Billy Bass Nelson

Funkadelic U.S musician William “Billy Bass” Nelson was born January 28, 1951 in Plainfield, New Jersey and as a teenager worked at George Clinton’s barbershop, sweeping the floor and singing and dancing for the customers. Clinton was a member of the doo wop vocal group The Parliaments, who scored a nationwide hit in 1967 with the song “(I Wanna) Testify”. Clinton put together a backing band as musical support for a tour and recruited Nelson, originally as guitarist. Nelson later switched to bass when his good friend Eddie Hazel joined as lead guitarist. The backing band was originally unnamed, but Nelson later coined the name “Funkadelic” to reflect the style (funk) and connect it with the then-burgeoning psychedelic music scene.

By 1970, Funkadelic was a full band consisting of Nelson, Hazel, drummer Tiki Fulwood, guitarist Tawl Ross, and keyboardist Mickey Atkins (later replaced by Bernie Worrell). Since 1967 the band had been billed as the musical backing for The Parliaments. Due to legal problems, in the early 1970s Clinton had temporarily lost the rights to the name “The Parliaments” and instead signed the entire ensemble to Westbound Records under the name Funkadelic. Nelson was a prominent contributor to the first three Funkadelic albums, Funkadelic (1970), Free Your Mind… and Your Ass Will Follow (1970), and Maggot Brain (1971).

Nelson left the group in late 1971 after a financial dispute with George Clinton. Nelson and Hazel next performed with The Temptations. Nelson rejoined Funkadelic briefly in the studio in 1975, playing on the track “Better By the Pound” on the Funkadelic album Let’s Take It To The Stage. Nelson later played with The Commodores, Chairmen of the Board, Fishbone, Jermaine Jackson, Parlet, Lionel Richie, Smokey Robinson, and Lenny Williams.

By the early 1990s, Nelson had reunited with Eddie Hazel, Jerome Brailey, Gregg Fitz and Wilbur Harris and others in a new rendition of Funkadelic, “The New Funkadelic” until Eddie Hazel died in 1992. He also enjoyed a surge of name-checking by such legendary bassists as John Norwood Fisher (of Fishbone) and Flea (of the Red Hot Chili Peppers), while his early Funkadelic work was being sampled often by hip hop artists. Joining with some other P-Funk alumni, in 1994 Nelson released the album Out of the Dark under the name O.G. Funk. In 1994, Nelson rejoined Parliament-Funkadelic.

In March 1997, Michael “Clip” Payne debuted the 420 Funk Mob at two sold-out shows at New York City’s Tramps. The band featured fellow P-Funk members Michael Hampton, Lige Curry, Gabe Gonzalez, Ronald “Stozo” Edwards, and Greg Fitz. Nelson was the 420 Funk Mob’s first “Special Guest”. He was also inducted into the Rock and Roll hall of fame in 1997 with fifteen other members of Parliament-Funkadelic.

He continued to make appearances with the 420 Funk Mob on and off through 2006 until he left the Parliament-Funkadelic camp. He appears on the 420 Funk Mob’s Live on the Off Days CD and in their promotional video “What Time Is It?” from 2005. In 2011, he rejoined Parliament-Funkadelic after the death of the band’s lead singer, Garry Snider, playing guitar and bass until 2012. In 2014 he formed The Funkadelic Experience and as of 2015 continues to tour Europe and the United States.

Nick Mason(Pink Floyd)

Nick Mason the drummer from Prgressive Rock band Pink Floyd was born 27 January 1944. Pink Floyd were founded in 1965 and originally consisted of students Roger Waters, Nick Mason,Richard Wright, and Syd Barrett. They first became popular playing in London’s underground music scene in the late 1960s. Under Barrett’s leadership they released two charting singles, “Arnold Layne” and “See Emily Play”, and a successful début album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn .In 1968 Syd Barratt departed from the group due to his deteriorating mental health & Gilmour joined Pink Floyd as the fifth member several months prior to this. Following the loss of their principal songwriter, Pink Floyd bassist and vocalist Roger Waters became the band’s lyricist and conceptual leader, with Gilmour assuming lead guitar, taking on most of the band’s music composition, and sharing lead vocals. With this line-up Pink Floyd achieved worldwide critical and commercial success with their progressive and psychedelic rock music, which used philosophical lyrics, sonic experimentation, innovative album art, and elaborate live shows. and release of many concept albums such as The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, Animals and The Wall..

