Frederick Hawksworth CME

BR 2-6-0 1501pt

The last Great Western Railway Chief Mechanical Engineer Frederick William Hawksworth sadly died 13 July 1976. He was born 10 February 1884 in Swindon, and he joined the GWR in 1898, aged 15 where he worked Under George Churchward and C.B.  Collett before becoming Chief Mechanical Engineer of the Great Western Railway when he was 57, in 1941. Having been at the forefront of steam locomotive development under George Jackson Churchward, ideas at Swindon Works had somewhat stagnated under the later years of his successor C. B. Collett, whose reluctance to give up the CME’s post resulted in Hawksworth’s lateness in taking up this position. Hawksworth had been one of Churchward’s “Bright Young Men”, and was involved in Churchward’s designs: he worked on, for example, the general arrangement drawings for “The Great Bear”.

Hawksworth continued in the design tradition which he had been involved in throughout his career, but made some important improvements. In particular increased superheat started to be fitted to the larger classes under his regime, and the works started to make much more use of welded construction. Another prominent new concept was a tender with slab sides, using welded construction, giving a much smoother appearance than the traditional design with stepped sides and riveted plates. His first design to be built, from 1944, was the Modified Hall, a significant development of the Collett design with increased superheat and very different cylinder and frame construction.After the war there were four more new designs, mostly improvements of earlier types. The ‘County’ Class 4-6-0 was the last and most powerful GWR 2-cylinder 4-6-0, the culmination of a line that began with the ‘Saints’ 42 years before. The chassis was similar to the modified Hall, but the boilers were to a new design, larger in diameter than the Std 1 (Hall) boiler but smaller in diameter and appreciably shorter than the Castle boiler. This boiler used tooling which was available from LMS 8F 2-8-0 boilers which Swindon had built for the Railway Executive during World War II and was pressed to 280psi, higher pressure than any previous GWR boiler.

They used some of the names from the vanished Churchward County Class 4-4-0s. He also designed The taper boilered 9400 Class 0-6-0 pannier tank, which were similar to the 5700 class under the footplate but had a much larger boiler giving them more power and adhesive weight – and thus braking capacity. Only the first ten, built by the Swindon, appeared under the GWR. The last two designs were only seen in British Railways livery. Arguably his most radical design was the 1500 Class. This had the same boiler as the 9400 but an all new short wheelbase chassis with outside Walschaerts valve gear and no running plate, and made considerable use of welded construction, the only remaining 15xx class left, no.1501, can currently be seen on the Severn Valley Railway. They were designed for easy maintenance by the trackside. The last Hawksworth design was a very light conventional 0-6-0 pannier tank, the 1600 Class. This was a modernisation of the 2021 Class.

Hawksworth remained Chief Mechanical Engineer through the formation of the Western Region of British Railways in 1948, continuing to work on locomotive design until retiring at the end of 1949. He died in Swindon 27 years later in July 1976. His ashes are buried in St. Mark’s Church, adjacent to the former site of Swindon Works.

Sir William Stanier

Stanier Black Five 45110

Railway engineer Sir William Stanier was Born 27th May 1876 in Swindon. His father worked for the Great Western Railway (GWR) as William Dean’s Chief Clerk, and educated at Swindon High School and also, for a single year, at Wycliffe College. In 1891 he followed his father into a career with the GWR, initially as an office boy and then for five years as an apprentice in the workshops. Between 1897 and 1900 he worked in the Drawing Office as a draughtsman, before becoming Inspector of Materials in 1900. In 1904, George Jackson Churchward appointed him as Assistant to the Divisional Locomotive Superintendent in London. In 1912 he returned to Swindon to become the Assistant Works Manager and in 1920 was promoted to the post of Works Manager.In late 1931, he was “headhunted” by Sir Josiah Stamp, chairman of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) to become the Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of that railway from 1 January 1932. He was charged with introducing modern and more powerful locomotive designs, using his knowledge gained at Swindon with the GWR. Stanier built many other very successful designs for the LMS, especially the “Black 5″ mixed traffic 4-6-0, and the 8F 2-8-0 freight locomotives.

