” Tina Fey wrote the entry on Glover, who she said “embodies his generation’s belief that people can be whatever they want and change what it is they want, at any time. Glover portrayed a young version of Lando Calrissian in Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018); Calrissian was previously played by Billy Dee Williams in two films in the original Star Wars trilogy. Glover will star in the upcoming 2019 remake of the epic musical Disney film The Lion King (1994) as the voice of Simba, a young lion.

Glover has been awarded various accolades, including Golden Globe Awards for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy and Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series and Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series,

Christopher Reeve

American actor, film director, producer, screenwriter, author & activist Christopher Reeve was born September 25, 1952. He achieved stardom for his acting achievements, in particular his motion-picture portrayal of the fictional superhero Superman. Reeve had been asked to audition for the leading role as Clark Kent/Superman in the big budget film, Superman: The Movie . A meeting between director Richard Donner, producer Ilya Salkind and Reeve was set in January 1977., Reeve was sent a 300-page script for the film. He accepted & was told that Marlon Brando was going to play Jor-El and Gene Hackman was going to play Lex Luthor. He based his portrayal of Clark Kent on Cary Grant in his role in Bringing Up Baby & felt that the new Superman ought to reflect a contemporary male image. Although Reeve was a talented all-around athlete, portraying the role of Superman was a stretch for him, but he was tall enough for the role & had the necessary blue eyes and handsome features. However, his physique was slim & he went through an intense two-month training regimen supervised by former British weightlifting champion David Prowse, (Darth Vader). Despite landing the role, Reeve was never a comic book fan, though he had watched Adventures of Superman starring George Reeves.

The film was a worldwide hit & Reeve won a BAFTA Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles & became an instant international star. He also guest starred in Smallville, about Clark Kent/Superman’s childhood. He appeared as Doctor Virgil Swann, in two episodes titled “Rosetta” and “Legacy”, while his death was made known in the fourth season episode “Sacred”.Reeve’s first role after 1978′s Superman was as Richard Collier in the 1980 romantic fantasy Somewhere in Time which co-starred Jane Seymour . Sadly reviews savaged the film as overly sentimental & melodramatic, however thanks to screenings on cable networks and video rentals; its popularity began to grow and it has since gone on to become something of a cult classic. Director Jean-Pierre Dorléac was also nominated for an Academy Award in Costume Design for the movie.In 1980 Reeves played the lead in the successful play The Front Page,as well as a disabled Vietnam veteran in the critically acclaimed Broadway play Fifth of July. In his research for the role, he was coached by an amputee on how to walk on artificial legs. After The Fifth of July, Reeve played a novice playwright opposite Michael Caine in Sidney Lumet’s film Deathtrap, Reeve was then offered the role of Basil Ransom in The Bostonians alongside Vanessa Redgrave. In 1984, Reeve appeared in The Aspern Papers with Vanessa Redgrave and played Tony in The Royal Family and the Count in Marriage of Figaro.

In 1985, Reeve hosted the television documentary Dinosaur! having been Fascinated with dinosaurs since he was a kid. DC Comics also named Reeve as one of the honorees in the company’s 50th anniversary publication Fifty Who Made DC Great for his work on the Superman film series. In 1986 He starred opposite Morgan Freeman, in the film Street Smart, for which Freeman was nominated for his first Academy Award. The film also received excellent reviews.Reeve was very active and went sailing, scuba diving, skiing, aviation, windsurfing, cycling, gliding, parasailing, mountain climbing, Played baseball, tennis and went horse riding after learning to ride for the film Anna Karenina, he also built a sailboat, The Sea Angel, which he sailed from the Chesapeake to Nova Scotia. He was also a licensed pilot and flew solo across the Atlantic twice, & also raced his sailplane in his free time and joined The Tiger Club, a group of aviators who had served in the Royal Air Force in the Battle of Britain, who let him participate in mock dogfights in vintage World War I combat planes. He was approached by The producers of the film The Aviator to fly a Stearman in the film, Reeve readily accepted the role and did all of his stunts.

He also served as a board member for the Charles Lindbergh Fund, which promotes environmentally safe technologies, & lent support to causes such as Amnesty International, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and People for the American Way. He joined the Environmental Air Force and was also awarded The Bernardo O’Higgins Order and the Obie Prize and the Annual Walter Brielh Human Rights Foundation award, for helping to save the lives of 77 Actors in Santiago during 1987. Reeve was a member of the Creative Coalition, an organization designed to teach celebrities how to speak knowledgeably about political issues. along with Susan Sarandon, Alec Baldwin, and Blythe Danner. In 1990, Reeve starred in the Civil War film, The Rose and the Jackal, in which he played Allan Pinkerton, the head of President Lincoln’s new Secret Service, he was also offered the part of Lewis in The Remains of the Day. The film was deemed an instant classic and was nominated for eight Academy Awards. In 1994, Reeve was elected as a co-president of the Creative Coalition. Reeve was also asked by the Democratic Party to run for the United States Congress. He also went to New Mexico to shoot Speechless (co-starring Michael Keaton). Reeve also played a paralyzed police officer in Above Suspicion. He research the role at a rehabilitation hospital and learned how to use a wheelchair to get in and out of cars. Reeve was then offered the lead in Kidnapped and also planned to direct a romantic comedy entitled Tell Me True until his life took An unexpected turn…