Pink Floyd ranked number 51 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of “The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time”, with David Gilmour ranking 14th in the greatest guitarists list. Largely due to the success of their albums the band was ranked No. 3 in Colin Larkin’s the ‘Top 50 Artists Of All Time’. Numerous artists have been influenced by Pink Floyd’s work: David Bowie has called Syd Barrett a major inspiration, The Edge (U2) also bought his first delay pedal after hearing the opening to Animals; and the Pet Shop Boys paid homage to The Wall during a performance in Boston; Marillion guitarist Steve Rothery has also cited Wish You Were Here as a major inspiration; and many other bands, including the Foo Fighters, Dream Theater, My Chemical Romance, Porcupine Tree, The Mars Volta, The La’s, Queen, Oasis, Iron Maiden, Stone Temple Pilots, Coheed and Cambria, Tool, Queensryche, 30 Seconds to Mars, Scissor Sisters, Rush, Radiohead, Gorillaz, Mudvayne, Nine Inch Nails, Korn, Primus and the Smashing Pumpkins, have all been influenced by them.

Pink Floyd have also won multiple awards including “Best Engineered Non-Classical Album” Grammy in 1980 for The Wall and BAFTAs award for ‘Best Original Song’ (awarded to Waters) and ‘Best Sound’ in 1982 for the The Wall film. A Grammy came to them in 1995 for “Rock Instrumental Performance” on “Marooned”. In 2008 Pink Floyd were awarded the Polar Music Prize for their contribution to contemporary music; Waters and Mason accepted the prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on 17 January 1996, the UK Music Hall of Fame on 16 November 2005 and the Hit Parade Hall of Fame in 2010, and were also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. They have continued to enjoy worldwide success and are one of the most commercially successful and influential rock music groups of all time

Gillian Gilbert (New Order)

Gillian Gilbert, the synthesiser/keyboard player with New Order was born 27January 1961. New Order were formed by ex-members of Joy Division who were formed in 1976 in Salford, Greater Manchester. Originally named Warsaw, the band primarily consisted of Ian Curtis (vocals and occasional guitar), Bernard Sumner (guitar and keyboards), Peter Hook (bass guitar and backing vocals) and Stephen Morris (drums and percussion). They evolved from their initial punk rock influences to develop a sound and style that pioneered the post-punk movement of the late 1970s. They self-released their debut EP, An Ideal for Living in 1978 and an album, Unknown Pleasures, in 1979 which drew critical acclaim from the British press. Despite the band’s growing success, vocalist Ian Curtis was beset with depression and personal difficulties, including a dissolving marriage and his diagnosis of epilepsy and found it increasingly difficult to perform at live concerts, and often having seizures during performances. On the eve of the band’s first American tour in May 1980, Curtis committed suicide. Joy Division’s posthumously released second album, Closer (1980), and the single “Love Will Tear Us Apart” became the band’s highest charting releases.

After the untimely demise of Curtis in 1980, the remaining members formed New Order, with Bernard Sumner on vocals, guitars, synthesisers), Peter Hook playing bass, synthesisers and Stephen Morris playing drums, electronic drums, synthesisers, they were also joined by Gillian Gilbert playing keyboards, guitars, synthesizers. By combining post-punk and New Wave with electronic dance music, New Order became one of the most critically acclaimed and influential bands of the 1980s. Though the band’s early years were shadowed by the legacy and basic sound of Joy Division, their experience of the early 1980s New York City club scene increased their knowledge of dance music and saw them incorporate elements of that style into their work. The band’s 1983 hit Blue Monday”, the best-selling 12-inch single of all time, is one example of how the band transformed their sound. Thanks to fantastic albums like SUBSTANCE and TECHNIQUE New Order became the flagship band for Factory Records. Their minimalist album sleeves and “non-image” (the band rarely gave interviews and were known for performing short concert sets with no encores) reflected the label’s aesthetic of doing whatever the relevant parties wanted to do, including an aversion to including singles as album tracks.