His Coronation Scot set a new British record of 114 mph, beating the previous record set by a Gresley A4, but this was eclipsed by another Gresley A4 “Mallard”, which set a new record of 126 mph for Steam Engines which still stands to this day During WWII he worked as a consultant for the Ministry of Supply and retired in 1944. He was knighted on 9 February 1943 and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on his retirement, the only railway engineer other than George Stephenson to receive that honour. He was also president of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers for 1944. William Stanier, with the backing of Sir Josiah Stamp, Chairman of the Company, reversed the small engine policy, which the LMS had inherited from the Midland Railway, with beneficial results. William Stanier, sadly passed away 27 September 1965. Happily many of Stanier’s locomotives can still be seen working on Heritage lines throughout the United Kingdom. Including LMS 6201 Princess Elizabeth, the Stanier “Black Five” 45110 (which was used for the Fifteen Guineas Special in 1968) and the Stanier Mogul No. 42968. Among Stanier’s Best designs are:

LMS Class 2P 0-4-4T (designed in the Midland Railway design office),
LMS Class 3MT 2-6-2T,
LMS Class 4MT 2-6-4T (3-cyl),
LMS Class 4MT 2-6-4T (2-cyl),
LMS Class 5MT 2-6-0 ”Mogul”,
LMS Class 5MT “Black Five” 4-6-0,
LMS Class 6P “Jubilee” 4-6-0,
LMS Class 8P “Princess Royal” 4-6-2,
LMS Class 8P “Princess Coronation” 4-6-2,
LMS Class 8F 2-8-0, LMS Turbomotive

Severn Valley Railway Spring Diesel Gala

The Severn Valley Railway Spring Diesel Gala takes place between 18 May and 20 May. The event, and theme, will mark the 30th anniversary of the first Severn Valley Railway Diesel Gala. Additionally, the festival will celebrate two other milestones: the 40th anniversary of the last Class 52 runs on British Railways, and the 25th anniversary of the first Class 50 runs on the SVR.The Severn Valley Railway held its first diesel gala in May 1987. Over the years an impressive and diverse array of visiting diesel locomotives have appeared at the SVR including class 14, class 88, class 50, class 52, class 55, class 45, class 37, class 47, class 20 and class 33. To mark 30 years of Diesel Galas on the Severn Valley Railway, a 100 minute DVD featuring 90 different locos in action is being released to coincide with this years Spring Diesel Gala.

Visiting Locomotives appearing at the event will include Class 14 No. D9551 diesel-hydraulic locomotive. These received the nickname “Teddy Bear” following a comment by Swindon Works’ foreman George Cole who quipped “We’ve built the Great Bear, now we’re going to build a Teddy Bear!”. heritage diesel locomotives Class 20s No. 20189 & No. 20205 With thanks to Michael Owen. Class 31 No. 31271 courtesy A1A Locomotives Ltd. Class 33 No. 33035 courtesy of The Pioneer Diesel Group. Class 33 No. 33108 courtesy of Class 33/1 Preservation Company. Class 45 No. 45041 Royal Tank Regiment courtesy of Peak Locomotive Co Ltd. Class 45 No. 45060 Sherwood Forester courtesy of The Pioneer Diesel Group. Class 47 No. 47192 courtesy of Crewe Heritage Trust. Class 47 No. 47828 Courtesy of D05 Preservation Ltd & Dartmoor Railway. Class 50 No. 50008 Thunderer courtesy of Garcia Hanson. Class 55 No. 55022 Royal Scots Grey Courtesy of Martin Walker. Class 60 No. 60xxx courtesy ofDB Cargo UK. Class 66 No. 667xx, Class 73 No. 73107 and Class 73 No. 73965 courtesy of GBRf and Class 88 Diesel Electric Locomotive No. 88xxx courtesy of DRS which will be making the first ever public passenger runs.

