The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

I am currently watching the BBC Adaptation of Wilkie Collins fifth novel “The Woman in White”. It was written and published in 1859 and was Preceded by The Dead Secret and Followed by No Name.

It concerns a young art teacher named Walter Hartright, who encounters a mysterious and distressed woman dressed entirely in white, in London. She asks him if he lives in London, Walter replies he is leaving for Limmeridge, Cumberland to work as a drawing master to two sisters living at Limmeridge House. She reveals that she also once lived at Limmeridge and yearns to see the village and Limmeridge House again. Walter is greatly surprised by the coincidence. however before Walter can question the woman further, she becomes agitated and disappears. Later he learns that the woman in white has escaped from a lunatic asylum, Leaving Walter unsettled and perplexed,

Soon afterward, he travels to Limmeridge House in Cumberland, having been hired as a drawing master on the recommendation of his friend, Pesca, an Italian language master. The Limmeridge household comprises Frederick Fairlie, and Walter’s students: Miss Halcombe’s younger and very beautiful half-sister, Laura Fairlie, Mr. Fairlie’s niece, and Marian Halcombe, an intelligent and sensible young woman, devoted half-sister and elder of the two women. Walter discovers that Laura bears a strong resemblance to the woman in white; who he learns is Anne Catherick: a mentally disabled child who formerly lived near Limmeridge, and was devoted to Laura’s mother, who first dressed her in white

Walter is Intrigued by this and Laura’s engaging personality, and finds himself falling in love with Laura. However Laura is engaged to be married to Sir Percival Glyde, Baronet. Then Laura receives an anonymous letter warning her against marrying Glyde. Walter suspects Anne sent the letter and learns that Sir Percival, had her committed to a mental asylum. The family lawyer also starts having misgivings over the financial terms of the marriage settlement, which will give the entirety of Laura’s fortune to Glyde if she dies without leaving an heir.

Nevertheless Sir Percival and Laura Marry and return to his house, Blackwater Park in Hampshire; accompanied by Glyde’s friend, Count Fosco (who is married to Laura’s aunt). Marian also moves to Blackwater meanwhile Walter decides to move away. Glyde starts taking an unhealthy interest in Laura’s inheritance, and they begin to suspect he is not the gentleman they thought him to be. Sure enough he attempts to coerce Laura into giving him £20,000. Meanwhile Anne, also travels to Blackwater Park and contacts Laura concerning Glyde and Fosco. Miriam later discovers Fosco and Glyde plotting a devious scheme concerning Laura and Anne. Then Walter returns and investigates and learns that Glyde is hiding a big secret and finds himself embroiled in a convoluted web involving family secrets, dodgy dealing, financial troubles, Mistaken identity, betrayal and death….

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Troy:Fall of a City

The exciting eight part BBC historical epic Troy: Fall of a City has been released on DVD. It is based on the Trojan War and the love affair between Paris and Helen and is told from the perspective of the Trojan family at the heart of the events. The series is a co-production between BBC One and Netflix. It stars Louis Hunter as Paris, Bella Dayne as Helen of Troy, David Threlfall as Priam, Frances O’Connor as Hecuba, Tom Weston-Jones as Hector, Joseph Mawle as Odysseus, Chloe Pirrie as Andromache, Johnny Harris as Agamemnon, David Gyasi as Achilles, Jonas Armstrong as Menelaus, Alfred Enoch as Aeneas, Aimee-Ffion Edwards as Cassandra, Hakeem Kae-Kazim as Zeus, David Avery as Xanthius, Lex King as Aphrodite’ Amy Louise Wilson as Briseis, Inge Beckmann as Hera.

The war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked “for the fairest”. Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris, who judged that Aphrodite, as the “fairest”, should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus, fall in love with Paris of Troy who took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta back to Troy. This angered Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and the brother of Helen’s husband Menelaus, who led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy. Then launched an invasion force of approximately one thousand ships against Troy, which were full of the finest soldiers including Achilles, in an attempt to recover Helen, and they besieged the city for ten years.

The siege caused widespread destruction and claimed the lives of thousands of innocent and not so innocent people including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris. Things finally came to a head thanks to a cunning ruse involving a wooden horse. The Achaeans managed to slaughter the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods’ wrath. Consequently Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many died or founded colonies in distant shores.