Sadly In 1993 the band broke-up amidst tension between bandmembers. However they reformed in 1998 and In 2001, Phil Cunningham (guitars, synthesisers) replaced Gilbert, who left the group due to family commitments. In 2007, Peter Hook left the band and the band broke-up again, with Sumner saying in 2009 that he no longer wishes to make music as New Order. The band reunited in 2011 without Hook, with Gilbert returning to the fold and Tom Chapman replacing Hook on bass. During the band’s career and in between lengthy breaks, band members have been involved in several solo projects, such as Sumner’s Electronic and Bad Lieutenant; Hook’s Monaco and Revenge and Gilbert’s and Morris’ The Other Two.

Mike Patton (Faith no More)

Best known as the Ex-lead singer of the metal/ experimental rock band Faith No More, the American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and actor, Michael Allan “Mike” Patton was born January 27 1968. Patton is Known for his eclectic influences and experimental projects, and has earned critical praise for his diverse vocalization.

Patton joined Faith No More in January 1989 and filled the vocal void left by the recently-fired Chuck Mosley, who moved on to the band Cement. Faith No More’s debut album The Real Thing was also released in 1989. The album reached the top ten on the charts thanks largely to MTV’s heavy rotation of the “Epic” music video (which featured Patton in a T-shirt promoting his own band Mr. Bungle).

They also had success with songs like Midlife Crisis, Falling To Pieces, From Out of Nowhere and Small Victory. Sadly though, Faith No More could not manage to match the commercial success of The Real Thing, & After three more studio albums (Angel Dust, King for a Day… Fool for a Lifetime, and Album of the Year) Faith No More officially disbanded in 1998. Since 19991 he has been running a record label named Ipecac Recordings, which He co-founded with Greg Werckman and has also sung for bands like Mr. Bungle (which preceded his involvement with FNM), Tomahawk, Fantômas, Lovage, The Dillinger Escape Plan and Peeping Tom, and also has many producer or co-producer credits with artists such as John Zorn, Sepultura, Melvins, Melt-Banana and Kool Keith.

Andrew Ridgeley (Wham!)

English singer, songwriter, and record producer.
Andrew Ridgeley Was born 26 January 1963 in Windlesham, Surrey, England. Ridgeley grew up in Bushey, Hertfordshire, and attended Bushey Meads School. His mother was a schoolteacher at Bushey Heath Primary School and his father worked for Canon. When George Michael was enrolled at the school, Ridgeley volunteered to take him under his wing.

After years of playing in various music groups, the most notable being the Executive, Michael and Ridgeley formed Wham. They then approached various record labels with a homemade tape (which took 10 minutes to record in Ridgeley’s living room) and signed with Innervision Records. The band left Innervision after the first album and signed with CBS. Wham enjoyed worldwide success from 1981 to 1986, and made their US debut appearance on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and became the only British act in the 1980s to have three No. 1 singles in both the UK and the US. Simon Napier-Bell has admitted that he fabricated a story in 1984 that Ridgeley had been hit on the nose by somebody in a nightclub in order to get publicity for Wham in British tabloid newspapers. After days of tabloid headlines, it was later revealed that the bandages on Ridgeley’s face were because he had cosmetic surgery on his nose.

Wham had two UK No. 1 singles in 1984 and were competing that year with pop rivals Duran Duran to be Britain’s biggest pop act. Napier-Bell devised a publicity scheme that he believed would turn Wham into major international stars. In April 1985, he took Wham to China for a 10-day visit. This gained huge worldwide media attention when Wham became the first Western pop group to play in China, in front of 15,000 people at the Worker’s Gymnasium in Beijing. In 1985, Ridgeley performed at the Live Aid charity concert next to backing singers like Kiki Dee while his bandmate Michael performed with Elton John. In 1986, “The Edge of Heaven” became Wham’s fourth and final UK No. 1 single. With Michael keen to move into a more adult market, Wham broke up after a farewell concert entitled “The Final” in front of 72,000 people at Wembley Stadium on Saturday 28 June 1986.

On 27 January 1991, Ridgeley joined Michael on stage for a few songs at the encore of his performance at the Rock in Rio event at the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro. He also stars in a 2005 documentary, A Different Story, about the life of George Michael and also appeared as a studio guest on the first series of the BBC 2 programme Fantasy Football League in 1994.