The visiting locomotives will be supported by the home fleet, including: No. D2961, No. D3586, No. D4100 or No. 12099, Class 14 No. D9551, Class 50s No. 50031 Hood, No. 50035 Ark Royal and No. 50049 Defiance, Class 52s No. D1015 Western Champion and No. D1062 Western Courier. and There is also a Mixed traction day on 21 May.

Severn Valley Railway Spring Steam Gala

The Severn Valley Railway Spring Diesel Gala takes place between 18 May and 20 May. The event, and theme, will mark the 30th anniversary of the first Severn Valley Railway Diesel Gala. Additionally, the festival will celebrate two other milestones: the 40th anniversary of the last Class 52 runs on British Railways, and the 25th anniversary of the first Class 50 runs on the SVR.

The Severn Valley Railway held its first diesel gala in May 1987. Over the years an impressive and diverse array of visiting diesel locomotives have appeared at the SVR including class 14, class 88, class 50, class 52, class 55, class 45, class 37, class 47, class 20 and class 33. To mark 30 years of Diesel Galas on the Severn Valley Railway, a 100 minute DVD featuring 90 different locos in action is being released to coincide with this years Spring Diesel Gala. Here is a gallery of previous visitors.

Visiting Locomotives appearing at the event will include Class 14 No. D9551 diesel-hydraulic locomotive. These received the nickname “Teddy Bear” following a comment by Swindon Works’ foreman George Cole who quipped “We’ve built the Great Bear, now we’re going to build a Teddy Bear!”. heritage diesel locomotives Class 20s No. 20189 & No. 20205 With thanks to Michael Owen. Class 31 No. 31271 courtesy A1A Locomotives Ltd. Class 33 No. 33035 courtesy of The Pioneer Diesel Group. Class 33 No. 33108 courtesy of Class 33/1 Preservation Company. Class 45 No. 45041 Royal Tank Regiment courtesy of Peak Locomotive Co Ltd. Class 45 No. 45060 Sherwood Forester courtesy of The Pioneer Diesel Group. Class 47 No. 47192 courtesy of Crewe Heritage Trust. Class 47 No. 47828 Courtesy of D05 Preservation Ltd & Dartmoor Railway. Class 50 No. 50008 Thunderer courtesy of Garcia Hanson. Class 55 No. 55022 Royal Scots Grey Courtesy of Martin Walker. Class 60 No. 60xxx courtesy ofDB Cargo UK. Class 66 No. 667xx, Class 73 No. 73107 and Class 73 No. 73965 courtesy of GBRf and Class 88 Diesel Electric Locomotive No. 88xxx courtesy of DRS which will be making the first ever public passenger runs.

The visiting locomotives will be supported by the home fleet, including: No. D2961, No. D3586, No. D4100 or No. 12099, Class 14 No. D9551, Class 50s No. 50031 Hood, No. 50035 Ark Royal and No. 50049 Defiance, Class 52s No. D1015 Western Champion and No. D1062 Western Courier. and There is also a Mixed traction day on 21 May.

Steam spotlight-Severn Valley Railway 2016

I have also recently watched this DVD which features footage taken on the Severn Valley Railway and Elsewhere taken during 2016. First up It Features the Spring Steam Gala which took place March 2016. Engines in steam were West Country Class Pacific 34027 Taw Valley, Battle of Britain class Pacific 34053 Sir Keith Park, GWR 1501, Ivatt class 4 43106, GWR Prairie tank engine 4566, GWR Manor class locomotive 7812 Erlestoke Manor, GWR 28xx class 2-8-0 2857 and GWR 1450 on the Auto train. The Visiting engines for the event were Pannier Tanks 6412 &6430 plus GWR Hall class locomotive no.6990 Witherslack Hall.

