Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Glala 2018

The Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala takes place from September 20th – 23rd 2018. Visiting locomotives to this event include LMS 4-6-0 Royal Scot class Locomotive No. 46100 Royal Scot. The Royal Scot was Built in 1927, And was the flagship locomotive of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company, operating the fastest services on the West Coast from London to Manchester and Glasgow. Later in its life, No. 46100 was chosen to appear on behalf of Britain at the 1933 ‘Century of Progress’ exhibition in Chicago, USA. The locomotive, as well as a full rake of carriages, were shipped to the United States and appeared not only at the exhibition, but also toured the USA and Canada, even crossing the Rocky Mountains. It made its debut at the Severn Valley Railway following overhaul in 2015 and is making a welcome return to the Severn Valley Railway in 2018 for the Autumn Steam Gala

LMS 46100 Royal Scot

The second visitor to the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala, is LMS Princess Coronation Class 4-6-2 “Pacific” No.46233 ‘Duchess of Sutherland’ . This was built in 1938 by Crewe Works for the London Midland and Scottish Railway. Built as a high speed express passenger locomotive, 46233 was built to haul fast express passenger services such as ‘The Royal Scot’ and ‘The Mid-Day Scot’ between London Euston and Glasgow Central as well as other expresses to Liverpool.

6233 was outshopped in July 1938 from Crewe Works and was part of the third batch of her class. These were unstreamlined, painted in LMS standard crimson lake livery and had a single chimney and no smoke deflectors and an estimated cost of £13,800 each. 6233 was initially allocated to Camden, London. It acquired a double chimney in March 1941 and because of drifting smoke acquired smoke deflectors in September 1945 before being painted in postwar LMS black livery in September 1946. With the creation of British Railways on 1 January 1948 it was allocated to Crewe North depot. BR renumbered the locomotive to 46233 in October 1948 and repainted it in BR Brunswick green livery in 1952 or early 1953. In June 1958 it was allocated to Carlisle Upperby before eventually being withdrawn from Edge Hill depot in February 1964. During its 25 years service Duchess of Sutherland ran 1,650,000 miles – the second highest mileage by any member of the class.

It was Withdrawn by British Railways in 1964, the locomotive was originally sold to Butlins holiday camp in Scotland. In 1996, the locomotive was acquired by The Princess Royal Class Locomotive Trust with the intention of restoration to mainline condition . By 2001, 46233 had been restored to operating condition and since then has been a regular performer on the national network. On 6 March 2010, 6233 was rolled out in LMS lined black livery, which was retained during 2010, before a major overhaul, taking 6233 out of service for the 2011 season. On 3 March 2012, now renumbered 46233 it was rolled out in “authentic (Brunswick) green” livery, as used by British Railways during the early 1950s, at the Midland Railway – Butterley following a major overhaul. Since then it has been again be repainted in LMS Crimson Lake and renumbered LMS 6233.

Princess Coronation class 2-6-4 Pacific 6233 “Duchess of Sutherland”

The third visiting locomotive for the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala is British Rail Standard class 7 4-6-2 Pacific No. 70000 Britannia. Britannia was built at Crewe, completed on 2 January 1951. She was the first British Railways standard locomotive to be built and the first of 55 locomotives of the Britannia class. The locomotive was named at a ceremony at Marylebone Station by the then Minister for Transport Alfred Barnes on 30 January 1951.

The BR Locomotive Naming Committee were determined not to use names already in use on other locomotives. They tried to observe this by not selecting the name Britannia for use on 70000 because it was already in use on one of the ex-LMS Jubilee Class locomotives, however Robert Riddles overruled them and the Jubilee had to be renamed. Britannia was initially based at Stratford (30A) in order to work East Anglian expresses to Norwich and Great Yarmouth, but was also particularly associated with the Hook Continental boat train to Harwich. Subsequently, the loco was based at Norwich Thorpe (w/e 31 January 1959) and March (June 1961) before spending the remainder of her career on the London Midland Region: Willesden (1A) (w/e 30 March 1963), Crewe North (5A) (w/e 25 May 1963), Crewe South (5B) (w/e 19 May 1965) and finally Newton Heath (9D) (w/e 5 March 1966) from where she was withdrawn w/e 28 May 1966. The locomotive pulled the funeral train of King George VI from King’s Lynn, Norfolk to London following his death in February 1952 at Sandringham House, Norfolk and Britannia had her cab roof painted white, as was the custom with royal locomotives. Britannia has also worn the white roof in preservation. Britannia was withdrawn in May 1966, after 15 years of service.

