Gene Roddenberry

Best known for creating the American science fiction series Star Trek, the American television screenwriter, producer and futurist”Gene” Roddenberry was born August 19th, 1921 in El Paso, Texas. He grew up in Los Angeles, California where his father worked as a police officer. During World War II, His father flew 89 combat missions in the United States Army Air Forces and once he was demobbed he worked as a commercial pilot after the war and also as a Freelance Writer, writing scripts for Highway Patrol, Have Gun–Will Travel, and other series, before creating and producing his own television program, The Lieutenant.

In 1964 Gene Roddenberry created Star Trek, which premiered in 1966 and aired for three seasons on the television network NBC. It followed the interstellar adventures of Captain James T Kirk (William Shatner) and his crew aboard the starship USS Enterprise, a space exploration vessel, built by the interstellar federal republic United Federation of Planets in the twenty-third century. The Star Trek canon of the franchise includes The Original Series, an animated series, four spin-off television series, its film franchise and an upcoming television series scheduled to debut in 2017.

Roddenberry took his inspiration for Star Trek from the Horatio Hornblower novels, Gulliver’s Travels, and by works of western genre such as the television series Wagon Train. These adventures continued in the short-lived Star Trek: The Animated Series and six feature films. Numerous spin-off television series have been produced including: Star Trek: The Next Generation, which followed the crew of a new starship Enterprise set a century after the original series; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager set alongside the The Next Generation; and Star Trek: Enterprise, this series is set before the original series in the early days of human interstellar travel. The adventures of The Next Generation crew continued in four additional feature films.

Syndication of the original Star Trek series led to increasing popularity, and Roddenberry continued to create, produce, and consult on Star Trek films and the television series, Star Trek: The Next Generation until his death on 24 October 1991 . Roddenberry received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and he was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Hall of Fame. Years after his death, Roddenberry was one of the first humans to have his ashes “buried” in outer space. The fictional Star Trek universe Roddenberry created has spanned over four decades, producing numerous television series and many films – Including the Wrath of Kahn, The Search For Spock, The Voyage Home, Undiscovered Country, Insurrection, Star Trek Generations

After a gap It was revived by director JJ Abrahams in 2009 and the film franchise underwent a “reboot” set in an alternate timeline, or “Kelvin Timeline. This stars Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana and Simon Pegg as younger versions of the original 1960’s characters. Leonard Nimoy, who starred as Spock in the original series also makes a Cameo appearance as himself in one of the films, and Benedict Cumberbatch stars as a younger version of Kahn, who was originally portrayed by Ricardo Montalban. It was followed by two sequels Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) and, Star Trek Beyond (2016), which was released to coincide with the franchise’s 50th anniversary. Plus there is also A new Star Trek TV series, entitled Star Trek: Discovery, which is available on Netflix. The popularity of the Star Trek universe and films has also inspired the gentle parody/homage film Galaxy Quest (1999), as well as many books, video games and fan films set in the various “eras” of the Star Trek universe. The Star Trek universe Roddenberry created has left a long lasting legacy, and continues to be very popular.

Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance

I would like to see The Netflix Television Series Dark : crystal Age of Resistance. This 10-episode fantasy adventure series serves as a prequel to the 1982 fantasy film The Dark Crystal. It takes place many years before the events of the first film on the world of Thra and follows the exciting and often dangerous adventures of three gelflings Rian, Brea and Deet who set off on an epic and perilous quest after they learn the horrifying secret that lies behind the power which sustains and continually replenishes the evil lizard like Skelsis.

The original Dark Crystal takes place A thousand years ago where an all powerful magical Crystal is accidentally shattered. This allows two new races to appear: the malevolent Skeksis,and the kindly urRu, more commonly known as the Mystics. They live on thra with many others including the Gelflings the diminutive poddlings, aquatic Nebri, dog like Fizzgigs and long legged land striders which look like a cross between rabbits and giraffes and are used by the Gelflings for travelling great distances.

