Kate Mosse OBE

Best known for writing some fantastic novels including Labyrinth, Sepulchre, Citadel, The Taxidermist’s Daughter, the Cave, the Mistletoe bride and The Burning Chamber, Bestselling Novellist Kate Mosse OBE was born 20 October 1961 in Chichester and was educated at Chichester High School For Girls and New College, Oxford. She graduated from university in 1981 with a BA (Hons) in English. After graduation, she spent seven years in publishing in London, working for Hodder & Stoughton, then Century, and finally as an editorial director at Hutchinson, part of the Random House Group. She was a member of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) and Women in Publishing. She left publishing in 1992, to begin her writing career and to help setting up a new literary prize, and published two works of non-fiction and two novels. Mosse married old school friend Greg, after meeting him again ten years later on a train by chance and currently lives with him and her family in Chichester and Carcassonne after having bought a small house in Carcassonne in the Languedoc region of southwest France, the inspiration for her bestselling trilogy of historical timeslip novels Labyrinth, Sepulchre and Citadel. She moved back to her home town of Chichester in 1998 to take the position of executive director of Chichester Festival Theatre.

In 2001, she began writing the first of the series, Labyrinth, which was published in 2005. Her bestselling books have sold millions of copies in more than 40 countries. Although best known for her adventure and ghost fiction, inspired by real history, Mosse’s first two works were non-fiction. Becoming A Mother (in its seventh edition) was published by Virago in 1993, followed in 1995 by The House: Behind the Scenes at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, published by BBC Books to accompany the award-winning BBC 2 fly-on-the-wall documentary series of the same name. She then turned her hand to fiction, publishing two contemporary novels. Eskimo Kissing, about a young, adopted woman searching for her background, was published to critical acclaim in 1996. This was followed in 1998 by the biotech thriller, Crucifix Lane.

Part of Labyrinth is set in Medieval Carcasonne during 1209 on the night before a brutal civil crusade to rid the land of Cathars and concerns a young woman named Alais (Jessica Brown Findlay) who works as a healer and herbalist and finds a dead man in the river with his thumb cut off. Anais then finds herself custodian of the mysterious Book of Words, Although she cannot understand the symbols and diagrams the book contains, Alais finds out that the book could reveal the location of The Holy Grail itself and knows her destiny lies in protecting their secret, at all costs, Meanwhile back in modern day Languedoc an amatuer Archeologist named Alice Tanner (Vanessa Kirby) discovers two skeletons during an archaeological dig in a mysterious cave which has strange symbols drawn on the walls and contains a Ring. She begins to suspect that that she has unearthed a link with a horrific and brutal past. But it’s not just the sight of the shattered bones that makes her uneasy; there’s an overwhelming sense of evil in the tomb that Alice finds hard to shake off. Puzzled by the words carved inside the chamber, Alice has an uneasy feeling that she has disturbed something which was meant to remain hidden and finds herself drawn into a conspiricy involving an age old mystery concerning The location of the Book of Words and the Holy Grail. Television rights were sold to Scott Free and Tandem Communications and the Labyrinth miniseries was broadcast in 2013. The cast included John Hurt, Janet Suzman, Jessica Brown Findlay, Tom Felton, and Sebastian Stan.

In October 2007, the second novel in the trilogy, Sepulchre, was published. A tale of haunting and Tarot set in 18th Century Paris and Languedoc and 20th-century France, it was also a number one bestseller in the UK and an international bestseller which starts In 1891 and features, Leone Vernier, a young girl living in Paris until she is invited to live at Domaine de la Cade, a stately home in Rennes-les-Bains, which is owned by Léonie’s deceased uncle Jules and his wife Isolde. Meanwhile In the present day, an American, Meredith Martin, is in France to research the life of Claude Debussy for a biography she is writing. She is also trying to find out more about her biological mother and she visits Domaine de la Cade, which has been turned into a hotel and uncovers information that links her lineage to that of Léonie Vernier and discovers the terrifying events that occurred in the haunted abandoned Sepulchre which is situated in the grounds of Domaine de la Cade. the stories of Léonie and Meredith are brought together by a series of visions that are related to the Sepulchre, in the grounds of the Domaine de la Cade