The DVD also features 1450 on the Auto Train with the Eardington Flyer, 34053 Sir Keith Park on tour at the West Somerset Spring Gala masquerading as 34098 Templecombe. 4566 on the tour at the North Norfolk Railway, 34053 Sir Keith Park at the Keighley and Worth Valley Autumn Gala. GWR Prairie tank 4566 at the Great Central Railway. 43106 at the North Norfolk Railway Autumn Steam Gala. 34053 Sir Keith Park at the Great Central Railway Winter Steam Gala. Ivatt Class 4 43106 at the Mid Hants Autumn Steam Gala and 7812 Erlestoke Manor at the Gloucester,Warwicksire Cotswold Festival of Steam.

Also featured are The Santa specials between Kidderminster and Arley, featuring 34027 Taw Valley, 34053 Sir Keith Park, Ivatt Class 4 43106 and GWR Manor class 7802 Bradley Manor and 7812 Erlestoke Manor. As is the End of Season Gala featuring Hughes Crab locomotive 13065, LNER A1 Pacific 60163 Tornado and GWR large prairie locomotive 4270

Also featured is the Severn Valley Railway Pacific Power event which featured the iconic LNER A3 Pacific 60103 Flying Scotsman, LNER A1 Pacific 60163 Tornado, SR Battle of Britain class pacific 34053 Sir Keith Park and SR West Country class Pacific 34027 Taw Valley

Fred Dibnah MBE

Charismatic Engineer, Steeplejack and British television personality Fred Dibnah was Born 28th April 1938. As a child, Dibnah was fascinated by the steam engines which powered the many textile mills in his home town of Bolton and developed a keen interest in mechanical engineering, Steam Engines and chimneys and the men who worked on them. He began his working life as a joiner, before becoming a steeplejack. From age 22, he served for two years in the armed forces, as part of his national service. Once demobilised, he returned to steeplejacking but met with limited success until he was asked to repair Bolton’s parish church. The resulting publicity provided a welcome boost to his business, ensuring he was almost never out of work.

Dibnah’s interest in steam power stemmed from his childhood observations of the steam locomotives on the nearby railway line, and his visits to his father’s workplace—a bleach works in Bolton—where he was fascinated by the steam engines used to drive the line shafting. He later became a steam enthusiast, befriending many of the engine drivers and firemen who worked on the nearby railway. As a teenager he met a driver who invited him onto the footplate of his locomotive and who asked him to keep the boiler supplied with fuel. Dibnah became so enamoured with steam engines that he eventually looked for one he could buy. He learnt of a steamroller kept in a barn near Warrington and which the owners had bought from Flintshire County Council. He had the boiler pressure-tested and, despite it being in poor condition, bought it for £175. He towed it to a friend’s house, spent a fortnight making various repairs and drove it to his mother’s house in Bolton.

After he married and bought his own property on Radcliffe new Road, he cut an access road to the garden of his new house and moved the steamroller there. Restoring the engine took many years, as Dibnah had to create his own replacement parts, using Victorian engineering techniques and equipment he built in his garden. The boiler was in poor condition and needed serious work, but Dibnah used local knowledge and was eventually able to build a new boiler. Once restored, he used the 1910 Aveling & Porter steamroller together with a living van he bought and restored, to take his family around the local steam fairs In 1978, while making repairs to Bolton Town Hall, Dibnah was filmed by a regional BBC news crew. The BBC then commissioned an award-winning documentary, which followed the rough-hewn steeplejack as he worked on chimneys, interacted with his family and talked about his favourite hobby—steam.

He made many more Television programmes about Steam Engines & Locomotives and In 1998, he presented a programme on Britain’s industrial history and went on to present a number of fascinating series, largely concerned with the Industrial Revolution and its mechanical and architectural legacy. In mid-2000, Dibnah was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Technology for his achievement in engineering by Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, and on 19 July 2004 he was made an honorary Doctor of the University by the University of Birmingham. He was also awarded an MBE for services to heritage and broadcasting. He said “I’m looking forward to meeting the Queen but I shall probably have to get a new cap. And I’d like to meet Prince Charles because we share the same views about modern architecture.”On 7 July 2004, Dibnah went to Buckingham Palace to receive his award from the Queen.