Not long after making these plans, Reeve was invited to compete in the Commonwealth Dressage and Combined Training Association finals at the Commonwealth Park equestrian center in Culpeper, Virginia . He took horse riding seriously and was intensely competitive with it and finished fourth out of 27 in the dressage, before walking his cross-country course. He was concerned about jumps sixteen and seventeen, but paid little attention to the third jump, which was a routine three-foot-three fence shaped like the letter ‘W’. Sadly during the event On May 27, 1995, Reeve’s horse refused to jump the 3rd fence and Reeve fell and sustained a cervical spinal injury that paralyzed him from the neck down. He had no recollection of the incident but landed headfirst on the other side of the fence. His helmet prevented any brain damage, but the impact of his 215-pound (98 kg) body hitting the ground shattered his first and second vertebrae which meant that his skull and spine were not connected. When paramedics arrived he was taken to the local hospital, then flown by helicopter to the University of Virginia Medical Center. He had an operation to reattach his skull to his spine.Reeve was taken to the Kessler Rehabilitation Center in West Orange, New Jersey. At the Institute, one of his aides was a Jamaican man named Glenn Miller, nicknamed Juice, who helped him learn how to get into the shower and how to use a powered wheelchair, which was activated by blowing air through a straw. Reeve had occupational therapy and physical therapy in rehab. In the therapy gym, Reeve worked on moving his trapezius muscle, every day he would try to do better. The most difficult part of rehabilitation was respiratory therapy, the ammount of air Reeve could inhale had to be 750 ccs before getting off the artificial respirator could even be considered. Initially, Reeve could hardly get above zero. By the end of October, he was able to get around 50 ccs. This inspired him, and he felt his natural competitive edge coming back. The next day, he went up to 450 ccs. He reached 560 ccs the day after, and by December 13, 1995, Reeve was able to breathe without a ventilator for 30 minutes.

In July 2003, Christopher Reeve’s continuing frustration with the pace of stem cell research in the U.S. led him to Israel,which was at the center of research in spinal cord injury, He was invited by Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs to seek out the best treatment for his condition. During his visit, Reeve called the experience “a privilege” and said, “Israel has very proactive rehab facilities, excellent medical schools and teaching hospitals, and an absolutely first-rate research infrastructure.” Throughout his intensive tour, Reeve visited ALYN Hospital, Weizmann Institute of Science, and Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, among many other places. Israelis were very receptive to Reeve’s visit, calling him an inspiration to all and urging him to never give up hope.Reeve left Kessler feeling deeply inspired by the other patients he had met. Because he was constantly being covered by the media, he realized that he could use his name to the benefit of everyone with spinal cord injuries. In 1996, he appeared at the Academy Awards to a long standing ovation and gave a speech about Hollywood’s duty to make movies that face the world’s most important issues head-on.

He also hosted the Paralympics in Atlanta and spoke at the Democratic National Convention. He traveled across the country to make speeches, he narrated the HBO film Without Pity: A Film About Abilities. The film won the Emmy Award for “Outstanding Informational Special.” He then acted in a small role in the film A Step Towards Tomorrow.Reeve was elected Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability. He co-founded the Reeve-Irvine Research Center, which is now one of the leading spinal cord research centers in the world. He created the the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation to speed up research through funding, and to use grants to improve the quality of the lives of people with disabilities. Reeve used his celebrity status for good causes.He lobbied on behalf of people with spinal-cord injuries and for human embryonic stem cell research, founding the Christopher Reeve Foundation and co-founding the Reeve-Irvine Research Center. Through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, he visited terminally ill children. He joined the Board of Directors for the worldwide charity Save the Children. and has done more to promote research on spinal cord injury and other neurological disorders than any other person before or since.

In 1997, Reeve made his directorial debut with the HBO film In the Gloaming with Robert Sean Leonard, Glenn Close, Whoopi Goldberg, Bridget Fonda and David Strathairn. The film won four Cable Ace Awards and was nominated for five Emmy Awards including “Outstanding Director for a Miniseries or Special. In 1998, Reeve produced and starred in Rear Window, a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 film. He was nominated for a Golden Globe and won a Screen Actors Guild Award for his performance. On April 25, 1998, Random House published Reeve’s autobiography, Still Me. The book spent eleven weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list and Reeve won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album. In 2000, he also began to regain some motor function, and was able to sense hot and cold temperatures on his body, and was also able to move his left index finger on command, Reeve also lobbied for expanded federal funding on embryonic stem cell research. In 2002, the Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center, a federal government facility created through a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention non-compete grant, was opened in Short Hills, New Jersey. Its mission is to teach paralyzed people to live more independently. In 2004, Reeve directed the A&E film The Brooke Ellison Story. The film is based on the true story of Brooke Ellison, the first quadriplegic to graduate from Harvard University Reeve’s second book, Nothing is Impossible was also published, Reeve also directed the animated film Everyone’s Hero.

Sadly His recovery was plagued by illness, He fell ill with mononucleosis, malaria, and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. He also suffered from mastocytosis, a blood cell disorder and fought off a number of serious infections believed to have originated from bone marrow. He also had asthma and many allergies and More than once he had a severe reaction to a drug. In Kessler, he tried a drug named Sygen which helps reduce damage to the spinal cord. The drug caused him to go into anaphylactic shock and his heart stopped, He fell into a coma and was taken to Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, New York. Eighteen hours later, on October 10, 2004, Reeve died of cardiac arrest at the age of 52. His doctor, John McDonald, believed that it was an adverse reaction to the antibiotic that caused his death. During the final days of his life, Reeve also urged California voters to vote yes on Proposition 71, which would establish the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, & allot $3 billion of state funds to stem cell research. A memorial service for Reeve was held at the Unitarian Church in Westport, Connecticut, which his wife attended. Reeve was cremated & his ashes scattered. Proposition 71 was also approved less than one month after Reeve’s death.