Initially destined for the National Railway Museum because of her cultural significance, she was stored. However, due to her prototype design and construction differences, the NRM chose standard sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell, instead. Britannia was eventually bought by Britannia Locomotive Company Ltd. She was eventually returned to steam on the Severn Valley Railway, where she remained between 1971 and 1980, in operational but non-mainline condition. With the society wishing to make more use of the locomotive, she was moved to the European gauge Nene Valley Railway in Peterborough, where she was also fitted with an air-brake compressor, and was based there from 1980-2000. Britannia made her return to the main line on 27 July 1991, successfully working enthusiast trips until 1997, and was featured in an episode of London’s Burning.

Due to the high cost of refurbishment, the locomotive was sold to Pete Waterman in 2000 with an expired mainline boiler certificate. She was Stored at Waterman’s workshops at the Crewe Heritage Centre, However the amount of work resulted in Waterman selling her to Jeremy Hosking. The locomotive underwent restoration at Crewe which involved a newly refurbished cab, a new smoke box and major work on the boiler; replacement steel sides, new crown stays, new front section barrel section, new steel and copper tubeplate, repairs and patches to door plate and major work to copper firebox.

BR standard class 2-6-4 70000 Britannia

In 2011 Britannia was Transferred to the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust (RSL&GT), and returned to main line operational condition in its prototype black British Railways livery (where it did not have nameplates fitted, as was thus known by railway convention as 70000). After a running-in period, in 2012 the locomotive was repainted in British Railways Brunswick Green, but with an early BR crest (unlike her sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell which carries BR’s Late Crest). On 24 January 2012, the loco hauled the Royal Train with Prince Charles on board to Wakefield Kirkgate, where he rededicated the locomotive. For the trip the loco again had a painted white cab roof, removed after the engine’s appearance at the West Somerset Railway’s Spring Gala. After extensive work to the locomotive over three years, the team of engineers at LNWR(H) completed the rebuilding of the locomotive and successfully returned her to steam at their Crewe Diesel Depot.

The final vistor for the 2018 Severn Valley Railway autumn Steam Gala is Ex LNER Q6 Class/NER T2 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive no. 3395, Ex BR 63395. It was originally theThe North Eastern Railway Class T2, but was reclassified as Class Q6 by the LNER. It is one of One-hundred-and-twenty which were originally built at Darlington Works and Armstrong Whitworth between 1913 and 1921 to the design of Vincent Raven, based on the NER Class T and T1 (LNER Q5). LNER Q6 3395 was built in 1918 And is normally on the North York Moors Railway. In addition the severn valley Railway is marking the centenary of GWR 28xx 2-8-0 Freight Locomotive no. 2857 Which was built 100 years ago in 1918. Thankfully the weather on Friday was also much better than Thursday.

GWR 2-8-0 no. 2857

Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala

The Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala takes place from September 20th – 23rd 2018. Visiting locomotives to this event include LMS 4-6-0 Royal Scot class Locomotive No. 46100 Royal Scot. The Royal Scot was Built in 1927, And was the flagship locomotive of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company, operating the fastest services on the West Coast from London to Manchester and Glasgow. Later in its life, No. 46100 was chosen to appear on behalf of Britain at the 1933 ‘Century of Progress’ exhibition in Chicago, USA. The locomotive, as well as a full rake of carriages, were shipped to the United States and appeared not only at the exhibition, but also toured the USA and Canada, even crossing the Rocky Mountains. It made its debut at the Severn Valley Railway following overhaul in 2015 and is making a welcome return to the Severn Valley Railway in 2018 for the Autumn Steam Gala

LMS 46100 Royal Scot

The second visitor to the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala, is LMS Princess Coronation Class 4-6-2 “Pacific” No.46233 ‘Duchess of Sutherland’ . This was built in 1938 by Crewe Works for the London Midland and Scottish Railway. Built as a high speed express passenger locomotive, 46233 was built to haul fast express passenger services such as ‘The Royal Scot’ and ‘The Mid-Day Scot’ between London Euston and Glasgow Central as well as other expresses to Liverpool.