It features a young Gelfling named Jen who is adopted by the urRu after his clan is killed. He is told by his urRu Master that he must heal the Dark Crystal. To do this he must first locate a Shard being kept by the astronomer Aughra before the planet’s three suns align, Or the Skeksis will rule forever. Jen’s Master then dies. Meanwhile, the Skeksis’ Emperor also dies and a duel ensues between the Skeksis’ Chamberlain and the Master of their large crab-like Garthim. The Garthim-Master wins and the Chamberlain is subsequently exiled, Unfortunately he also learns of Jen’s quest and dispatches giant crustacean like Garthim to capture Jen

Meanwhile Jen reaches Aughra’s home, which contains an enormous orrery which she uses to predict future events and the motions of the heavens. Aughra tells Jen of the upcoming Great Conjunction, the alignment of the three suns. She also has a box full of shards one of which Jen must choose. Unfortunately they are attacked by the Garthim who destroy Aughra’s home, taking her prisoner as Jen flees.

Meanwhile after Hearing the call of the Crystal, the urRu leave their valley to travel to the Skeksis’ Castle. Elsewhere On his journey through the swamp, Jen meets Kira, another surviving Gelfling who can communicate with animals. They discover that they have a telepathic connection, which Kira calls “dreamfasting”. Jen also meets the Podlings, who rescued and raised Kira after the death of her parents. Sadly the Garthim raid the Podling village and Jen, Kira, and Kira’s pet Fizzgig are forced to flee. Unfortunately They run into the exiled Skeksis Chamberlain, who tries to gain their trust and persuade them to return to the Skeksis castle with him. After another narrow escape Jen and Kira discover a ruined Gelfling city with ancient writing describing a prophecy: ”

“When single shines the triple sun, what was sundered and undone shall be whole. The two made one by Gelfling hand or else by none.”

Riding on Landstriders, Jen and Kira arrive at the Skeksis’ Castle with the Shard and try to rescue the Podlings that were taken by the Garthim from Kira’s village the previous night. Kira, Jen, and Fizzgig then try to gain access to the Skeksis castle however the exiled Skeksis chamberlain captures Kira and takes her inside and The Garthim-Master reinstates him to his former position. The Skeksis’ Scientist then tries to drain Kira’s life essence for the Garthim-Master to drink. However Aughra, who is also imprisoned in the Scientist’s laboratory, assists Kira and they escape and rescue Fizzgig. Meanwhile The three suns begin to align as Jen and Kira reach the Crystal Chamber, and the Skeksis gather for the ritual that will grant them immortality unless Jen and Kira use the shard to heal the Dark crystal….

E. Nesbit

English author and poet Edith Nesbit was born 15th August 1858. She wrote or collaborated on over 60 books of fiction for children, several of which have been adapted for film and television. She was also a political activist and co founoded the Fabian Society, a precursor to the modern Labour Party.Nesbit published approximately 40 books for children, including novels, collections of stories and picture books. Collaborating with others, she published almost as many more. Nesbit was “the first modern writer for children”and unlike authors such asLewis Carroll, George MacDonald and Kenneth Grahame, who turned away from tough truths, Nesbit dealt with things-as-they-are, previously the province of adult novels.” Nesbit is also credited with having invented the children’s adventure story. Noël Coward was a great admirer of hers and, in a letter to an early biographer Noel Streatfeild, wrote “she had an economy of phrase, and an unparalleled talent for evoking hot summer days in the English countryside.”