In 2005, Ridgeley and Michael made plans to reunite as Wham for Live 8, but Ridgeley reportedly pulled out at the last minute. In 2012, Michael dismissed rumours that he and Ridgeley were set for a Wham reunion to mark the 30th anniversary of the group’s first record. Michael said that there was no truth in speculation the group would reform for a one-off concert. Upon hearing of Michael’s death on 25 December 2016, Ridgeley paid his respects on Twitter, saying, “Heartbroken at the loss of my beloved friend Yog. Since 1982, he has reportedly amassed £10 million from sales and royalties of records Although the single “Careless Whisper” was issued as a Michael solo piece, it was credited as being co-written by Ridgeey. It has sold six million copies worldwide and, as of 2012, was the 34th best-selling single of all time in the United Kingdom, having sold over 1.3 million copies. Ridgeley still receives thousands of pounds a year from his share of “Careless Whisper” royalties alone.

Following the breakup of Wham, Ridgeley moved to Monaco, and tried his hand at Formula Three motor racing. Meeting with little success, Ridgeley moved to Los Angeles in pursuit of a career in acting. He returned to Britain permanently in 1990. CBS Records (later Sony Music), having taken up the option on Wham’s contract that specified solo albums from Michael and Ridgeley, released a guitar and drum driven solo recording from Ridgeley, Son of Albert, in 1990. His brother Paul, an occasional percussionist for Bananarama, played drums on the album. Singles included “Shake” and “Red Dres. Ridgeley’s record company, CBS, passed up the option of a second album from him after unsuccessful sales of the album Son of Albert, which was panned by critics and failed to make the top 75 in the UK AND was one of the worst received albums of 1990, achieving only half a star in a savage Rolling Stone magazine review. Andrew Ridgley is also involved in a lot of charitable work and has several times participated in the Dallaglio Cycle Slam, a charity bike ride for the Dallaglio Rugby Works, established in 2009 by England rugby legend Lawrence Dallaglio, that helps young people tackle life in a positive way, with the help of Rugby

Mark E. Smith (The Fall)

Best known as the lead singer, lyricist and only constant member of the post-punk group The Fall, the late great English singer and songwriter Mark Edward Smith tragically died 24 January 2018. He was born 5 March 1957. when he was six months old, His family moved to Prestwich , occupying the house they inherited after his grandfather’s death. Smith’s father died suddenly in 1989 of a heart attack. He has said that he didn’t become interested in music until he was about 14, when he discovered Captain Beefheart. He had early memories of The Beatles but remembered thinking that it was all a bit effeminate. He attended Sedgley Park Primary School, and later Stand Grammar School for Boys before quitting aged 16. That year, he left home and moved in with his girlfriend and future Fall keyboardist, Una Baines, later of the Blue Orchids. He subsequently took an evening class in A-level Literature. His first job was in a meat factory, before he became a shipping clerk on Salford docks.

Smith formed The Fall, named after the novel by Albert Camus, with friends Martin Bramah, Una Baines and Tony Friel, after attending a Sex Pistols gig at the Manchester Free Trade Hall in June 1976. After Smith dropped out of college at the age of 19. Originally they were named The Outsiders, after another Camus work. He subsequently gave up his job as a shipping clerk at Salford docks shortly afterward to devote his full energies to the band. The early Fall line-up came of age during the 1970s punk rock movement, although their music underwent numerous stylistic changes, often concurrently with changes in the group’s lineup. The band’s 40 year career can be broken into five broad periods, based on the band’s membership. These include their early late 1970s line-up, the classic Fall period of Hanley and dual drummers, the Brix years of 1984-89, their early 1990s revival, and everything after the on-stage fight in New York, after which Hanley quit and Smith was arrested.

Smith married the American guitarist and Fall member Brix Smith on 19 July 1983, after they met in Los Angeles during the band’s American tour earlier that year. They divorced in 1989, and he remarried twice after this. His second wife was Saffron Prior, who had worked for The Fall’s fan club; their marriage ended in 1995. He married Eleni Poulou, also called Elenor or Elena, in 2001. Poulou joined the band in September 2002 and left in July 2016. Smith and Poulou divorced in 2016, and Smith’s partner at the time of his death was his manager Pamela Vander.