The Trojan war is included in many important works of Greek literature, most notably Homer’s Iliad which relates four days in the tenth year of the decade-long siege of Troy; the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the war’s heroes. Other parts of the war are described in a cycle of epic poems, which have survived through fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets including Virgil and Ovid. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern-day Italy. The ancient Greeks believed that Troy was located near the Dardanelles and that the Trojan War was a historical event of the 13th or 12th century BC, however by the mid-19th century, both the war and the city were widely seen as mythological. Then In 1868, Frank Calvert convinced the German archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann that Troy was a real city at what is now Hissarlik in Turkey.

Whether there is any historical reality behind the Trojan War remains an open question. Many scholars believe that there is a historical core to the tale, and the Homeric stories may be a fusion of various tales of sieges and expeditions by Mycenaean Greeks during the Bronze Age. The Trojan War may also be derived from a specific historical conflict during the 12th or 11th centuries BC. The Greek mathematician, geographer, poet, astronomer, and music theorist Eratosthenes of Cyrene, mentions the date 1194–1184 BC.

William Shakespeare

Often referred to England’s national poet, the “Bard of Avon”, and widely regarded as the world’s pre-eminent dramatist and greatest writer in the English language. The Prolific English poet and playwright William Shakespeare was believed to have been born on ths day 23rd April1564 (based on his baptism 26 April 1564). Shakespeare was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Sometime between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men.

His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. The first recorded works of Shakespeare include Richard III and the three parts of Henry VI, written in the early 1590s during a vogue for historical drama. He then wrote Titus Andronicus, The Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Two Noble Kinsmen and Cardenio. During the mid-1590s Shakespeare wrote his most acclaimed comedies A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a witty mixture of romance, fairy magic, and comic lowlife scenes. The equally romantic Merchant of Venice, which contains a portrayal of the vengeful Jewish moneylender Shylock, which reflects Elizabethan views but may appear derogatory to modern audiences. He also wrote the Plays Much Ado About Nothing which is full of wit and wordplay, As You Like Which is set in a charming rural setting of and Twelfth Night which contains lively merrymaking. Shakespeare also infused many of his works with prose comedy

Next Shakespeare wrote Richard II, which was written almost entirely in verse, He then wrote Henry IV, parts 1 and 2, and Henry V. He also wrote two tragedies: Romeo and Juliet, the famous romantic tragedy of sexually charged adolescence, love, and death and Julius Caesar—based on Sir Thomas North’s 1579 translation of Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. During the early 17th century, Shakespeare wrote the so-called “problem plays” such as Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida, and All’s Well That Ends Well, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra and Coriolanus. In his final period, Shakespeare turned to romance or tragicomedy and completed three more major plays: Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, as well as the collaboration, Pericles, Prince of Tyre. Less bleak than the tragedies, these four plays are graver in tone than the comedies of the 1590s, but they end with reconciliation and the forgiveness of potentially tragic errors.

His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. He was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon. Shakespeare was probably educated at the King’s New School in Stratford, a free school chartered in 1553, about a quarter-mile (400 m) from his home. Grammar schools varied in quality during the Elizabethan era, but grammar school curricula were largely similar: the basic Latin text was standardised by royal decree. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, although there is some speculation that he was also married to his childhood sweetheart Anne Whately, who may have been The Dark Lady referred to in the sonnets. He had three children with Hathaway: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613 at age 49.

Few records of Shakespeare’s private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. In 1623, two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare’s.

During his life Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the 19th century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare’s genius, and the Victorians worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called “bardolatry”. In the 20th century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. Sadly though Shakespeare passed away on 23rd April 1616 but he left behnd an endurng legacy and his books Sonnets & plays remain highly popular today and are constantly studied, performed, and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world and have been adapted for film and Television numerous times and remain as popular today as they’ve always been.

Mark Twain

American Author Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens)Twain sadly passed away April 21 1910. he was Born November 30, in 1835. he is Most noted for his novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “the Great American Novel.” Mark Twain was born during a visit by Halley’s Comet, and he predicted that he would “go out with it” as well. he grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

At first He apprenticed with a printer. Where He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion’s newspaper. After toiling as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River. He then turned to journalism and while a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His travelogues were also well-received. Twain had found his calling.

Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evolved into a chronicler of the vanities, hypocrisies and murderous acts of mankind. At mid-career, with Huckleberry Finn, he combined rich humour, sturdy narrative and social criticism. Twain was a master at rendering colloquial speech which helped to create and popularize a distinctive American literature built on American themes and language. Many of Twain’s works have been suppressed at times for various reasons. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has repeatedly been restricted in American high schools, for its frequent use of words now considered racist which were in common usage in the pre-Civil War period in which the novel was set. Although He achieved great success as a writer and public speaker, with his wit and satire earning him praise from presidents, artists, industrialists, European royalty, critics and peers alike, he lacked financial acumen, and although he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he squandered it on various ventures,and was often forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain’s first important work, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” was first published in the New York Saturday Press on November 18, 1865. Next, he was commissioned to write letters about his travel experiences, chronicling his experiences with his burlesque humour. The first journey he took was to ride the steamer Ajax in its maiden voyage to Hawaii. These humorous letters proved the genesis to his work with the San Francisco Alta California newspaper, which designated him a traveling correspondent for a trip from San Francisco to New York City via the Panama isthmus. This trip resulted in The Innocents Abroad or The New Pilgrims’ Progress. This is a record of a pleasure trip, written as If it were a record of a solemn scientific expedition having the gravity, profundity, and impressive incomprehensibility which are so proper to works of that kind.

In 1872, Twain published a second piece of travel literature, Roughing It, as a semi-sequel to Innocents. This was a semi-autobiographical account of Twain’s journey to Nevada and his subsequent life in the American West. The book lampoons American and Western society in the same way that Innocents critiqued the various countries of Europe and the Middle East. Twain’s next work. Entitled The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today was not a travel piece, as his previous two books had been, it focused more on the events of the day in American society, and was his first attempt at writing a novel. The book is also notable because it is Twain’s only collaboration; it was written with his neighbor Charles Dudley Warner. Twain’s next two works drew on his experiences on the Mississippi River. Old Times on the Mississippi, was a series of sketches published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1875, which featured Twain’s disillusionment with Romanticism. It eventually became the starting point for Life on the Mississippi.

Twain’s next major publication was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, which drew on his youth in Hannibal. Modelled on Twain as a child, with traces of two schoolmates, John Briggs and Will Bowen. The book also introduced Huckleberry Finn, based on Twain’s boyhood friend Tom Blankenship. His next book, The Prince and the Pauper, was not as well received. It Tells the story of two boys born on the same day who are physically identical, who switch places. Pauper was Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction, and blame for its shortcomings is usually put on Twain for having not been experienced enough in English society, and also on the fact that it was produced after a massive hit. Twain’s next major published work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, solidified him as a noteworthy American writer. Some have called it the first Great American Novel, and the book has become required reading in many schools throughout the United States. Huckleberry Finn was an offshoot from Tom Sawyer and had a more serious tone than its predecessor. The main premise behind Huckleberry Finn is the young boy’s belief in the right thing to do, even though most believed that it was wrong.

Near the completion of Huckleberry Finn, Twain wrote Life on the Mississippi, this recounts Twain’s memories and new experiences after a 22-year absence from the Mississippi. Twain’s last work was his autobiography, which he dictated and thought would be most entertaining if he went off on whims and tangents in non-chronological order. Some archivists and compilers have rearranged the biography into more conventional forms, thereby eliminating some of Twain’s humour and the flow of the book. Mark Twains novels remain popular and this  enduring popularity has helped him become one of very few authors publishing new best-selling volumes in all 3 of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer have also both been adapted for film and Television.

Charlotte Brontë

English novelist and poet Charlotte Brontë was born 21 April 1816 in Thornton, Yorkshire in 1816, she was te third of six children, and was the eldest of the three Brontë sisters to survive into adulthood. In August 1824, Charlotte was sent with three of her sisters, Emily, Maria, and Elizabeth, to the Clergy Daughters’ School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire (Charlotte later used the school as the basis for the fictional Lowood School in Jane Eyre).

She and the other surviving children — Branwell, Emily, and Anne – created their own literary fictional worlds, and began chronicling the lives and struggles of the inhabitants of these imaginary kingdoms. Charlotte and Branwell wrote Byronic stories about their imagined country (“Angria”) and Emily and Anne wrote articles and poems about theirs (“Gondal”). The sagas which they created were elaborate and convoluted (and still exist in partial manuscripts) and provided them with an obsessive interest during childhood and early adolescence, which prepared them for their literary vocations in adulthood.

Charlotte continued her education at Roe Head, Mirfield, from 1831 to 32, where she met her lifelong friends and correspondents, Ellen Nussey and Mary Taylor. During this period, she wrote her novella The Green Dwarf (1833) under the name of Wellesley. Charlotte returned to Roe Head as a teacher from 1835 to 1838. In 1839, she took up the first of many positions as governess to various families in Yorkshire, a career she pursued until 1841.