Among Nesbit’s best-known books are The Story of the Treasure Seekers (1898) and The Railway Children. This concerns a family who move to “Three Chimneys”, a house near the railway, after the father, who works at the Foreign office, is imprisoned after being falsely accused of spying. The children befriend an Old Gentleman who regularly takes the 9:15 train near their home; he is eventually able to help prove their father’s innocence, and the family is reunited. The family also take care of a Russian exile, Mr Szczepansky, who came to England looking for his family (later located) and Jim, the grandson of the Old Gentleman, who suffers a broken leg in a tunnel. The theme of an innocent man being falsely imprisoned for espionage and finally vindicated might have been influenced by the Dreyfus Affair, which was a prominent worldwide news item a few years before the book was written. And the Russian exile, persecuted by the Tsars for writing “a beautiful book about poor people and how to help them” and subsequently helped by the children, was most likely an amalgam of the real-life dissidents Sergius Stepniak and Peter Kropotkin who were both friends of the author.

The Railway Children was also adapted into 1970 British drama film based on the novel by E. Nesbit. The film was directed by Lionel Jeffries, and stars Dinah Sheridan, Jenny Agutter (who had earlier featured in the successful BBC’s 1968 dramatisation of the novel), Sally Thomsett and Bernard Cribbins in leading roles. The film was released to cinemas in the United Kingdom on 21 December 1970. The film rights were bought by Lionel Jeffries. It was his directorial debut, and he was also responsible for writing the screenplay for the film. The Railway Children turned out to be a critical success, both at the time of its release and in later years. It has gone on to gain a place in several surveys of the greatest films ever made, including surveys conducted by the British Film Institute and Total Film magazine. The Railway Children was later remade with Jenny Agutter playing the Mother of the three children.

Nesbitt also wrote The Wouldbegoods (1899), which recount stories about the Bastables, a middle class family that has fallen on relatively hard times. The Railway Children is also extremely well known. Her children’s writing also included numerous plays and collections of verse.She created an innovative body of work that combined realistic, contemporary children in real-world settings with magical objects – what would now be classed as contemporary fantasy – and adventures and sometimes travel to fantastic worlds. In doing so, she was a direct or indirect influence on many subsequent writers, including P. L. Travers (author of Mary Poppins), Edward Eager, Diana Wynne Jones and J. K. Rowling. C. S. Lewis wrote of her influence on his Narnia series and mentions the Bastable children in The Magician’s Nephew. Michael Moorcock would go on to write a series of steampunk novels with an adult Oswald Bastable (of The Treasure Seekers) as the lead character. Nesbit also wrote books for adults, including eleven novels, short stories and four collections of horror stories. Edith Nesbit sadly passed away on 4 May 1924, but has left a long lasting legacy in the form of some great novels and Poems which continue to remain popular. Her novel The Railway Children has also been adapted for film and Television numerous times.

P. D. James OBE FRSA FRSL

English Crime Novelist P.D.James OBE, FRSA, FRSL (Phyllis Dorothy James, Baroness James of Holland Park), was born 3 August 1920 in Oxford. She was educated at the British School in Ludlow and Cambridge High School for Girls. However She had to leave school at the age of sixteen to work because her family did not have much money and her father did not believe in higher education for girls. She worked in a tax office for three years and later found a job as an assistant stage manager for a theatre group. In 1941, she married Ernest Connor Bantry White, an army doctor. They had two daughters, Clare and Jane.When White returned from World War II, he was experiencing mental illness, and James was forced to provide for the whole family until her husband’s death in 1964. James studied hospital administration and from 1949 to 1968 worked for a hospital board in London.

She began writing in the mid-1950s. Her first novel, Cover Her Face, featuring investigator and poet Adam Dalgliesh of New Scotland Yard, (named after a teacher at Cambridge High School), was published in 1962.Many of James’s mystery novels take place against the backdrop of UK bureaucracies, such as the criminal justice system and the National Health Service, in which she worked for decades starting in the 1940s. Two years after the publication of Cover Her Face, James’s husband died, and she took a position as a civil servant within the criminal section of the Home Office. She worked in government service until her retirement in 1979. The final Dalgleish novel was The Private Patient.