Referring to the Fall’s 60-odd former members, Smith claimed that he had “only” fired around half the number of people he is said to have dismissed, and that some left of their own free will. He would fire musicians for seemingly trivial reasons; he once dismissed a sound engineer for eating a salad, later explaining that “the salad was the last straw”. Founding member Marc Riley was fired for dancing to a Deep Purple song during their Australian tour, although the two had had many arguments beforehand. Smith said that he often changed musicians so that they would not become lazy or complacent. When the influential British DJ and Fall supporter John Peel died in 2004, Smith made a notorious appearance on the BBC’s Newsnight show in which he seemed stunned and incoherent, and which he afterwards put down to a rare incidence of stage fright.

While the Fall never achieved widespread success beyond minor hit singles in the mid and late 1980s, they maintained a loyal cult following throughout their career. The widespread misunderstanding that the Fall was just a bunch of guys lead by MES is disproved by the reliance he had on a number of band members. In particular Steve Hanley is regarded as one of the most talented bassists of his generation, equal to Peter Hook, Andy Rourke or Gary Mounfield. During their 42-year existence, the Fall’s line-up included some 60 musicians who, with Smith, released 32 studio albums and many singles and EPs. His best-known recordings include “Totally Wired” and “Hit the North”.

A long-term heavy drinker, Smith had a difficult and complex personality. He was celebrated for his biting and targeted wit, evident in his acerbic but highly quotable interviews, for which he was much in demand by music journalists throughout his career. He was deeply suspicious of the trappings of fame, and largely avoided socialising with Fall associates. The dark and sardonic aspect of Smith’s personality often seeped into his lyrics, and he especially sought to avoid music industry people, who were the frequent targets of his diatribes. His vocal delivery included a characteristic of ending every line with “-ah” or “-uh”.

Smith’s approach to music was unconventional; he did not have a high regard for musicianship, believing that “rock & roll isn’t even music really. It’s a mistreating of instruments to get feelings over”; a tendency that contributed to the Fall’s high turnover of musicians. Nevertheless The Fall are regarded as one of the premier post-punk bands. Smith was notoriously difficult to work with but was revered by fans and critics during his lifetime, and was described as a “strange kind of antimatter national treasure”.

Ade Edmondson

British comedian, actor, musician presenter and Director Ade Edmondson was born 24 January 1957 in Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire. He attended Pocklington School, East Riding of Yorkshire from 1968 to 1975 a rather old-fashioned, all boys public school, halfway between York and Hull where his English teacher, Michael Aubrey encouraged him to pursue drama, casting him in a number of school plays, and allowing him to take time out of other lessons to do drama. After Pocklington, Edmondson went to the University of Manchester to study drama, and met future comedy partner Rik Mayall. He graduated with a 2:1 degree. Edmondson and Mayall soon became best friends and worked on the alternative comedy scene.

Edmonson became part of the alternative comedy boom. Under the name 20th Century Coyote, Edmondson and Mayall became one of the star attractions at The Comedy Store. As their popularity grew, Edmondson, Mayall and other upcoming comedians, including Nigel Planer, Peter Richardson, Alexei Sayle and French and Saunders moved from the Comedy Store to The Comic Strip club.The Comic Strip soon gained a reputation as one of the most popular comedy clubs in London and soon came to the attention of Channel 4. Edmondson and the others were commissioned to act in six self-contained half-hour films, using the group as comedy actors rather than stand-up performers. The series, entitled The Comic Strip Presents… debuted on 2 November 1982 (the opening night of Channel 4). The first episode to be broadcast was “Five Go Mad in Dorset”, a parody of Enid Blyton’s Famous Five, which drew anger from some viewers for the way it mercilessly satirised a children’s classic. Edmondson starred as one of the five.

imageEdmondson, Mayall, Richardson, Planer and Sayle also starred in The Young Ones, a sitcom in the same anarchic style as The Comic Strip. (Richardson later decided not to proceed and was replaced by Christopher Ryan.) The show revolved around the shared house where four students lived during their studies at Scumbag College. It was noted at the time of its first airing for its violent slapstick, with Edmondson’s character as the main instigator. The series captured public imagination and remains one of Britain’s most popular sitcoms. During this time, Edmondson also appeared in a bank advertisement in what was, basically, his “Vyvyan” guise. Following the success of The Comic Strip Presents… and, The Young Ones, Edmondson and Mayall created “The Dangerous Brothers” with Edmondson as “Sir Adrian Dangerous” in Saturday Live (1985–1987). In 1983, he appeared as the lead singer “Vim Fuego” in the spoof heavy metal band called “Bad News” with his Young Ones co-stars Rik Mayall, Nigel Planer and Peter Richardson of “Comic Strip Presents…”.