6233 was outshopped in July 1938 from Crewe Works and was part of the third batch of her class. These were unstreamlined, painted in LMS standard crimson lake livery and had a single chimney and no smoke deflectors and an estimated cost of £13,800 each. 6233 was initially allocated to Camden, London. It acquired a double chimney in March 1941 and because of drifting smoke acquired smoke deflectors in September 1945 before being painted in postwar LMS black livery in September 1946. With the creation of British Railways on 1 January 1948 it was allocated to Crewe North depot. BR renumbered the locomotive to 46233 in October 1948 and repainted it in BR Brunswick green livery in 1952 or early 1953. In June 1958 it was allocated to Carlisle Upperby before eventually being withdrawn from Edge Hill depot in February 1964. During its 25 years service Duchess of Sutherland ran 1,650,000 miles – the second highest mileage by any member of the class.

It was Withdrawn by British Railways in 1964, the locomotive was originally sold to Butlins holiday camp in Scotland. In 1996, the locomotive was acquired by The Princess Royal Class Locomotive Trust with the intention of restoration to mainline condition . By 2001, 46233 had been restored to operating condition and since then has been a regular performer on the national network. On 6 March 2010, 6233 was rolled out in LMS lined black livery, which was retained during 2010, before a major overhaul, taking 6233 out of service for the 2011 season. On 3 March 2012, now renumbered 46233 it was rolled out in “authentic (Brunswick) green” livery, as used by British Railways during the early 1950s, at the Midland Railway – Butterley following a major overhaul. Since then it has been again be repainted in LMS Crimson Lake and renumbered LMS 6233.

BR standard class 2-6-4 70000 Britannia

The third visiting locomotive for the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala is British Rail Standard class 7 4-6-2 Pacific No. 70000 Britannia. Britannia was built at Crewe, completed on 2 January 1951. She was the first British Railways standard locomotive to be built and the first of 55 locomotives of the Britannia class. The locomotive was named at a ceremony at Marylebone Station by the then Minister for Transport Alfred Barnes on 30 January 1951.

The BR Locomotive Naming Committee were determined not to use names already in use on other locomotives. They tried to observe this by not selecting the name Britannia for use on 70000 because it was already in use on one of the ex-LMS Jubilee Class locomotives, however Robert Riddles overruled them and the Jubilee had to be renamed. Britannia was initially based at Stratford (30A) in order to work East Anglian expresses to Norwich and Great Yarmouth, but was also particularly associated with the Hook Continental boat train to Harwich. Subsequently, the loco was based at Norwich Thorpe (w/e 31 January 1959) and March (June 1961) before spending the remainder of her career on the London Midland Region: Willesden (1A) (w/e 30 March 1963), Crewe North (5A) (w/e 25 May 1963), Crewe South (5B) (w/e 19 May 1965) and finally Newton Heath (9D) (w/e 5 March 1966) from where she was withdrawn w/e 28 May 1966. The locomotive pulled the funeral train of King George VI from King’s Lynn, Norfolk to London following his death in February 1952 at Sandringham House, Norfolk and Britannia had her cab roof painted white, as was the custom with royal locomotives. Britannia has also worn the white roof in preservation. Britannia was withdrawn in May 1966, after 15 years of service.