In 1991, James was made a life peer as Baroness James of Holland Park and sat in the House of Lords as a Conservative. She was an Anglican and a lay patron of the Prayer Book Society. Her 2001 work, Death in Holy Orders, displays her familiarity with the inner workings of church hierarchy. Her later novels were often set in a community closed in some way, such as a publishing house or barristers’ chambers, a theological college, an island or a private clinic.

She was also guest editor of BBC Radio 4’s Today programme in December 2009 and conducted an interview with the Director General of the BBC, Mark Thompson, in which she seemed critical of some of his decisions. Regular Today presenter Evan Davis commented that “She shouldn’t be guest editing; she should be permanently presenting the programme. In 2008, she was inducted into the International Crime Writing Hall of Fame at the inaugural ITV3 Crime Thriller Awards. James was also one of 200 public figures who were signatories to a letter opposing Scottish independence during the run up to the referendum. P.D.James sadly died at her home in Oxford on 27 November 2014, aged 94. She is survived by her two daughters, Clare and Jane, five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Many of James’s mystery novels have also been adapted for television Featuring Roy Marsden as Adam Dalgliesh including Death in Holy Orders in 2003, and The Murder Room in 2004, both as one-off dramas starring Martin Shaw as Dalgliesh. Her novel The Children of Men (1992) was the basis for the feature film Children of Men (2006), directed by Alfonso Cuarón and starring Clive Owen, Julianne Moore and Michael Caine.

Terry Wogan KBE DL

Veteran Radio broadcaster and television presenter Sir Michael Terence “Terry” Wogan, KBE DL was Born in Limerick. Ireland on 3 August 1938. Wogan moved to Dublin with his family at the age of 15, after his father was promoted to general manager. While living in Dublin, he attended Crescent College’s sister school, Belvedere College. He participated in amateur dramatics and discovered a love of rock and roll. After leaving Belvedere in 1956, Wogan had a brief career in the banking profession, joining the Royal Bank of Ireland. While in his twenties, he joined the national broadcaster of Ireland, RTÉ (Raidió Teilifís Éireann) as a newsreader and announcer, after seeing a newspaper advertisement inviting applicants.

Wogan conducted interviews and presented documentary features during his first two years at Raidió Teilifís Éireann, before moving to the light entertainment department as a disc jockey and host of TV quiz and variety shows such as Jackpot, a top rated quiz show on RTÉ in the 1960s. It was here that he developed his signature catchphrase, based on his name: “Wo’gwan.”[10] When the show was dropped by RTÉ TV in 1967, Wogan approached the BBC for extra work. He began working for BBC Radio, initially ‘down the line’ from London, first broadcasting on the Light Programme on Tuesday 27 September 1966. He presented the Tuesday edition of Late Night Extra for two years on BBC Radio 1, commuting weekly from Dublin to London. After covering Jimmy Young’s mid-morning show throughout July 1969, he was offered a regular afternoon slot between 3 and 5.

In April 1972, he took over the breakfast show on BBC Radio 2, swapping places with John Dunn, who briefly hosted the afternoon show. Wogan enjoyed unprecedented popularity, achieving audiences of up to 7.9 million. His seemingly ubiquitous presence across the media meant that he frequently became the butt of jokes by comedians of the time, among them The Goodies and The Barron Knights. He was capable of self-parody too, releasing a vocal version of the song “The Floral Dance” in 1978, by popular request from listeners who enjoyed hearing him sing over the instrumental hit by the Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band. His version reached number 21 in the UK Singles Chart. A follow-up single, entitled “Me and the Elephant”, and an eponymous album were also released, but did not chart. In December 1984, Wogan left his breakfast show to pursue a full-time career in television and was replaced by Ken Bruce. His first chat show Wogan’s World, was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 from 6 June 1974 to 21 September 1975.