Sadly Fred’s health was failing at this point although filming continued at various locations around the country, with sons Jack and Roger, who had become essential members of the tour, providing much-needed support for their father. By the end of July, the crew had filmed only 34 days with Dibnah, out of a planned 60. It was becoming more difficult by the day for Dibnah to fulfil his filming duties and the crew decided to cut short the schedule and he died shortly after on 7 November 2004 and is sadly missed. He is survived by his five children from three marriages.

Richard Trevithick

Catch me Who Can

Best known for creating earlt Steam Engines, Cornish Inventor and Mining Engineer Richard Trevithick Sadly died on April 22 1833 at the Bull Hotel, Dartford After spending a week in bed with pneumonia. Born13 April 1771 in Tregajorran, Cornwall. Trevithick was an engineer at a mine in 1797 who with the help of Edward Bell pioneered the use of A high pressure steam engine. His first success was On 21 February 1804 when the world’s first locomotive-hauled railway journey took place when Trevithick’s unnamed steam locomotive hauled a train along the tramway of the Pen-y-darren Ironworks, near Merthyr Tydfil in Wales. However he ran afoul of Matthew Boulton & James Watt, who held a number of Patents for steam engines. He improved boiler technology allowing the safe production of high pressure steam, able to move pistons in steam engines instead of using atmospheric pressure.

William Murdoch, who lived next door to Trevithick, demonstrated a model steam carriage to Trevithick in 1794. Both Oliver Evans in the U.S. and Arthur Woolf were also experimenting on a similar engine. However Trevithick actually made high pressure steam work, eliminating the need for a condenser, and allowing the use of a smaller cylinder, Making the engine more compact, lighter and small enough to carry its own weight with a carriage attached. Trevithick built his first stationary models of high pressure steam engines, then attached one to a road carriage. Exhaust steam was vented via a vertical chimney, thus avoiding a condenser and any possible infringements of Watt’s patent, with linear motion being converted into circular motion via a crank instead of a beam.

Coalbrookdale Engine

Trevithick built a full-size steam road locomotive in 1801 in Camborne. He named the carriage ‘Puffing Devil’ and, on Christmas Eve it successfully carried seven men from Fore Street up Camborne Hill, past Camborne Cross, to the nearby village of Beacon with his cousin and associate, Andrew Vivian, steering. This is inspired the popular Cornish folk song “Camborne Hill”. However, a steam wagon built in 1770 by Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot may have an earlier claim. During further tests, Trevithick’s locomotive was prone to break down and on one occasion the Boiler was allowed to run dry and the machine exploded. Trevithick did not consider this a serious setback, but rather operator error. In 1802 Trevithick took out a patent for his high pressure steam engine. To prove his ideas, he built a stationary engine at the Coalbrookdale Company’s works in Shropshire in 1802. The Coalbrookdale company then built a rail locomotive for him, but little is known about it, including whether or not it actually ran. To date, the only known information about it comes from a drawing preserved at the Science Museum, London, together with a letter written by Trevithick to his friend, Davies Giddy. The design incorporated a single horizontal cylinder enclosed in a return-flue boiler. A flywheel drove the wheels on one side through spur gears, and the axles were mounted directly on the boiler, with no frame. Unfortunately The Puffing Devil could not maintain sufficient steam pressure and would have been of little practical use. In 1803 he built another steam-powered road vehicle called the London Steam Carriage, which attracted much attention from the public and press when he drove it that year in London from Holborn to Paddington and back. It was uncomfortable for passengers and proved more expensive to run than a horse-drawn carriage and so the project was abandoned.