Initially destined for the National Railway Museum because of her cultural significance, she was stored. However, due to her prototype design and construction differences, the NRM chose standard sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell, instead. Britannia was eventually bought by Britannia Locomotive Company Ltd. She was eventually returned to steam on the Severn Valley Railway, where she remained between 1971 and 1980, in operational but non-mainline condition. With the society wishing to make more use of the locomotive, she was moved to the European gauge Nene Valley Railway in Peterborough, where she was also fitted with an air-brake compressor, and was based there from 1980-2000. Britannia made her return to the main line on 27 July 1991, successfully working enthusiast trips until 1997, and was featured in an episode of London’s Burning.

Due to the high cost of refurbishment, the locomotive was sold to Pete Waterman in 2000 with an expired mainline boiler certificate. She was Stored at Waterman’s workshops at the Crewe Heritage Centre, However the amount of work resulted in Waterman selling her to Jeremy Hosking. The locomotive underwent restoration at Crewe which involved a newly refurbished cab, a new smoke box and major work on the boiler; replacement steel sides, new crown stays, new front section barrel section, new steel and copper tubeplate, repairs and patches to door plate and major work to copper firebox.

In 2011 Britannia was Transferred to the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust (RSL&GT), and returned to main line operational condition in its prototype black British Railways livery (where it did not have nameplates fitted, as was thus known by railway convention as 70000). After a running-in period, in 2012 the locomotive was repainted in British Railways Brunswick Green, but with an early BR crest (unlike her sister 70013 Oliver Cromwell which carries BR’s Late Crest). On 24 January 2012, the loco hauled the Royal Train with Prince Charles on board to Wakefield Kirkgate, where he rededicated the locomotive. For the trip the loco again had a painted white cab roof, removed after the engine’s appearance at the West Somerset Railway’s Spring Gala. After extensive work to the locomotive over three years, the team of engineers at LNWR(H) completed the rebuilding of the locomotive and successfully returned her to steam at their Crewe Diesel Depot.

The final vistor for the 2018 Severn Valley Railway autumn Steam Gala is Ex LNER Q6 Class/NER T2 0-8-0 heavy freight locomotive no. 3395, Ex BR 63395. It was originally theThe North Eastern Railway Class T2, but was reclassified as Class Q6 by the LNER. It is one of One-hundred-and-twenty which were originally built at Darlington Works and Armstrong Whitworth between 1913 and 1921 to the design of Vincent Raven, based on the NER Class T and T1 (LNER Q5). LNER Q6 3395 was built in 1918 And is normally on the North York Moors Railway.

 

 

C.B. Collett CME

The great Western Railways’ Chief Mechanical locomotive Engineer Charles Benjamin Collett was born 10 September 1871. He was educated at Merchant Taylors School and City and Guilds Engineering College in South Kensington, London, England, before he was made chief mechanical engineer of the Great Western Railway from 1922 to 1941. He designed (amongst others) the GWR’s 4-6-0 Castle and King Class express passenger locomotives. Collett’s predecessor, George Jackson Churchward had delivered to the GWR from Swindon a series of class leading and innovative locomotives, and arguably by the early 1920s the Great Western‘s 2-cylinder and 4-cylinder 4-6-0 designs were substantially superior to the locomotives of the other railway groupings.In 1922 Churchward retired, and Charles Benjamin Collett inherited a legacy of excellent standardised designs. But, with costs rising and revenues falling, there was a need to rationalise the number of pre-grouping designs and to develop more powerful locomotives.

Collett was a practical development engineer and gifted, technical Engineer who could look at existing designs and reliably improve them. he took Churchward’s designs and developed them – the Hall from the Saint class, and the Castle from the Star, in this way Collett was able to produce a standardized fleet of locomotives ideally suited to the GWR’s requirements. He was able to extract substantial performance gains out of the Churchward designs, and the Castle Class was testament to this.He was also responsible for more humble locomotives, such as many of the pannier tank classes. However he received criticism from contemporary engineers and later railway historians for undertaking very little innovation in his designs, instead sticking with Churchward’s style in every case. Arguably this meant that by the time Collett retired the superiority of Great Western locomotives was lost to more modern designs, particularly those of William Stanier, who worked at Swindon before moving to the LMS in 1932, and took Churchward’s style with him but developed it in line with the progression in steam technology.