Citadel, the third novel in the trilogy, came out in 2013 and was also an international bestseller. Inspired by the real history of the resistance in Carcassonne during World War II, Set in and around Carcassonne and the Languedoc region of France, it features an imagined all-female resistance unit. it explores the incredible history, legends and hidden secrets of the area. Set during World War II in the far south of France, the novel is described as a powerful, action-packed mystery that reveals the secrets of the resistance under Nazi occupation. While war blazed in the trenches at the front, back at home a different battle is waged, full of clandestine bravery, treachery and secrets. And as a cell of resistance fighters, codenamed Citadelle, fight for everything they hold dear, their struggle will reveal an older, darker combat being fought in the shadows. Combining the rugged action of LABYRINTH with the haunting mystery of SEPULCHRE, CITADEL is a story of daring and courage, of lives risked for beliefs and of astonishing secrets buried in time. While Mosse was researching Citadel, she released The Winter Ghosts in 2009, based on a novella she previously contributed to the Quick Reads Initiative. Film rights have been sold to Ruby Films and in October 2013, Mosse’s collection of short stories, The Mistletoe Bride & Other Haunting Tales, was published – a collection of ghost stories inspired by traditional folk tales and country legends from England and France, throughout Sussex, Brittany and the Languedoc. There has also been a lavish two-part 2013 TV adaptation based on Kate Mosse’s novel Labyrinth which was made by Ridley Scott’s production company, Scott Free.

Jonathan Swift

Satirist, essayist, poet and cleric Jonathan Swift sadly passed away on 19 October 1745 (aged 77), shortly after having a stroke. He was born 30 November 1667. He is remembered for works such as Gulliver’s Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, Drapier’s Letters, The Battle of the Books, An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity, and A Tale of a Tub. Swift’s family had several interesting literary connections: His grandmother, Elizabeth (Dryden) Swift, was the niece of Sir Erasmus Dryden, grandfather of the poet John Dryden. The same grandmother’s aunt, Katherine (Throckmorton) Dryden, was a first cousin of Elizabeth, wife of Sir Walter Raleigh. His great-great grandmother, Margaret (Godwin) Swift, was the sister of Francis Godwin, author of The Man in the Moone which influenced parts of Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. His uncle, Thomas Swift, married a daughter of the poet and playwright Sir William Davenant, a godson of William Shakespeare. He is probably the foremost prose satirist in the English language, and is less well known for his poetry. Swift originally published all of his works under pseudonyms – such as Lemuel Gulliver, Isaac Bickerstaff, MB Drapier – or anonymously. He is also known for being a master of two styles of satire: the Horatian and Juvenalian styles.

In February 1702, Swift received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Trinity College, Dublin. He then traveled to England and returned to Ireland in October, accompanied by Esther Johnson and his friend Rebecca Dingley, another member of William Temple’s household. During his visits to England in these years Swift published A Tale of a Tub and The Battle of the Books (1704) and began to gain a reputation as a writer. This led to close, lifelong friendships with Alexander Pope, John Gay, and John Arbuthnot, forming the core of the Martinus Scriblerus Club. Swift also went to London many times & was recruited by The Tory Party to support their cause as editor of The Examiner. In 1711, Swift published the political pamphlet “The Conduct of the Allies & became part of the inner circle of the Tory government, and often acted as mediator between Henry St John (Viscount Bolingbroke) the secretary of state for foreign affairs (1710–15) and Robert Harley (Earl of Oxford) lord treasurer and prime minister (1711–14).

After the death of Queen Anne in 1714 and accession of George I, the Tory leaders were tried for treason for conducting secret negotiations with France so Swift returned to Ireland, where he began to support of Irish causes, producing some of his most memorable works: Proposal for Universal Use of Irish Manufacture (1720), Drapier’s Letters (1724), and A Modest Proposal (1729), earning him the status of an Irish patriot. He began writing Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts, by Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, and then a captain of several ships, better known as Gulliver’s Travels.

In 1726 he visited London, staying with his old friends Alexander Pope, John Arbuthnot and John Gay, who helped him arrange for the anonymous publication of Gulliver’s Travels in 1726 It was immediately successful and was translated into. French, German, and Dutch.Swift returned to England one more time in 1727 but The visit was cut short when Swift received word that Esther Johnson was dying and rushed back home to be with her. On 28 January 1728, Esther Johnson died. Sadly After this, Death became a frequent feature in Swift’s life. In 1731 he wrote Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift. Sadly by 1738 Swift began to show signs of illness, and in 1742 he may have suffered a stroke, losing the ability to speak. Following his death he was buried in his own cathedral by Esther Johnson’s side, in accordance with his wishes. The bulk of his fortune (twelve thousand pounds) was left to found a hospital for the mentally ill, which opened in 1757. There have also been many film Animation and Television adaptations made of of the novel. including the 1939 version, a Hallmark version starring Ted Danson as Lemuel Gulliver, and the most recent one starring Jack Black.