In 1842 Charlotte and Emily travelled to Brussels to enroll in a boarding school run by Constantin Heger In return for board and tuition, Charlotte taught English and Emily taught music. However their time at the boarding school was cut short when Elizabeth Branwell, their aunt  joined the family after their mother died. Charlotte returned alone to Brussels in January 1843 to take up a teaching post at the boarding school but returned to Haworth in January 1844 and later used her time at the boarding school as the inspiration for some experiences in The Professor and Villette.

In May 1846, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne self-financed the publication of a joint collection of poetry under the assumed names of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell. Charlotte’s first manuscript, called The Professor, did not secure a publisher, although she was heartened by an encouraging response she received from Smith, Elder & Co of Cornhill, who expressed an interest in any longer works which “Currer Bell” might wish to send. Charlotte responded by finishing and sending a second manuscript in August 1847, and six weeks later this second manuscript (titled Jane Eyre: An Autobiography) was published under the pen name Currer Bell. Jane Eyre became a success, and received favourable reviews. Jane Eyre was followed by the subsequent publication of the first novels by Charlotte’s sisters: Emily’s Wuthering Heights and Anne’s Agnes Grey.

In June 1854, Charlotte married Arthur Bell Nicholls, her father’s curate and, in the opinion of many scholars, the model for several of her literary characters such as Jane Eyre’s Edward Rochester and St. John Rivers. She became pregnant soon after the marriage. Her health declined rapidly during this time, and according to Gaskell, her earliest biographer, she was attacked by “sensations of perpetual nausea and ever-recurring faintness.”

Sadly though Charlotte died, along with her unborn child, on 31 March 1855, at the young age of 38. Her death certificate gives the cause of death as phthisis (tuberculosis), but many biographers suggest she may have died from dehydration and malnourishment, caused by excessive vomiting from severe morning sickness or hyperemesis gravidarum. There is also evidence to suggest that Charlotte died from typhus she may have caught from Tabitha Ackroyd, the Bronte household’s oldest servant, who died shortly before her. Charlotte was interred in the family vault in The Church of St. Michael and All Angels, Haworth, West Yorkshire, England. Charlotte Brontë’s Her endurng popularty & legacy still lives on and all Charlotte Bronte’s novels Particularly Jane Eyre, are still as popular as ever And her novels are English literature standards and are still widely taught in many schools. Numerous Television Radio and Film adaptations have also been made of her novels.

Alistair MacLean

Scottish adventure thriller novelist Alistair Stuart MacLean (Scottish Gaelic: Alasdair MacGill-Eain; was born 21 April 1922 in Glasgow. He spent much of his childhood and youth in Daviot, ten miles south of Inverness. He was the third of four sons. He joined the Royal Navy in 1941, serving in World War II with the ranks of Ordinary Seaman, Able Seaman, and Leading Torpedo Operator. He was first assigned to PS Bournemouth Queen, a converted excursion ship fitted for anti-aircraft guns, on duty off the coasts of England and Scotland. Beginning in 1943, he served on HMS Royalist, a Dido-class light cruiser. There he saw action in 1943 in the Atlantic theatre, on two Arctic convoys and escorting carrier groups in operations against Tirpitz and other targets off the Norwegian coast.

In 1944 he and the ship served in the Mediterranean theatre, as part of the invasion of southern France and in helping to sink blockade runners off Crete and bombard Milos in the Aegean. During this time MacLean may have been injured in a gunnery practice accident.In 1945, in the Far East theatre, MacLean and Royalist saw action escorting carrier groups in operations against Japanese targets in Burma, Malaya, and Sumatra. (MacLean’s late-in-life claims that he was captured by the Japanese and tortured have been dismissed by both his son and his biographer as drunken ravings. After the Japanese surrender, Royalist helped evacuate liberated POWs from Changi Prison in Singapore.

MacLean was released from the Royal Navy in 1946. He then studied English at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1953, and then worked as a school teacher in Rutherglen. While a university student, MacLean began writing short stories for extra income, winning a competition in 1954 with the maritime story “Dileas”. The publishing company Collins asked him for a novel and he responded with HMS Ulysses, based on his own war experiences, as well as credited insight from his brother Ian, a Master Mariner. The novel was a great success and MacLean was soon able to devote himself entirely to writing war stories, spy stories and other adventures.