Some of the classes which Charles Collett designed were the 1101 Class (0-4-0 T): 1101–1106, 1366 Class (0-6-0 PT): 1366–1371, 1400 Class (0-4-2 T): 1400–1474, 2251 Class (0-6-0): 2200–2299, 3200–3219, 2884 Class (2-8-0): 2884–2899, 3800–3864, 3100 Class (2-6-2 T): 3100–3104, Earl or Dukedog Class (4-4-0), Castle Class (4-6-0): 4073–4099, 5000–something bigger than the Castle class was required to haul heavy expresses at an average speed of 60 mph.something bigger than the Castle class was required to haul heavy expresses at an average speed of 60 mph.5099, 7000–7037, 4575 Class (2-6-2 T): 4575– 4599, 5500– 5574, 4800 Class (0-4-2 T): 4800– 4874 (later 1400–1474), Hall Class (4-6-0): 4900– 4999, 5900– 5999, 6900– 6958, 5101 Class (2-6-2 T): 5101–5199, 4100–4179, 5205 Class (2-8-0 T): 5205–5264, 5400 Class (0-6-0 PT): 5400–5424, 5600 Class (0-6-2 T): 5600–5699, 6600–6699, 5700 Class (0-6-0 PT): 57xx, 67xx, 77xx, 87xx, 97xx, 36xx, 37xx, 46xx, 96xx, 5800 Class (0-4-2 T): 5800–5819, King Class (4-6-0): 6000–6029, 6100 Class (2-6-2 T): 6100–6169, 6400 Class (0-6-0 PT): 6400–6439, Grange Class (4-6-0):6800–6879, 7200 Class (2-8-2 T): 7200–7253, 7400 Class (0-6-0 PT): 7400–7449, Manor Class (4-6-0): 7800– 7829, 8100 Class (2-6-2 T): 8100–8109, GWR diesel shunters: Diesel shunters 1 and 2 and GWR railcars: Diesel railcars 1–38

In 1926, Great Western’s General Manager Sir Felix Pole told Collett to proceed with the design and construction of a “Super-Castle” to haul heavy expresses at an average speed of 60 mph. The result was the King class 4-6-0 design which emerged from Swindon works in June 1927. This had dimensions never previously seen, and represented the ultimate development of Churchward’s four cylinder concept. It was the heaviest (136 tons), and had the highest tractive effort (40,300 lbs.) of any 4-6-0 locomotive ever to run in the United Kingdom. However Because of its weight, the King class was restricted to a limited number of routes. It was also under Collett’s control that diesel power first appeared on the GWR. He introduced the first streamlined rail cars in 1934 and by 1942 38 had been built, although the latter ones had more angular styling. Some were configured for long distance express services with buffet counters, others for branch line or parcels work, and some were designed as two-car sets.

Charles Collett sadly passed away 5 April 1952 but he leaves a long lasting legacy in the form of some excellent locomotives many of which are still in steam thanks to the dedication and hard work of many steam railway enthusiasts at various heritage lines such as the Great Central, North York Moors, East Lancashire, Severn Valley and Bluebell railways.

Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala 2018

The LMS ROyal Scott class 4-6-0 No. 46100 Royal Scot is due to appear at the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala alongside Duchess of Sutherland and Q6 No. 63395. LMS 46100 Royal Scot was the first of its class. It was built in 1927 by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow and was named Royal Scot after the Royal Scots. It became the flagship locomotive of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company, operating the fastest services on the West Coast from London to Manchester and Glasgow. In 1933, 6152 The King’s Dragoon Guardsman and 6100 swapped identities permanently. 6152 had been built at Derby Works in 1930. The new Royal Scot was sent to the Century of Progress Exposition in Chigago during 1933 and toured Canada and the United States with a full rake of LMS carriages, even crossing the Rocky Mountains.