Pen-y-Darren

In 1802 Trevithick built one of his high pressure steam engines to drive a hammer at the Pen-y-Darren Ironworks in Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales. With the assistance of Rees Jones, an employee of the iron works and under the supervision of Samuel Homfray, the proprietor, he mounted the engine on wheels and turned it into a locomotive. In 1803 Trevithick sold the patents for his locomotives to Samuel Homfray. Homfrey was so impressed with Trevithick’s locomotive that he made a bet with another ironmaster, Richard Crawshay, for 500 guineas that Trevithick’s steam locomotive could haul 10 tons of iron along the Merthyr Tydfil Tramroad from Penydarren to Abercynon , a distance of 9.75 miles (16 km). Amid great interest from the public, on 21 February 1804 it carried 10 tons of iron, 5 wagons and 70 men the distance in 4 hours and 5 minutes, an average speed of approximately 2.4 mph (3.9 km/h). As well as Homfray, Crawshay and the passengers, other witnesses included Mr. Giddy, a respected patron of Trevithick and an ‘engineer from the Government’. The locomotive was relatively primitive comprising of a boiler with a single return flue mounted on a four wheel frame. At one end, a single cylinder with very long stroke was mounted partly in the boiler, and a piston rod crosshead ran out along a slidebar, an arrangement that looked like a giant trombone. As there was only one cylinder, this was coupled to a large flywheel mounted on one side. The rotational inertia of the flywheel would even out the movement that was transmitted to a central cog-wheel that was, in turn connected to the driving wheels. It used a high pressure cylinder without a condenser, the exhaust steam was sent up the chimney assisting the draught through the fire, increasing efficiency even more.

The proprietor of the Wylam colliery near Newcastle, heard of the success in Wales and wrote to Trevithick asking for locomotive designs. These were sent to John Whitfield at Gateshead, Trevithick’s agent, who built what was probably the first locomotive to have flanged wheels. Unfortunately Trevithick’s machine was too heavy for the wooden track. Then In 1808 Trevithick publicised his steam railway locomotive expertise by building a new locomotive called ‘Catch me who can’, built for him by John Hazledine and John Urpeth Rastrick at Bridgnorth in Shropshire, This was similar to that used at Penydarren and named by Mr. Giddy’s daughter. This was Trevithick’s third railway locomotive after those used at Pen-y-darren ironworks and the Wylam colliery. He ran it on a circular track just south of the present day Euston Square tube station in London, Admission to the “steam circus” was one shilling including a ride and it was intended to show that rail travel was faster than by horse. So Recently a group of dedicated people down at the Severn Valley Railway decided to build a replica of Catch-Me-Who-Can.

In 1805 Cornish Engineer Robert Vazie, excavated a tunnel under the River Thames at Rotherhithe and had serious problems with flooding getting no further than sinking the end shafts. So Trevithick was consulted and paid £1000 (the equivalent of £67,387 as of 2014 to complete the tunnel, a length of 1220 feet (366 m). In August 1807 Trevithick began driving a small pilot tunnel and By 23 December after it had progressed 950 feet (285 m) progress was delayed after The tunnel was flooded twice and Trevithick, was nearly drowned. Progress stalled and the project was never actually completed until 1843 when Sir Marc and Isambard Kingdom Brunel built a tunnel under the Thames. Trevithick’s used a submerged tube to cross the Detroit River in Michigan with the construction of the Michigan Central Railway Tunnel, under the engineering supervision of The New York Central Railway’s engineering vice president, William J Wilgus. Construction began in 1903 and was completed in 1910. The Detroit–Windsor Tunnel which was completed in 1930 for automotive traffic, and the tunnel under the Hong Kong harbour were also submerged tube designs. Trevithick’s high-pressure steam engines had many applications including cannon manufacture, stone crushing, rolling mills, forge hammers, blast furnace blowers and traditional mining. He also built a barge powered by paddle wheels and several dredgers.