In January 1993, he returned to BBC Radio 2 to present the breakfast show, then called Wake Up to Wogan. Which included rambling, esoteric banter and was highly interactive with much of the entertainment coming from letters and emails sent in by listeners (many of whom adopt punning pseudonyms, such as Edina Cloud, Lucy Lastic, Sly Stunnion, Roland Butter, Lucy Quipment, Anne Kersaway, Peregrine Trousers, Alf Hartigan, Mick Sturbs, Hellen Bach and “Tess Tickles”. Wogan is also widely credited with launching the career of singer Katie Melua after he repeatedly played her debut single, “The Closest Thing to Crazy”, in late 2003 Which she performed on Children in Need in 2005.

He worked for the BBC in Great Britain for most of his career. Before he retired from his BBC Radio 2 weekday breakfast programme Wake Up to Wogan in 2009, it had eight million regular listeners, making him the most listened-to radio broadcaster in Europe. Wogan began his career on the Irish national broadcaster Raidió Teilifís Éireann where he presented shows such as Jackpot in the 1960s and became a leading media personality in the UK from the late 1960s often being referred to as a “national treasure”.In addition to his weekday radio show, he was known in the United Kingdom for his work for television, including the BBC One chat show Wogan, presenting Children in Need, the game show Blankety Blank and Come Dancing and as the BBC’s commentator for the Eurovision Song Contest from 1971 to 2008.

Wogan’s radio show included running jokes involving Wogan’s newsreader colleagues Alan Dedicoat (nicknamed ‘Deadly’ after the spoonerism ‘Deadly Alancoat’), Fran Godfrey and John Marsh (nicknamed ‘Boggy’). He also narrated a series of spoof “Janet and John” stories during the breakfast show. Which were a pastiche of children’s learn-to-read stories but are littered with humorous sexual double-entendres.Wogan’s radio show also included exchanges with “the Totty from Splotty “ – Lynn Bowles, the Welsh traffic reporter from Splott, Cardiff – which often involved reading limericks from listeners cut short after 1 or 2 lines due to risqué innuendo. On 2009, Wogan left the breakfast show with Chris Evans taking over. However Wogan returned to Radio 2 from 14 February 2010 to host Weekend Wogan, a live weekly two-hour Sunday show on Radio 2, hosted in front of a live studio audience andfeaturing live musical performance and guests, between 11.00 am and 1.00 pm and continued to host the show until November 2015 when, due to ill health, he was replaced by Richard Madeley

Part Two

From 1980 Wogan presented The BBC Televised Charity appeal Children in Need alongside Esther Rantzen and Sue Lawley. Raising money for various children’s charities and good causes and also appeared on the comedy quiz show QI in 2008 In 2008, Wogan and singer Aled Jones released a single “Little Drummer Boy/Peace on Earth” which got to number three in the UK music charts. The money raised went to BBC Children in Need. The two recorded a second Christmas single “Silver Bells” in 2009 which was also in aid of BBC Children in Need. Wogan was the main regular presenter of Children in Need for more than thirty years, his last such appearance being in 2014. In November 2015, Wogan was unable to participate in the televised Children in Need appeal for the first time in its 35-year history due to poor health and was replaced by Dermot O’Leary.

In 1971, and from 1974, until 1977, Wogan provided the BBC’s radio commentary for the Eurovision Song Contest and From 1980 until 2008, he provided the BBC’s television commentary and became known for his sardonic acerbic wit and highly cynical comments. In 1998 He co-hosted the contest with Ulrika Jonsson in Birmingham when Dana International of Israel won the contest. He also hosted Eurovision in 1973, 1975 and 1977 until 1996, 1998, and from 2003 until 2008. As well as the companion show Making Your Mind Up, in which the British public voted to decide their Eurovision entry. In recent years, the Contest has become notorious for what is widely seen as an increase in political voting, the UK’s entry has in recent years often come last despite being of better quality in favor of some really ridiculous songs.In 2008, Wogan gave up presenting Eurovision after 35 years when United Kingdom once again finished last, stating it had become predictable and was no longer a music contest (I’m not sure it ever was, it’s more of a freak show sometimes) and was replaced by Graham Norton.