On 11 May 1985, Edmondson married fellow Comic Strip actor Jennifer Saunders, with whom he has three daughters: Eleanor, Beatrice and Freya. Edmondson’s university nickname of “Eddie Monsoon”, a play on his surname, inspired the name of Saunders’ character, “Edina Monsoon” in Absolutely Fabulous and his own characters “Eddie Catflap” (Filthy Rich & Catflap) and “Eddie Hitler” (Bottom). Edmondson and Saunders jointly established their own production company called “Mr and Mrs Monsoon Limited”. Edmondson also starred with Saunders in Happy Families, written by Ben Elton which featured the dysfunctional Fuddle family. In 1987, Edmondson reunited with Planer and Mayall to star in Filthy Rich and Catflap, a comic attack on showbiz, again written by Elton. He played a character called “Edward Catflap”, a coarse and drunken minder of light entertainment nonentity “Richie Rich”. In this show Edmondson displayed the same slapstick characteristics as Vyvyan and Eddie Hitler” in Bottom. Edmondson also co-starred in 1987 with Mayall in the ITV sit-com Hardwicke House. In 1988, he released a follow up to How To Be A Complete Bastard called The Bastard’s Book of the Worst. In 1989 he made an appearance in an episode of Blackadder Goes Forth as The Red Baron, arch-nemesis to Mayall’s character, Lord Flashheart. He played the lead role in the 1985 spin-off feature film, The Supergrass. Edmondson has also appeared in numerous TV programmes including Jonathan Creek, Holby City, Miss Austen Regrets, as himself on Hell’s Kitchen and the sitcom Teenage Kicks.

Edmondson played Brad Majors in the 1990 West End run of The Rocky Horror Show, alongside Tim McInnerny as Frank-N-Furter and Ed Tudor-Pole as Riff-Raff. He also appears on the soundtrack album of the production. In 1991, he teamed with Rik Mayall co-writing and co-starring in the sitcom, Bottom. Edmondson starred as “Edward Elizabeth Hitler” opposite Mayall’s “Richard Richard”. The series featured the slapstick and crude humour for which the pair had become famous. Mayall and Edmonson have said that Bottom was a cruder cousin of Waiting for Godot about the pointlessness of life. In 1991 Edmondson played Estragon to Mayall’s Vladimir in Samuel Beckett’s play in the West End. Although Bottom was popular, it was criticised for its often vulgar humour. The show was also turned into five UK stage tours (1993, 1995, 1997, 2001 and 2003). The violent nature of these shows saw both Edmondson and Mayall ending up in hospital.

In 1993, Edmondson starred alongside Richard Briers in a black comedy called If You See God, Tell Him. Edmondson played Gordon Spry, whose uncle (Briers) is paralysed. His erratic behaviour causes problems for Gordon. The series comprised four episodes, each 45 minutes long, and only broadcast once. Since 1993 Edmondson has been voicing The Animal in adverts for Peperami. September 1995, Edmondson released his first (comic) novel, The Gobbler. In 1996, he played the role of Ace Face/Bellboy at The Who’s performance of Quadrophenia at London’s Hyde Park. He provided the voice forA video game called Animal, featuring Peperami’s “the animal”. He also voiced engine stoker Jones, in the animated series Captain Star. In the 1998 ITV pantomime Jack and the Beanstalk, Edmondson played Jack’s mother Dame Dolly alongside Neil Morrissey, Denise Van Outon, Paul Merton, Julian Clary and Julie Walters.