 

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S.Lewis🦁🚪🧙‍♀️

The first book in the Chronicles of Narnia series “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” was published by C.S. Lewis on October 16 1950. It starts In 1940, and concerns four siblings – Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie  who are evacuated from London during World War II In order to escape the Blitz and are sent to the countryside to live with professor Digory Kirke. Whilst exploring the professor’s house, Lucy finds a wardrobe which doubles as a magic portal in a mythical land called Narnia. Which is under the spell of an evil White witch called Jadis.

In Narnia Lucy meets Tumnus, a faun, who invites her to tea in his home. There the faun confesses that he invited her not out of hospitality, but with the intention of betraying her to the White Witch. The witch has ruled Narnia for years, using magic to keep it frozen in a perpetual winter. She has ordered all Narnians to turn in any humans (“Sons of Adam” or “Daughters of Eve”) they come across. But now that he has come to know and like a human, Tumnus decides to escort Lucy back to the lamppost instead. Lucy returns through the wardrobe and finds that only a few seconds have passed in normal time during her absence. Her siblings do not believe her story about another world inside the wardrobe, which is now found to have a solid back panel.

During another game of hide-and-seek, Lucy again passes into Narnia. This time her brother Edmund follows her. In Narnia Edmund meets Jadis, who calls herself Queen of Narnia and acts friendly. When she learns that he is human and has two sisters and a brother. She urges him to bring his siblings to her castle, promising in return to make him her heir, however she has a sinister ulterior motive. When Lucy and Edmund return together through the wardrobe, Edmund realizes that the queen he met and the witch Lucy describes are one and the same. He denies to the others that he has been in Narnia at all. Peter and Susan are puzzled by Lucy’s insistence, and consult the Professor.

Soon afterward, all four children enter Narnia together after hiding in the wardrobe to avoid the professor’s dour housekeeper, Mrs. Macready. Remembering the winter cold ahead, they take coats from the wardrobe before exploring. Lucy guides them to Tumnus’s cave, but they find it ransacked, with a notice from Jadis (the White Witch) proclaiming his arrest for harbouring humans. A talking beaver intercepts them, proves himself a friend, and hides the children in his den. There, he and Mrs. Beaver tell them of a prophecy that Jadis’s power will fail when two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve fill the four thrones at Cair Paravel. Aslan, the great lion and the rightful King, has been absent for many years but is now “on the move again” in Narnia. Edmund creeps away unseen to Jadis’s castle, which is filled with statues of Narnian victims she has turned to stone. Jadis is furious when Edmund appears alone and angrier still to learn that Aslan may have returned. She takes him on her sledge to catch the others or to reach Aslan’s court before them.

Meanwhile, Mr Beaver realises that Edmund has betrayed them, and they set off at once to seek Aslan at the Stone Table. As they travel, the Witch’s spell over Narnia begins to break: Father Christmas (who has not been seen in Narnia for a hundred years) arrives with magical presents: a sword for Peter, a horn and a bow with arrows for Susan, a knife and a bottle of healing cordial for Lucy. As the snow starts to thaw they meet Aslan who welcomes the children and the Beavers to his camp near the Stone Table. Upon hearing Edmund’s situation, he orders a rescue party of loyal Narnians.

Despite his treachery, Edmund is eventually rescued and reunited with his siblings. Jadis approaches in truce to parley with Aslan. She insists that, according to “deep magic from the dawn of time”, she holds the right to kill Edmund following his treason And Aslan pays a heavy price for Edmunds treachery. Now confident of victory, Jadis the White Witch, leads her army away to battle. However Much to Jadis’s surprise The Stone Table breaks and Aslan unexpectedly reappears. Then Aslan, Susan and Lucy travel to Jadis’s Castle to rescue everyone who has been turned to stone by Jadis. Meanwhile, Peter and Edmund lead the rest of the Narnians against Jadis, however Edmund is seriously wounded. Then Aslan arrives with  reinforcements and Aslan, Edmund, Susan, Peter and Lucy all lead the Narnians in an exciting Battle against Jadis and the forces of evil…