LMS 46100 Royal Scot

After returning to England it was given special commemorative plates that sit below its nameplates which read:

“This locomotive with the Royal Scot train was exhibited at the Century of Progress Exposition Chicago 1933, and made a tour of the Dominion of Canada and the United States of America. The engine and train covered 11,194 miles over the railroads of the North American continent and was inspected by 3,021,601 people.
W. Gilbertson – Driver T. Blackett – Fireman
J. Jackson – Fireman W.C. Woods – Fitter”

Following nationalisation of the big four railway compaines (GWR, LMS, LNER, SR) into British Railways in 1948, 6100 was renumbered 46100. In 1950 46100 was rebuilt with a 2A taper boiler, and the words “Prior to conversion” were added to its nameplates. It became a markedly different engine. In October 1962 46100 was withdrawn from service in Nottingham. It was bought by Billy Butlin of Butlins holiday camps after withdrawal and after cosmetic restoration into LMS crimson lake at Crewe Works, although this was the original livery received, the locomotive did not carry it after being rebuilt (only one rebuilt Royal Scot ever carried LMS crimson lake livery and that was 6170 British Legion). It was then towed from Crewe Works to Nottingham by Black 5 No. 45038 and then from Nottingham to Boston by B1 No. 61177 on 12 June 1963. After spending a few days at Boston shed it was taken to Skegness by an Ivatt 4MT. Then it languished in the goods yard for 3 weeks before being taken by a Pickford’s low loader for the short road trip to Ingoldmells.

Royal Scot arrived at Butlins on 18 July 1963 piped in by pipers from the 1st Battalion, The Royal Scots. This made 6100 one of two preserved rebuilt Royal Scots, the other being 6115 Scots Guardsman. It was set on a plinth at Skegness and was to remain there till the 1970s. On 16 March 1971 6100 departed from Skegness for the Bressingham Steam Museum and was returned to steam in 1972. It ran until 1978 when it once more became a static exhibit, it was eventually sold from Butlins to Bressingham in May 1989.

After sale to the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust (RSL&GT) in April 2009, chaired by enthusiast Jeremy Hosking, it was moved by road to Pete Waterman’s LNWR Heritage workshops in Crewe. On 2009, Royal Scot caught fire en route to a steam gala at the West Somerset Railway. The locomotive was being transported along the M5 Motorway when a fire started on the lorry under the loco’s leading wheels. The engine was later withdrawn from service due to a number of mechanical problems after completion from its previous restoration and it was decided to give the engine a complete overhaul to mainline standards. She performed her light and loaded test runs on Tue 22 & Wed 23 December 2015 and worked her debut railtour on Sat 6 February 2016 and also appeared at the Severn Valley Railway Steam Gala.

Princess Royal class Locomotive No 46233 Duchess of Sutherland is also due to appear at the Severn Valley Railway Autumn Steam Gala 2018. No 6233 Duchess of Sutherland was outshopped in July 1938 from Crewe Works and was part of the third batch of her class. These were unstreamlined, painted in LMS standard crimson lake livery and had a single chimney and no smoke deflectors and an estimated cost of £13,800 each. 6233 was initially allocated to Camden, London. It acquired a double chimney in March 1941 and because of drifting smoke acquired smoke deflectors in September 1945 before being painted in postwar LMS black livery in September 1946.

Following the creation of British Railways on 1 January 1948 it was allocated to Crewe North depot. BR renumbered the locomotive to 46233 in October 1948 and repainted it in BR Brunswick green livery in 1952 or early 1953. In June 1958 it was allocated to Carlisle Upperby before eventually being withdrawn from Edge Hill depot in February 1964. During its 25 years service Duchess of Sutherland ran 1,650,000 miles – the second highest mileage by any member of the class. After being Withdrawn by British Railways in 1964, the locomotive was originally sold to Butlins holiday camp in Scotland. In 1996, the locomotive was acquired by The Princess Royal Class Locomotive Trust with the intention of restoration to mainline condition . In 2001, 46233 was restored to operating condition and since then has been a regular performer on the national network.