Wogan’s was also famous for TV chat shows including What’s on Wogan? And Saturday Live in 1981. Wogan was then given his own chat show, Wogan, which after a trial run on a midweek evening, was recommissioned for broadcast on Saturday nights from 1982 to 1984. Between 1985 and 1992, the show became thrice-weekly on early weekday evenings. Memorable incidents in the series included the interviews with a drunk George Best and Oliver Reed, a silent Chevy Chase, a nervous Anne Bancroft who was so petrified she gave monosyllabic answers and counted to ten before descending the entrance steps to the studio, Ronnie Barker announcing his retirement on the show, and David Icke claiming to be the “Son of God”. Despite it”s success, in 1992 his talk show was replaced by the ill-fated soap Eldorado and he briefly hosted a new weekly chat strand Terry Wogan’s Friday Night in 1993. In 2006 Wogan presented Wogan Now and Then where he interviewed guests from his old chat show as well as new guests. In 2015 BBC Two launched a new compilation series, Wogan: the Best Of, featuring selected interview segments and music performances from Wogan’s past chat series, linked by new introductions from Wogan.

In 1981 Wogan set the world record for the longest successful golf putt ever televised at 33 yards at the Gleneagles golf course in a pro-celebrity TV programme on the BBC and also narrated the BBC television series Stoppit and Tidyup which was broadcast in 1987.Wogan appeared on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross four times, between 2004 and 2009 and during Top Gear, Wogan managed to become the second-slowest guest to go around the test track as the “Star in a Reasonably-Priced Car”, a Suzuki Liana.In 2010, Wogan made a cameo appearance in the second series of Being Human, and also guest-hosted Never Mind the Buzzcocks and hosted Wogan on Wodehouse for BBC Two. In 2013, Wogan appeared as a panellist on ITV game show Through the Keyhole and participated in a celebrity edition of the BBC One game show Pointless, with celebrities including Bobby Ball and Esther Rantzen, in aid of Children in Need. In 2014, Wogan appeared as a guest reporter on Bang Goes the Theory, on which he discussed old-age dementia. He also appeared on the Channel 4 game show Draw It! And guest hosted an episode of The One Show with Alex Jones.

During his long and distinguished career Wogan has received many honours. He was appointed an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1997 and elevated to an Honorary Knight Commander of the same order (KBE) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours in 2005. His knighthood was made substantive on 11 October 2005, allowing him to use the style “Sir and in 2007, he was appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. In 2007, Wogan’s home City of Limerick honoured him with the Freedom of the City. In 2004, he received an Honorary D.Litt. degree from the University of Limerick as well as a special lifetime achievement award from his native city and also received an Honorary LL.D. degree from Leicester University in 2010. Wogan was also the subject of This Is Your Life in 1978.Wogan was inducted into the Radio Academy Hall of Fame at a gala dinner held in his honour in 2009 and was announced as the Ultimate Icon of Radio 2, commemorating the station’s 40th birthday, alongside fellow nominees, The Beatles, Diana, Princess of Wales and Nelson Mandela and chose Stardust” by Nat King Cole as his iconic song of the last 40 years and Favourite song on Desert Island Discs.

Jane Austen

English novelist Jane Austen tragically died in 18th July 1817. She was born 16th December 1775 and her works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Her realism and biting social commentary have gained her historical importance among scholars and critics. Austen lived her entire life as part of a close-knit family located on the lower fringes of the English landed gentry. She was educated primarily by her father and older brothers as well as through her own reading.

The steadfast support of her family was critical to her development as a professional writer. Her artistic apprenticeship lasted from her teenage years into her thirties. During this period, she experimented with various literary forms, including the epistolary novel which she then abandoned, and wrote and extensively revised three major novels and began a fourth. From 1811 until 1816, with the release of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published posthumously in 1818, and began a third, which was eventually titled Sanditon, but died before completing it.