In the early 1960s, Alistair MacLean published two novels under the pseudonym “Ian Stuart” in order to prove that the popularity of his books was due to their content rather than his name on the cover. They sold well, but MacLean made no attempt to change his writing style and his fans may easily have recognized him behind the Scottish pseudonym. He wrote many popular thrillers and adventure stories, the best known being The Guns of Navarone, Ice Station Zebra, and Where Eagles Dare MacLean’s books eventually sold so well that he moved to Switzerland as a tax exile. Between 1963–1966, he took a hiatus from writing to run a hotel business in England. MacLean was also awarded a Doctor of Letters by the University of Glasgow in 1983.

Sadly MacLean’s later books were not as well received as the earlier publications and, in an attempt to keep his stories in keeping with the time, he sometimes lapsed into overly improbable plots. Many of McClean’s adventure thrillers have also been made into popular films including Guns of Navrone, Ice Station Zebra and Where Eagles Dare. Unfortunately McClean struggled constantly with alcoholism, which eventually brought about his death in Munich on 2 February 1987. He is buried a few yards from Richard Burton in Céligny, Switzerland. He was married twice and had two sons by his first wife, as well as an adopted third son.

Sebastian Faulks CBE

British novelist, journalist and broadcaster Sebastian Charles Faulks CBE was born 20 April 1953 in Donnington, Berkshire. His father was a decorated soldier (he won the Military Cross), who later became a solicitor and judge. His brother Edward Faulks, Baron Faulks QC, a barrister, became a Conservative Government Minister in January 2014 in the Ministry of Justice.He was educated at Elstree School, Reading and went on to Wellington College, Berkshire. He read English at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, of which he was made an Honorary Fellow in 2007.Whilst at Cambridge he participated in University Challenge, in which Emmanuel College lost in the opening round. Faulks commented that his team were most probably hampered by a trip to the pub before the show, as recommended by the show’s producer.

After graduating, Faulks lived in France for a year. When he returned to England he worked as a teacher at a private school in Camden Town, and then as a journalist. Faulks’ first novel, A Trick of the Light, was published in 1984. He became the first literary editor of The Independent in 1986. He became deputy editor of the Independent on Sunday in 1989; in the same year he published The Girl at the Lion d’Or, the first of his historical novels set in France. Faulks is best known for his three novels set in early twentieth-century France. This was followed by Birdsong (1993), and Charlotte Gray (1998). The latter two were best-sellers, and Charlotte Gray was shortlisted for the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. In April 2003 Birdsong came 13th in the BBC’s Big Read initiative which aimed to identify Britain’s best loved novels.

In 1991 he left The Independent, and wrote for various other papers. Following the success of Birdsong Faulks quit journalism to write full-time. He has since published eight novels; including: Devil May Care a James Bond continuation novel, To mark the 2008 centenary of Ian Fleming’s birth, which was commissioned by the late author’s estate in 2006. He also wrote Human Traces (which is set in a Victorian Lunatic Asylum), a continuation of P.G. Wodehouse’s Jeeves and the Wedding Bells (2013) and Engleby, which is Set in Cambridge in the 1970s, it is narrated by Cambridge University fresher Mike Engleby who is implicated when a fellow student disappears. He next wrote A Week in December (2009) which takes place, in the seven days leading up to Christmas in December 2007 and focuses on the lives of a varied cast of characters living in London during the Banking Crisis which also features reality television and Islamic Militancy. Among his His latest novels are A Possible Life and Where my Heart used to beat.

Faulks was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1993 he won the 1994 British Book Awards Author of the Year, the 1998 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction (shortlist) for Charlotte Gray. In 2002 he was Appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE), “For services to Literature” and in 2009 he won the British Book Awards Popular Fiction Award for Devil May Care. In 2001 Charlotte Gray was made into a film starring Cate Blanchett and directed by Gillian Armstrong. In 2010 a stage version of Birdsong, adapted by Rachel Wagstaff (who had previously adapted The Girl at the Lion d’Or for radio) and directed by Trevor Nunn, opened at the Comedy Theatre in London; and was subsequently made into a two-part BBC TV serial in 2012, written by Abi Morgan, directed by Philip Martin and starring Eddie Redmayne.

Faulks also appears regularly on British TV and radio. He has been a regular team captain on BBC Radio 4’s literary quiz The Write Stuff since 1998 The quiz involves the panellists each week writing a pastiche of the work of a selected author, Faulks has published a collection of his efforts as a book, Pistache (2006). In 2011 Faulks presented a four-part BBC Two series called Faulks on Fiction, looking at the British novel and its characters and also wrote a series tie-in book of the same name.