In 1998 Mayall was seriously injured and spent a few days in a coma. Mayall and Edmondson wrote a script for a sequel to Bottom which became Guest House Paradiso. Edmondson appeared regularly in Series 4 of the BBC mystery series Jonathan Creek. He had a lead role playing an NHS doctor in the comedy series Doctors and Nurses. In Surviving Disaster, a BBC docudrama about the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, Edmondson played the role of Dr Valery Legasov. In 2005 he appeared as a celebrity model on Star Portraits with Rolf Harris. he alsoappeared as Percy “Abra” Durant in Holby City. In 2008 he played Henry Austen in the BBC produced film Miss Austen Regrets and Vernon in the ITV sitcom Teenage Kicks. In April 2009 he appeared on the cooking show Hell’s Kitchen, where he reached the final, coming second to winner Linda Evans. In Christmas2009 Edmondson played the role of Captain Hook in the Canterbury Marlowe Arena pantomime.

In 2010, he said that he had quit comedy, and wanted to focus more on his band, He also played down the idea of a potential reunion although Rik Mayall appeared during Edmondson’s winning performance of The Dying Swan on BBC1’s Let’s Dance for Comic Relief on 5 March 2011. In 2011. Edmondson hosted the six-part series The Dales, which followed a number of families who live and work in the Yorkshire Dales. The show was recorded during 2010 by Shiver Productions for ITV Studios. In September 2011, Edmondson appeared on Something For The Weekend and said that he and Rik Mayall were planning to reunite and make another series of Bottom, set in an old people’s home. Edmondson presented the ITV series Ade in Britain, which was broadcast from 7 November to 2 December 2011. The series consists of Edmondson travelling around to different parts of the United Kingdom and giving a programme on that part of the British Isles; it consists of Edmondson informing people about interesting features of the part which he has visited, and often involves him meeting folk singers. A second series was filmed.

Edmondson appeared on the BBC television series That’s Britain! in each episode his task was to report as an “insider” in how a region of Britain works. A one off special, Britain Beware, about the history of British public information films, was hosted by Ade Emondson. the Edmondson and Mayall’s characters of Richie and Eddie were due to return in 2013 in Hooligan’s Island, a television adaptation of their 1997 tour of the same name. However he later pulled out of the new series stating that he changed his mind, and wished to pursue other interests. Edmondson also starred in the film Blood. Edmondson and Saunders reunited with their former Comic Strip colleagues in 2012 for a Famous Five sequel, Five Go to Rehab. Edmondson also won Celebrity Master Chef 2013 competing against Les Dennis and Janet Street-Porter.

He also has a successful music career and In 1986, Edmondson achieved a number one hit in the UK singles charts when he and his co-stars from The Young Ones teamed up with Cliff Richard to record a new version of “Living Doll” for the inaugural Comic Relief campaign. Despite having been killed off in the final episode of the series, Edmondson played Vyvyan one last time in the video. The same year he co-wrote the book How to be a Complete Bastard together with Mark Leigh and Mike Lepine. Edmondson has directed pop videos for “Fiesta” byThe Pogues, “Prime Mover” by Zodiac Mindwarp, “Like The Weather” (1988) by 10,000 Maniacs, “Please Help The Cause Against Loneliness” by Sandie Shaw and “Hourglass” by Squeeze. In 1991, Edmondson formed The Bum Notes, who were a jazz instrumental band and conceived exclusively to perform theme music for Bottom.A fan of the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, Edmondson performed vocals with them as part of their 2006 reformation and countrywide tour. He also contributed vocals and writing for their 2007 album Pour l’Amour des Chiens.

In 2008 Edmondson founded the Bad Shepherds with Martin Allcock, Andy Dinan and Troy Donockley, performing punk and new wave classics on traditional folk instruments. The band have released two albums and toured in 2009, playing at places such as the Trowbridge Village Pump Festival. The Bad Shepherds also headlined the first ever Looe Music Festival in 2011. In 2010 he founded The Idiot Bastard Band with Simon Brint, Rowland Rivron, Neil Innes and Phill Jupitus. The Idiot Bastard Band perform original comedy songs as well as cover versions, and their shows often feature guest performers. The group have continued to perform following the death of Brint in 2011. In 2011 he presented a series of shows for ITV: The Dales, set in the Yorkshire Dales, and Ade in Britain touring numerous heritage sites in Britain. Edmondson has been married to fellow comedian Jennifer Saunders since 1985 and they have three daughters and a grandson.