Austen’s works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century realism. Her plots, though fundamentally comic, highlight the dependence of women on marriage to secure social standing and economic security. Her work brought her little personal fame and only a few positive reviews during her lifetime, but the publication in 1869 of her nephew’s A Memoir of Jane Austen introduced her to a wider public, and by the 1940s she had become widely accepted in academia as a great English writer.

The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of Austen scholarship and the emergence of a Janeite fan culture. Biographical information concerning Jane Austen is “famously scarce”, according to one biographer. Only some personal and family letters remain (by one estimate only 160 out of Austen’s 3,000 letters are extant), and her sister Cassandra (to whom most of the letters were originally addressed) burned “the greater part” of the ones she kept and censored those she did not destroy. Other letters were destroyed by the heirs of Admiral Francis Austen, Jane’s brother. Most of the biographical material produced for fifty years after Austen’s death was written by her relatives and reflects the family’s biases in favour of “good quiet Aunt Jane”. Scholars have unearthed little information since. Since her death Jane Austen’s novels such as Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abbey and Emma, have all remained popular and have given rise to numerous television and film adaptations.

Doctor Who – the collection – season ten

Doctor Who: The Collection’ Season 10, is being released on Blu Ray. It features Jon Pertwee as the iconic Time Lord. All five stories over 26 episodes are newly restored for Blu-ray and the Blu Rays are packed with hours of new and existing bonus material. Episodes in season ten include:

  • The Three Doctors
  • Carnival of Monsters
  • Frontier in Space
  • Planet of the Daleks
  • The Green Death

The First episode of the classic science fiction series Doctor Who episode The three doctors was originally broadcast on 29 December 1972. It features William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton and Jon Pertwee. It begins when A powerful superluminal signal is beamed to Earth, carrying with it an unusual energy creature that cause chaos. Meanwhile Gallifrey the homeworld of the Time Lords is also under siege, with all power being drained through a black hole. Trapped and in desperation, the Time Lords summon three incarnations of Doctor Who.

Unfortunately, the First Doctor gets trapped in a time eddy, However the Second And Third Doctor are able investigate the origins of the creature and the black hole, while UNIT headquarters faces an attack by gel-like alien creatures. The black hole turns out to be a link between universes and The two Doctors Dr Tyler, Jo Grant, Sergeant Benton and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart (Nicholas Courtney) then find themselves drawn into an antimatter universe.

Once in the Anti-Matter universe They are then captured by more gel-like alien creatures and are taken to meet a legendary Time Lord named Omega. He was a former Solar Engineer for the Time Lords who created the Supernova which powers Time-Lord Civilisation but was thought by the Time-lords to have perished in the supernovA. However instead of perishing he has managed to survive in the Anti Matter Universe by using his immense scientific knowledge to create a domain for himself. Unfortunately though he is trapped in the world of Anti-Matter and is very angry that the Time Lords abandoned him to his fate. Now Omega wants to escape and get his revenge on the Time Lords. It is then up to the three Time Lords to stop Omega’s villainous plan….
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Carnival of Monsters features the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) and his travelling companion Jo Grant (Katy Manning). It starts when The TARDIS apparently materialises aboard the SS Bernice, a ship that suddenly disappeared while travelling the Indian Ocean, however things are not what they seem. Upon leaving The Doctor and Jo eventually find themselves inside the circuitry of some sort of giant machine, luckily they manage to escape, however they find themselves in mortal peril when they are chased by huge swamp-dwelling carnivores, named Drashigs.