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

The novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë was published October 16 1847. it takes place in the north of England, during the reign of George III (1760–1820). It features a character named Jane Eyre who spent her childhood at Gateshead Hall, with her maternal uncle’s family, the Reeds, Where she is emotionally and physically abused by her aunt and cousins. The nursemaid Bessie proves to be Jane’s only ally in the household, even though Bessie sometimes harshly scolds Jane. Excluded from the family activities, Jane is incredibly unhappy, with only a doll and books for comfort. One day, she has an altercation with her cousin John Reed and is locked in the red room where her uncle died; there, she faints from panic after she thinks she has seen his ghos

She is subsequently attended to by the kindly apothecary Mr. Lloyd to whom Jane reveals how unhappy she is living at Gateshead Hall. He recommends to Mrs. Reed that Jane should be sent to school. So she is sent to Lowood Institution, a harsh charity school for girls under the sinister Mr. Brocklehurst, where she befriends an older girl, Helen Burns and Miss Temple, the caring superintendent, who helps Jane’s self-defence against Brocklehurst’s accusations. The 80 pupils at Lowood are subjected to cold rooms, poor meals, and thin clothing. Many students fall ill when a typhus epidemic strikes, and Jane’s friend Helen dies. When Mr. Brocklehurst’s maltreatment of the students is discovered, several benefactors erect a new building and install a sympathetic management committee to moderate Mr. Brocklehurst’s harsh rule. Conditions at the school then improve dramatically.

After six years as a student and two as a teacher at Lowood, Jane leaves Lowood and advertises her services as a governess and receives one reply, from Alice Fairfax, housekeeper at Thornfield Hall. Jane takes the position, teaching Adèle Varens, a young French girl. Jane encounters Edward Rochester, master of Thornfield Hall and discovers that Adèle is his ward, left in his care when her mother abandoned her. Odd things start to happen at the house, such as a strange laugh, a mysterious fire in Mr. Rochester’s room (from which Jane saves Rochester), and an attack on a house guest named Mr. Mason. Then Jane learns that her aunt Mrs. Reed is calling for her, after suffering a stroke when her son John died, so Jane returns to Gateshead to attend to her dying aunt. The villainous Mrs. Reed gives Jane a letter from Jane’s paternal uncle, Mr. John Eyre, in which he asks for her to live with him and be his heir. Mrs. Reed admits to telling Mr. Eyre that Jane had died of fever at Lowood.

Back at Thornfield, Mr. Rochester is betrothed to the beautiful and talented, but snobbish and heartless, Blanche Ingram. However Jane reveals her feelings for him. Rochester learns that Jane is in love with him, so he proposes, however Jane is sceptical at first but eventually believes him and gladly agrees to marry him. As she prepares for her wedding, a strange woman sneaks into Jane’s room one night and rips her wedding veil in two. Mr. Rochester attributes the incident to Grace Poole, one of his servants. During the wedding ceremony, Mr. Mason and a lawyer declare that Mr. Rochester cannot marry because he is already married to Mr. Mason’s sister, Bertha. Mr. Rochester admits this is true but discovered that she was rapidly descending into congenital madness, so he locked her away in Thornfield, hiring Grace Poole as a nurse to look after her. When Grace got drunk, Rochester’s wife escaped and caused the mysterious events at Thornfield. Jane also discovers that her uncle, Mr. John Eyre, is a friend of Mr. Mason’s. Mr. Rochester asks Jane to go with him to the south of France, and live with him as husband and wife, even though they cannot be married. Refusing to go against her principles, and despite her love for him, Jane leaves Thornfield.

Jane leaves Thornfield. Tired and hungry She eventually arrives at the home of Diana and Mary Rivers, but is turned away by the housekeeper. She collapses on the doorstep. Luckily St. John Rivers, Diana, Mary’s brother and a clergyman, save her. After she recovers Jane gets a teaching position at a nearby village school. St. John learns Jane’s true identity and astounds her by telling her that her uncle, John Eyre, has died and left her his entire fortune of 20,000 pounds (equivalent to over £1.3 million in 2011 and reveals more about John Eyre. Jane, discover that she has more living family members, and Diana and Mary come back to live at Moor House. St. John then asks Jane to marry him and to go with him to India. Jane initially accepts going to India but suggests they travel as brother and sister instead. Jane then returns to Thornfield but discovers that tragedy has befallen Mr Rochester…