In 1808, Trevithick entered a partnership with West Indian Merchant Robert Dickinson, who had supported Trevithick’s patents. Including the ‘Nautical Labourer’; a steam tug with a floating crane propelled by paddle wheels. He also patented Iron tanks in ships for storage of cargo and water instead of in wooden caskS, these were also used to raise sunken wrecks by placing them under the wreck and creating buoyancy by pumping them full of air. In 1810 a wreck near Margate was raised in this way. Trevithick worked on many other ideas on improvements for ships: iron floating docks, iron ships, telescopic iron masts, improved ship structures, iron buoys and using heat from the ships boilers for cooking. In May 1810, he caught typhoid and nearly died and in February 1811 he and Dickinson were declared bankrupt. Around 1812, Trevithick designed the ‘Cornish boiler’. These were horizontal, cylindrical boilers with a single internal fire tube or flue passing horizontally through the middle. Hot exhaust gases from the fire passed through the flue thus increasing the surface area heating the water and improving efficiency. These types were installed in the Boulton and Watt pumping engines at Dolcoath and more than doubled their efficiency.

Again in 1812, he installed a new ‘high-pressure’ experimental steam engine also with condensing at Wheal Prosper. This became known as the ‘Cornish engine’ and was the most efficient in the world at that time. Other Cornish engineers contributed to its development but Trevithick’s work was predominant. In the same year he installed another high-pressure engine, though non-condensing, in a threshing machine on a farm at Probus, Cornwall. It was very successful and proved to be cheaper to run than the horses it replaced. It ran for 70 years and is exhibited at the Science Museum. Trevithick attempted to build a ‘recoil engine’ similar to the aeolipile described by Hero of Alexandria in about AD 50, this comprised a boiler feeding a hollow axle to route the steam to a catherine wheel with two fine-bore steam jets on its circumference. The first wheel was 15 feet (4.6 m) in diameter and a later attempt was 24 feet (7.3 m) in diameter. To get any usable torque, steam had to issue from the nozzles at a very high velocity and in such large volume that it proved not to operate with adequate efficiency. Today this would be recognised as a reaction turbine.

A miner, named Francisco Uville bought one of Trevithick’s Hight Pressure Steam Engine for draining water from his silver mine at Cerro de Pasco, Peru. In 1813 Uville journeyed to England aboard the Falmouth packet ship ‘Fox’ coincidentally with one of Trevithick’s cousins on board the same vessel. On 20 October 1816 Trevithick left Penzance on the whaler ship Asp accompanied by a lawyer named Page and a boilermaker bound for Peru where he was consulted on mining methods. The government granted him certain mining rights and he found mining areas, but did not have the funds to develop them, with the exception of a copper and silver mine at Caxatambo. After serving in the army of Simon Bolivar he returned to Caxatambo but was forced to leave the area and abandon £5000 worth of ore ready to ship. Uville died in 1818 and Trevithick soon returned to Cerro de Pasco And After leaving Cerro de Pasco, Trevithick passed through Ecuador on his way to Bogotá in Colombia. He arrived in Costa Rica in 1822 to build mining machinery.

However transporting ore and equipment, using the San Juan River, the Sarapiqui River, and the railway proved treacherous And Trevithick was nearly killed twice. He met Robert Stephenson in Cartagena And he gave Trevithick £50 to help his passage home. He arrived at Falmouth in October 1827. In 1829 he built a closed cycle steam engine followed by a vertical tubular boiler. In1830 he invented an early form of storage room heater, comptising of a small fire tube boiler with a detachable flue which could be heated either outside or indoors with the flue connected to a chimney. He was also invited to work on an engine of a new vessel at Dartford, Which involved a reaction turbine.

Following his death Trevithick was buried in an unmarked grave in St Edmunds Burial Ground, East Hill, Dartford. The burial ground closed in 1857, with the gravestones being removed in the 1960s. A plaque marks the approximate spot believed to be the site of the grave. The plaque lies on the side of the park, near the East Hill gate.