They discover that they are trapped inside a miniscope, a device used by the showman Vorg (Leslie Dwyer) and his assistant Shirna, to shrink life forms and put them on display for entertainment, which were banned by the Time Lords. Vorg and Shirna have just arrived at the planet of Inter Minor where they are suspected of being spies and are on trial. However Two of the tribunal members, Are plotting to cause the president’s resignation. By letting the Drashigs escape from the machine and wreak havoc


Planet of the Daleks was first broadcast 7 April 1973. It starts with the Doctor (Jon Pertwee) sending a distress signal to the Time Lords after a recent confrontation with The Master. Delirious, he falls into a coma, so the Time Lords control the TARDIS remotely When it lands they find themselves on a strange Jungle planet populated by aggressive and highly poisonous plants who attack Jo as she leaves the TARDIS to explore. The plants also rapidly cover the TARDIS leaving the Doctor in grave danger. Jo, in the meantime, discovers a Thal spacecraft in the jungle with a dead pilot. Elsewhere The Thal Spaceship crew includes Taron, Rebec and Codal who find the TARDIS and rescue the nearly asphyxiated Doctor and explain that they are from the planet Skaro. The Doctor learns that his old enemies The Daleks are also on the planet and he is captured and taken to the Dalek base for interrogation.

Meanwhile, Jo is found by an invisible local named Wester who treats her wound and explains that she is on the planet Spiridon and that his people were invaded by the Daleks who released deadly bacteria which killed off most of the population and the remains of his people are trying to fight back against the Daleks, who landed on Spiridon hoping to find out the secret of the Spiridon’s invisibility and reproduce it for their own evil use. He informs Jo that the Doctor and Codal have been captured and taken to the Dalek base. Jo is determined to try to free them.

The Thals meanwhile learn that there is an army of at least 10,000 Daleks in suspended Animation hidden somewhere on Spiridon, so Wester, the Third Doctor, Jo Grant, and the small group of Thals set on a dangerous mission to find the Dalek army and stop it from being revived by sabotaging the Dalek operation. The group find themselves fleeing down the corridors with the Daleks pursuing them while trying to figure out a way to keep the Dalek army from reviving. Elsewhere The Dalek Supreme arrives on Spiridon to oversee the final stages in the revival of the Dalek Army. Meanwhile The Doctor Rebec, Taron and Codal face a race against time trying to stop the Dalek army from being revived.


the Classic six part 1973 Doctor Who episode The Green Death, features The Doctor (Jon Pertwee) joins Jo Grant(Katy Manning) and The Brigadier (Nicholas Courtney) at U.N.I.T. to investigate a series of unexplained deaths and a strange green glow at a coal mine in South Wales. Their investigation leads to a multi-national petrochemical company named Global Chemicals, Which is run by a Super computer called The Boss, that seems to have a rather sinister hold on the the Managing Director Stephens (Jerome Willis), who is strangely reluctant to co-operate.

He informs the Doctor that Global Chemicals are working on a renewable and more powerful energy source to replace Petrol. However he fails to mention that the process is also creating large amounts of hazardous toxic waste as a by-product which Global Chemicals are quietly dumping down a disused mine shaft without telling anyone.

Elsewhere a dashing young environmentalist Professor has been protesting against the ecological damage and pollution caused by Global Chemicals after finding some rather alarming evidence in the soil. His suspicions are later proved correct when Jo and The Doctor discover that the hazardous toxic waste is having an alarming effect on the insects which are living underground as larvae. To make matters worse Jo and The Doctor find themselves trapped underground with the insect larvae, when the roof caves in on one of the unsafe tunnels which they are investigating and find themselves in mortal peril from giant mutant killer maggots which are gradually making their way to the surface before metamorphosing into highly aggressive adults….
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Brand new bonus features, in the Blu Ray disc set also includes:
• OPTIONAL UPDATED EFFECTS AND 5.1 SURROUND SOUND For Planet Of The Daleks
• DOCTOR WHO AND THE THIRD MAN A new feature-length documentary covering the Pertwee era
• KEEPING UP WITH THE JONES’ Katy Manning and Stewart Bevan return to Wales
• THE GREEN DEATH 1973 OMNIBUS REPEAT Available for the first time
• And more