Orson Welles

American actor, director, writer and producer George Orson Welles Sadly died On October 10, 1985, after having a heart attack at his home in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. He was born May 6, 1915 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He worked extensively in theatre, radio and film and is best remembered for his innovative work in all three media, most notably Caesar (1937), a groundbreaking Broadway adaption of Julius Caesar and the debut of the Mercury Theatre; The War of the Worlds (1938), the most famous broadcast in the history of radio; and Citizen Kane (1941), which many critics and scholars name as the best film of all time. Welles directed a number of high-profile theatrical productions in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth and The Cradle Will Rock, but found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds performed for the radio drama anthology series Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was reported to have caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring, and although these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated, they rocketed Welles to instant notoriety. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which he wrote, produced, directed, and starred in as Charles Foster Kane. It is often considered the greatest film ever made. Welles went on to directed thirteen critically acclaimed films in his career, including The Magnificent Ambersons, Journey into Fear, It’s All True, The Stranger, The Lady From Shanghai, Macbeth, The Third Man, Othello, Mr Arkadin, The Trial and Touch of Evil.

He was reknowned for His distinctive directorial style, which featured layered and nonlinear narrative forms, innovative uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unusual camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots, and long takes. He has been praised as a major creative force and as “the ultimate auteur.” Welles became Well known for his baritone voice, And was also a well regarded actor who won many wards. These other Welles films were nominated for their list: The Magnificent Ambersons (1942, director/producer/screenwriter); The Third Man (1949, actor); Touch of Evil (1958, actor/director/ screenwriter); and A Man for All Seasons (1966, actor). Citizen Kane was also nominated for numerous prizes at the 1941 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor in a Leading Role. The only Oscar won, however, was Best Original Screenplay, which Welles shared with Herman J. Mankiewicz.The Magnificent Ambersons was nominated for four 1942 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The Stranger was nominated for the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1947. Othello won the Palme d’Or at the 1952 Cannes Film Festival.

In 1968 Welles was nominated for Best Foreign Actor in a Leading Role at the 21st British Academy Film Awards for his performance in Chimes at Midnight. Welles was given the first Career Golden Lion award in the Venice Film Festival in 1970, during the same year Welles was given an Academy Honorary Award for “superlative and distinguished service in the making of motion pictures.He was also awarded the French Légion d’honneur, the highest civilian decoration in France. He also recieved the American Film Institute Lifetime Achievement Award in 1975, and In 1978, Welles was presented with the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Career Achievement Award. In 1979, Welles was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame. In 1982, Welles was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture at the Golden Globe Awards for his role in Butterfly, and won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Recording for his role on Donovan’s Brain.

Welles was awarded a Fellowship of the British Film Institute in 1983 and In 1984, Welles was given the Directors Guild of America Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Welles as the 16th Greatest Male Star of All Time. When asked to describe Welles’s influence, Jean-Luc Godard remarked: “Everyone will always owe him everything.” Welles was also voted the greatest film director of all time in two separate British Film Institute polls among directors and critics, and a wide survey of critical consensus, best-of lists, and historical retrospectives calls him the most acclaimed director of all time. He was also voted number 16 in AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Stars list of the greatest American film actors of all time and The American Film.

Dune

A new science fiction film and spin-off television series Based on Frank Herbert’s original epic science fiction novel Dune is in the works and is being directed by Denis Villeneuve. It takes place in the distant future, in an intergalactic feudal society presided over by various noble families and one all-powerful emperor named Pradishah Shaddam IV. He controls the flow of an all-important and powerful spice called Melange And has employed Navigators to use Melange to “Fold Space”, this makes travelling vast distances through space possible. However Melange can only be found on the desolate planet of Arrakis and mining for Melange is a dangerous business thanks to Arrakis’ massive indigenous sandworms.

Duke Leto Atreides, ruler of the ocean planet Caladan, is despatched to the harsh desert planet of Arrakis – known colloquially as Dune – to oversee the mining of the spice Melange along with Leto’s son Paul, Paul’s mother the Lady Jessica, who is a member of the mysterious and sorcerous Bene Gesserit sisterhood who have been working towards creating a super-being known as the Kwisatz Haderach for centuries. Meanwhile Paul starts having prophetic dreams and shows signs of potentially becoming an all powerful Kwisatz Haderach, then his younger sister also starts showing some extraordinary abilities

Unfortunately the journey to Arrakis turns out to be a trap set for House Atreides by the Increasingly paranoid Emperor Shaddam IV and the corrupt House Harkonnen in an effort to control the spice Melange. House Atreides are attacked by the Harkonnen and Paul and Jessica are forced to flee into the desert, luckily they are rescued by the Native Fremen who dislike Emperor Shaddam IV and the Harkonnen and resent them strip miningArrakis for Melange. So Paul agrees to lead the Fremen in a high-stakes all out battle against the combined forces of Emperor Shaddam IV and the Harkonnen for control of the Spice Melange and ultimately the universe….