LNER Peppercorn A1 4-6-2 Pacific no: 60163 “Tornado” may also be spending the winter at the Severn Valley Railway this year,

In addition The GWR 78xx 4-6-0 Manor class locomotive 7819 Hinton Manor also returned to the SEvern Valley Railway On 22 August 2018 The loco had previously been on display at the designer shopping outlet in Swindon for eleven years. The shopping outlet is built on the site of the former Great Western Railway works. It was carefully removed from the building by a specialised SVR team, and travelled by road back to Kidderminster, thanks to hauliers Allelys Group. The locomotive is now on display at Kidderminster, Until after the August bank holiday weekend,

Fifteen Guineas Special

August 11 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the 1T57 Fifteen Guinea Special rail tour which took place 11 August 1968. It was organised to mark the last occasion a steam hauled passenger train could legally run on the mainline in the United Kingdom before British Rail introduced a Steam ban the following day. It ran from Liverpool via Manchester to Carlisle and back, and was pulled by four different steam locomotives in turn during the four legs of the journey (with two engines sharing the third leg). The Fifteen Guinea Special was so named because of the high price for tickets on the railtour (15 guineas = £15 15s 0d in pre-decimal British currency). Ticket prices had been inflated due to the high demand to travel on the last BR steam-hauled mainline train.

The end of steam-hauled trains on British Railways was a turning point in the history of rail travel in Britain. The BR steam ban was introduced the day after the railtour, on 12 August 1968, making the Fifteen Guinea Special the last steam-hauled passenger train to be run by BR on its standard gauge network (though BR would continue to operate three steam locomotives on the narrow gauge Vale of Rheidol line until it was privatised in 1989). After this point all trains in Britain would be hauled by diesel or electric power, with the exception of privately owned heritage railways and privately run charters that are now able to run on the mainline provided that the steam locomotive has received necessary certification. The only steam locomotive to which the ban did not apply was Flying Scotsmandue to a clause in the contract in which she was purchased from BR in 1963. Several other railtours had already marked the end of steam haulage on other parts of the British (not UK) network.

During most of these railtours, the Fifteen Guinea Special included, the line was flanked with large crowds due to the high popularity of steam engines and the belief that it was highly unlikely that they would be allowed back onto the network, although in the event steam specials on BR lines were introduced only three years later in 1971. All but one of the locomotives that hauled the train passed into preservation. 45110 now resides on the Severn Valley Railway and has been named RAF Biggin Hill. 44871 is currently mainline operational and resides on the East Lancashire Railway and 70013 Oliver Cromwell is now part of the National Collection and was restored to mainline running in 2008. It is based on the Great Central Railway. The only one not preserved LMS Black 5 no 44781 was used for filming of the film The Virgin Soldiers, for which it was derailed and hung at an angle for visual effect. After filming was completed, an enthusiast tried to purchase her, but was unable to find the money needed, so she was then sold for scrap and eventually cut up.

To celebrate the 40th Anniversary of 1T57′ and end of steam on British Railways a re-run of the tour ran on Sunday 10 August 2008 (as 11 August was a Monday in 2008). To celebrate the 50th Anniversary on the Severn Valley Railway both 45110 and 48773 were removed from the Engine House at Highley and put on display at Kidderminster. Other railtours have also been organised to commemorate the event involving 44781, 44871 and 70013 – Oliver Cromwell.

The original tour ran from Liverpool Lime Street-Manchester Victoria-Carlisle-Manchester Victoria-Liverpool Lime Street. Class 5 45110 went from Liverpool Lime Street to Manchester Victoria! While Britannia Class 70013 Oliver Cromwell travelled from Manchester Victoria to Carlisle! While Stanier Class 5 44871 and LMS Stanier Class 5 44781 travelled from Carlisle to Manchester Victoria and LMS Class 5 45110 Travelled from Manchester Victoria to Liverpool Lime Street. Locomotives used during the re-run in 2008 Included Stanier Class 8F 48151, Britannia class 70013 Oliver Cromwell, LMS Stanier Class 5 45407 (as first choice, 44871 was under overhaul) and LMS Class 5 45231. LMS Class 5 45110 was not used as its mainline certificate had expired. However, 45110 ran over the Severn Valley Railway on 11 August 2008 with a special 1T57 service. This was 45110’s last day in service with its at-the-time boiler certificate which had expired. LMS Class 5 45305 was allocated to the original train back in 1968 but failed the night before and was replaced by 45110.

The 15 Guinea Special at Barton Moss on the last leg from Manchester Victoria to Liverpool Lime Street hauled by Stanier 5MT 45110.The railtour started at 09:10 from Liverpool Lime Street. It was hauled by LMS Class 5 45110 to Manchester Victoria, arriving 8 minutes late at 10:42. No. 45110 was replaced with Britannia Class loco no. 70013 Oliver Cromwell – the last steam locomotive to be overhauled by BR – and the train departed for Carlisle at 11:06. The train arrived at Carlisle, 33 minutes late, at 15:29. For the first part of the return leg, two LMS Stanier Class 5 locomotives, 44781 and 44871, double-headed the train back to Manchester Victoria. The train departed Carlisle at 15:44 – 14 minutes late – and arrived in Manchester at 19:00, 12 minutes late. Re-joining the train at Victoria station, 45110 then worked the remainder of the journey back to Liverpool Lime Street, arriving only 9 minutes late at 19:59

Severn Valley Railway Steam on the Road

The Severn Valley Railway’s Steam on the Road event takes place  at Kidderminster Station. The event showcases the very best of steam on the road, and steam on the rails! From steamrollers, traction engines and steam wagons and features a variety of full size traction engines, and up to 4 miniature engines including roadgoing steam vehicles, Steam Rollers, traction engines, Showmans Engines and steam wagons which will be on display and in operation in the car park and on the Station forecourt, plus Plimsoll, the Road/Rail Series 1 Land Rover will be on the line.

 

Visiting Steam Vehicles include No. 4093 Dororthy, Burrell Road Locomotive, No. 8064, Wallis & Steevens 8 Ton Advance, No. 17480 Survivor, Fowler DNB Steam Roller, No. 2547 Endurance, Burrell Showmans Road Locomotive, Trotter 1 Ton Steam Roller, No. 7248 Pedler, Wallis & Steevens General Purpose Engine, No. 12770, Foden Tractor, No. 26839, Ransomes Sims & Jefferies General Purpose Engine, No. 1592 Tasker B2 Tractor, No. 1310 Foden Agricultural Tractor

There are also Steam Trains running on the Severn Valley Railway including Brakevan rides on GWR 0-6-0 tank engine No. 1450 at Kidderminster station. Plus A Display of vintage tractors, And a Road run through Kidderminster each day, culminating with a climb up the hill to Kidderminster Station, A Beer Festival on the concourse, with approximately 15 Real Ales and 10 Traditional Ciders & Perries on offer. Miniature steam locomotives will also be opperating on the Coalyard Miniature Railway. Plus Live entertaintment fromlocal band Blind Lemon at Kidderminster on Saturday evening, in association with Kidderminster Arts Festival

Plimsoll, the road-rail Land Rover will also be running along the whole length of the line. Plimsoll is a 1957 Series 1 Land Rover which has a 1997cc four-cylinder petrol engine, a four-speed main gearbox and a two-speed transfer box with selectable four-wheel-drive and can run on rails. At Hampton Loade there will be a display of more Land rovers. Meanwhile At Bridgnorth station there will be a Display of commercial vehicles and Mechanical Horses.

The Severn Valley Railway Wizard Express takes place on 1st, 15th and 22nd August 2018. Passengers will be required to collect their wax-sealed invitation to Wizard School at Kidderminster, Before leaving from Platform 92/4 and embarking on a journey along the Severn valley Railway towards the Engine House at Highley. On arrival at Highley, you will be greeted by a figure of GIANT proportions who will escort you to The Engine House, where the Wizard School’s finest Scholars will be ready to meet you.

once At the Wizards school Passengers will be given mystical lessons of wizardry From magical characters. And will be taught the masterclasses of trickery; including Broomstick Training, Wand Making and Greenhouse Herbology and successful students will be awarded  graduation certificate upon completion of the lessons. Other spellbinding activities include Magicians who will amaze you with unbelievable acts of prestidigitation right before your eyes.