Doctor Who Series 23 Blu-Ray special edition

Doctor Who series 23 has been released on Blu-ray it features The Trial of a Time Lord and Events of the serial are framed on an arcing plot that carries through the other three serials of the 23rd season. The Trial of a Time-Lord sees the Sixth Doctor is forced to land the TARDIS aboard a Gallifreyan space station, where he is brought into a courtroom presided over by. The Inquisitor informs the Doctor he is on trial for conduct unbecoming a Time Lord; evidence will be presented by the Valeyard. It contains four adventures: The Mysterious Planet, Mindwarp, Terror of the Vervoids, and The Ultimate Foe Events

Mysterious planet concerns the Doctor’s involvement in the planet Ravolox, where the Valeyard shows that the Doctor meddled in the affairs of the planet. The Doctor is aware that Ravolox was devastated by a fireball, according to official records, but the presence of flourishing plant life make him suspicious. As they walk, they are observed by Sabalom Glitz and Dibber, mercenaries on the planet attempting to destroy a “black light” generator in order to destroy the L3 robot deep underground that it powers. The Doctor and Peri find a tunnel and enter to find remains that appear to be that of the Marble Arch tube station on the London Underground Central line, Unfortunately Peri is captured by a local human tribe, led by Katryca, who informs Peri that she will need to take many husbands for the tribe, (steady on, we’ve only just met) and locks her away with Glitz and Dibber; the two were captured after approaching the tribe to try to convince them to let them destroy the generator, which the tribe has taken as a totem.

Meanwhile The Doctor, in exploring the modern underground complex, is also captured by humans under watch by “the Immortal”. He is brought before the Immortal, the L3 robot that Glitz is looking for. The robot calls itself Drathro, and is following its instructions to maintain the habitat of the underground system. Peri, Glitz, and Dibber eventually meet up with the Doctor back at the ruins of Marble Arch, trapped between the tribe and a service robot. Unfortunately, the tribesmen recapture the group and when The Doctor tries to explain the nature of the tribe’s totem, but Katryca is unimpressed. Glitz then makes a startling revelation concerning Ravolox. Meanwhile Drathro reactivates, so Katryca decides they should attack Drathro’s “castle” to steal its technology for itself, however this does not go to plan
Meanwhile the Doctor and Peri use the opportunity to escape and re-enter the underground complex, despite the dangers posed by the Black Light Generator and Drathro. The Doctor then offers Drathro a solution regarding the black light system, and Glitz makes Drathro another tempting offer

In the second story Mindwarp The Valeyard presents his second piece of evidence for the prosecution, the Doctor and Peri’s activities on Thoros Beta, where the Doctor is investigating arms sales, where he sees his old adversary Sil. Sil’s race, the Mentors, are revealed to have been supplying Yrcanos, the local king of a Viking-like primitive culture, with advanced weaponry. Meanwhile, a scientist, Crozier, is preparing for surgery on Kiv, an influential Mentor whose brain is expanding. When the Doctor learns that Peri has been chosen as the new host for Kiv’s brain, he allies with Yrcanos to kill the Mentors however this has tragic consequences.

In the third story Terror of the Vervoids the Doctor begins to suspect that evidence is being tampered with. It takes place in the year 2986, and sees the Doctor and his new companion Mel answer a distress call from the interstellar ship Hyperion III. The ship is sabotaged and people are dying at the hands of the Vervoids, plant-like humanoids who the Doctor learns were genetically engineered to be slaves. So the Doctor and Mel try to stop the Vervoids running amok

In the final story the Ultimate Foe The Doctor claims that the Matrix has been deliberately altered, and the Keeper of the Matrix is summoned Seconds later, the Master appears on the Matrix’s screen. Sabalom Glitz and Mellearn of a deadly conspiracyconcerning The Doctor who finally discovers the the uncomfortable truth behind the Valeyard’s true identity and that his suspicions may have been right. The Valeyard and Master then resorts to extreme measures against the High Council while the Doctor tries to stop them. The Inquisitor then makes the Doctor a tempting offer and reveals what really happened to Peri. However Mel makes a disturbing discovery concerning the Keeper of the Matrix….